Stories - an experience for your audience -
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Stories - an experience for your audience -
- Everyone - every company, organization has a story. Tell it, we all can learn and benefit from your story but be authentic, real
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Story and Brand Is a Way of Being: 5 Secrets To Engage Consumers

Story and Brand Is a Way of Being: 5 Secrets To Engage Consumers | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it
This new class of shoppers cares about style, status, and doing right by the planet. Here's how to reach them.

Via Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's curator insight, May 26, 2014 2:10 PM

This article by Mitch Baranowski and Raphael Bemporad is all about the extent of aspirational consumers and how to reach them. This has huge implications for both branding and storytelling -- because they are the largest consumer segment globally.


What is the biggest implication? Branding is not a tool for marketing. Storytelling is not a tool for branding. Instead, both are ways of being. As the authors say, "What’s new here is that Aspirationals don’t want flat, empty statements conveyed in slick ad campaigns. They want brands to embody a deeper purpose." The authors provide links to research plus provide examples.


Storytelling is the way to communicate deeper purpose, vision, values, and beliefs. Story is the way these come alive. Story is the way companies embody them -- it's the ability to walk your talk.


That being said, the 5 ways offered here to engage aspirational consumers all involve storytelling -- your stories give them something to believe in, build a shared story they want to belong to, you can share their stories as a way to amplify their voices plus give them social status, and the body of stories forms a platform for action. 


So get your story on and connect better with this increasingly powerful consumer segment that is only going to grow.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Halima Ozimova's curator insight, May 26, 2014 11:20 PM

насчет образовательных продуктов / услуг?!

Mercedes Jahn's curator insight, May 27, 2014 6:49 PM

Tips day..

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Getting our Heads On Straight: Brand As Verb Principles (via stories)

80% of leaders say their brands offer a superior customer experience. Only 8% of customers agree. Meanwhile, marketers are tortured by the fact that the numb...

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Karen Dietz's curator insight, April 18, 2014 9:07 PM

I'm heading to Portland, OR soon for a conference of PR and branding professionals and the theme is Story. As I'm thinking about the conference, I found this SlideShare program and thing it's really great -- because it's all about how to think better about branding and its link to customer experiences that then generate stories.


As I've pointed out before, story has impacted branding in huge ways. But it takes awhile for old mind-sets to fully make the change. Me included! So it's always helpful to have a few reminders around like this piece.


All the principles here can be actualized using stories. That's good news! And the examples shared here are good too.


Happy branding!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Morgan Newall's curator insight, April 21, 2014 6:07 AM
Why a Verb? Because nobody got time for you if you aint doing nuttin!
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Creating New Stories: How Brands Can Achieve Real People Impact

Creating New Stories: How Brands Can Achieve Real People Impact | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it
Instead of flash in the pan campaigns, what if big companies enabled all citizens to make lasting change?

Via Karen Dietz, Murhaf Taia
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Karen Dietz's curator insight, March 27, 2014 4:52 PM

There's a big difference between telling a story and living a story. Some marketers and those in branding are still grappling with this distinction. But this article can help understand this dynamic and how to move forward.


The post by Sebastian Buck and Brian Hardwick for Fast Company discusses how marketing is changing. Telling a brand story is only the first step. What marketing and brand storytelling actually live a story they are setting in motion new stories to be told that can bring incredible change.


But everyone needs to get their heads wrapped around working differently in order to have new stories being told about a business. It's all about going for a co-created experience that makes a difference in the world.


The authors talk about how having a big shared goal + creativity + connectivity = a big impact.


It's a short article, but carries great insights for us about how storytelling is continuing to change marketing and branding (IMHO).


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Neuroscience Study Identifies "Story Button" & What it Says About Brand/Human Love

Neuroscience Study Identifies "Story Button" & What it Says About Brand/Human Love | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it
Move over focus groups. Neuroscience-based research from Innocean seeks to uncover what people really like and seemingly reveals that, sometimes...

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Karen Dietz's curator insight, March 13, 2014 12:48 PM

Hmmmmm -- here's some new research from neuroscience. The company Innocean wired up 8 people to measure their responses, asked them questions about brands, and then about people they love.


Guess what -- 3 of the 8 people showed more love for brands than people. Why? The brands had a stronger story attached to them. What does it mean? Their interpretation is that there is a story button in our brain.


OK -- hold on here. I've got some problems with this. I'm not a neuroscientist but some of this seems like a lot of over-reaching.


First of all -- 8 people is a very tiny sample. That 3 of the 8 had a certain experience does not mean much at all.  All the study points to is more questions. Like for the 3 people who loved their brands more than loved ones, are their relationships troubled? If so, that would naturally lead to mythologizing a watch. And is a watch a brand or simply an object evoking strong memories? Is the love for the Seattle Seahawks more about someone mythologizing their identity? And does that reflect at all on this person's love for his toddler? Ay yi yi -- I could go on.


And then to conclude there's a "story button" in the brain that is more like a switch to turn on and off is problematic for me also. We think in stories so narrative structure is much more imbedded in who we are than a pus button indicates.


So I remain highly skeptical about this study until A LOT more research is done. Read the article and tell me what you think.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Ivan Mercado Lorberg's curator insight, March 14, 2014 11:34 AM

¿Es posible "amar" o comprometerse con una marca en particular en un mundo tan poligámico como el de hoy enn día? Acá una respuesta Neurocientífica

Mervi Rauhala's curator insight, March 18, 2014 3:38 AM

Interesting study about how people "love "their favorite brands and icons even more than people. But there has to be a special story related to the product or brand, but but...The results could be also interpreted otherwise. Leaves lot of open questions.

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Biz Storytelling: What Marketers Are Missing About Making Emotional Connections

Biz Storytelling: What Marketers Are Missing About Making Emotional Connections | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it
Douglas Van Praet discusses the neurological nature of empathy and how marketers often focus on competition at the expense of real connections.

Via Karen Dietz
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David Hain's curator insight, November 26, 2013 12:16 AM

Using empathy adds to your business story. 

Juliana Loh's curator insight, November 27, 2013 4:17 AM

Marketers are a strange breed... so attached to their 'numbers and analytics'. After returning from a series of marketing-focused conferences, I heard one say to the other: "they want more empathy? okay then, throw them more testimonials and let them talk about it online". *groan*  No no no...  maybe you should read this article. (Thanks Karen)

Julien Pepiot's curator insight, November 27, 2013 10:00 AM

"Provide value and not take value = a customer for life"

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How Creative Content Builds Your Brand’s Reputation [videos]

How Creative Content Builds Your Brand’s Reputation [videos] | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it
Building and maintaining a successful brand is a difficult balancing act. This article looks at how brands can find and maintain a consistent voice...

Via Martin (Marty) Smith, John van den Brink
Hans Heesterbeek's insight:

I would like to ad a few: Be authentic, tell true stories, be passionated.  

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Martin (Marty) Smith's curator insight, August 12, 2013 7:43 AM

Solid post on the value of having a unique voice with great examples and several videos. Voice can be created in copy, design or video and this post covers all three well.

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SXSW: Confusion between stories and narratives for biz

SXSW: Confusion between stories and narratives for biz | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it
If you’ve spent any time at all recently reading PR and marketing blogs, you know that storytelling is a top trend, and for good reason.  Building storytelling into the communications mix delivers ...

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Jack Tang's comment, May 9, 2013 2:10 AM
I agree with Kevin that narrative is different with stores. Narrative is more affective way for company to understand the process of what they did wrong or right. In the other side, stories are just to tell and it is not really interactive to the company.
An, SungBin's comment, May 9, 2013 10:43 PM
I agree with the article, any company can have their own stories. However, it is hard to get attention by the customers in these days. and I think the narrative has more powerful influences then a just stories. of course, it depends how you narrate the stories to customers, it might get worse.
Karen Dietz's comment, May 10, 2013 11:31 AM
All of these comments are very interesting and I think some additional points need to be made. First, not all narratives re stories. A report or an essay or a testimonial are all types of narratives and are definitely not stories. A report can have stories within it, but is still a type of narrative. If people understood the DYNAMICS of storytelling they would know that stories continually evolve and are all about engagement. Storytelling is NOT about telling, it's about the co-created experience that happens when people are experiencing the telling and listening at the same time. Stories by their nature are interactive. Can narrative evolve? Sure. But the points made at the conference is setting up a false dichotomy between narratives and stories, which when put into practice, is less relevant. The most important piece to pay attention to is the engagement and evolving nature of stories. Saying stories end and narratives don't is silly and not true.
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Wrapped up in a Book: The Role of Emotional Engagement in Reading -- & Storytelling!

Wrapped up in a Book: The Role of Emotional Engagement in Reading -- & Storytelling! | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it

Have you ever gotten lost in the pages of a good book? If so, you may have been more empathetic afterward. According to new research published in PLOS ONE, reading fiction may affect the reader’s empathetic skills over a period of time.


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Karen Dietz's comment, March 2, 2013 3:42 PM
I agreed Fred. And yes Miklos, I love it when what we know to be true is validated by research.
Kala's comment, March 4, 2013 10:08 AM
A big thank you for your overall curation work about storytelling! You are the very first one I see doing it so "intelligently", with real added-value :)
Karen Dietz's comment, March 5, 2013 1:26 PM
Thank you so much Kala! You have made my day :)
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Effective storytelling for business

Effective storytelling for business | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it

As content takes its rightful place at the forefront of marketing, I'm seeing many marketers fail at basic storytelling.

 

Marketers are ineffective when they use the classic "customer testimonial" format and pop that onto their blog or make it into a video. "Here’s our product. It is great. Here are customers who say it is great. Now buy some of our product." This just doesn't hold people's attention.

 

How interesting would a book or movie be were it to have this plot?:
Boy meets girl.
They fall in love.
They get married.

 

That's what most people do with their business writing.

 

Effective storytelling

The best stories drip with conflict. They have a hero and sometimes a villain. There is a story arc. As a writing teacher once told me: "Writing without conflict is propaganda."


Via Karen Dietz
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Ignacio Conejo Moreno's comment, February 19, 2013 10:24 AM
Ok, thank you, I'll retry later :)
Jeff Domansky's comment, February 19, 2013 1:27 PM
Seems to be working now Ignacio.
Two Pens's curator insight, February 19, 2013 11:30 PM

All business have conflict: lack of sales, poor service, employee malaise... 

The issue is often that management doesn't want to talk about the negative but you have to have a hellish situation in order to make a story compelling. 

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50 Business Storytelling Mantras to Live By (2013)

50 Business Storytelling Mantras to Live By (2013) | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it
For the past two years (2011 and 2012), I shared my top 50 business storytelling and communications mantras. As I plan for 2013, I always look to my l...

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Karen Dietz's curator insight, January 18, 2013 1:33 PM

Love these for some Friday inspiration! Keep these handy to keep you on your best storytelling toes. 


Thanks Ira Koretsky for putting this list together and keeping us all on track!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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Story Worldwide's Storytelling Matrix

Story Worldwide's Storytelling Matrix | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it

Omar Kattan: "This excellent video by Story Worldwide has been featured on Brand Stories for a while now. Not sure if you’ve seen it? If you haven’t, it’s definitely worth your time" ...


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How Honda's Agency Taps Authentic Stories for Social | ClickZ

How Honda's Agency Taps Authentic Stories for Social | ClickZ | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it

RPA's new VP and director of creative social media, J Barbush, seeks passionate everyday brand fans and stories.

 

Hey -- here's a company doing brand storytelling the right way! What a great article -- complete with examples and a video. The company? Honda!

 

What are they doing right?

Listening first Finding authentic customer stories that have a connection to Honda Connecting with those customers and making them feel comfortable in sharing their story Sharing those customer stories but NOT as a campaign Recognizing that brand storytelling is iterative and evolves over time

 

The way they are doing these steps creates engagement. And I loved the story and the video.

 

Read the article for all the details about how effective brand storytelling is happening. Now here's the good part -- you can do this too!

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


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How To Ask [for stories]--And Listen [to stories]--Like You Mean It

How To Ask [for stories]--And Listen [to stories]--Like You Mean It | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it

Questions are the expressive, probing language for growing others; listening is the receptive, facilitating language for growing others. These two complementary approaches form a continuous growth conversation loop.

 

Leaders who are helping others to grow and innovate are always trying to craft the best questions to make a difference. Here's how to ask the questions that will propel your team and your organization forward.

 

Listening -- I mean listening really well -- is sometimes hard to do. Here's a great article by Kevin Cashman, author of The Pause Principle, reminding us that the more deeply and authentically we can listen to another, the deeper our questions go, and the deeper our understanding becomes.

 

Listening deeply is the first storytelling skill to build -- so you know which story to share or ask for. And then so you can dig more deeply into the story to understand what it really means.

 

For leaders, this is essential. For anyone wanting to master business storytelling, it is critical. Many marketing and branding folks have still not caught on to listening as being a vital component when using stories.

 

Sooooo -- here's a reminder that also contains some great insights, a list of what not to do, and a nice section on the power of authentic questions.

 

Now I'll go on a hunt and see if I can find an article for you just on the Art of the Question. For as they say in Appreciative Inquiry, the question is the intervention -- so knowing how to craft and ask the question is key.

 

In the meantime, enjoy this article.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


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How to Find + Tell Awesome Customer Stories

How to Find + Tell Awesome Customer Stories | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it
Want to grow your business? Then share your customer stories.

Via Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's curator insight, May 22, 2014 2:54 PM

I just wrote this blog for Curatti.com that was posted today and it's all about how to find and tell your customer's stories.


The post is a compendium of the best articles I've found on the topic plus one blog post I wrote myself.


There are lots of good resources for you to investigate. I include articles on who the real hero of the story is, how to gather stories, how to listen for customer stories, and how to turn your customer stories into tons of repurpose-able content. Each article has more resources or examples to check out.


After reviewing this material everyone should be able to gather and tell their customer stories in powerful ways.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s curator insight, May 23, 2014 2:28 AM

Great collection of articles by Karen!  You will find many ways to go about collecting and sharing your customer stories.

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Fast Food for the Mind: Stories or Tweets?

Fast Food for the Mind: Stories or Tweets? | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it
Through social media interactions via online venues like Facebook and Twitter, our society today is overrun in the same way with “fast food for the mind.” Just as our bodies can tolerate only so much unhealthy food, our minds equally have a certain cognitive bandwidth. But instead of spending our bandwidth on deeper thoughts, we often sacrifice it for the instant gratification and distraction of the mind offered by myriad online venues.

Via Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's curator insight, April 10, 2014 9:43 AM

Here is a quick but powerful piece to get you thinking today. It's not a heavey message, it simply calls into question some of our social media habits, and helps put storytelling -- business and personal -- into a different light.


For many years in my work I've talke about the difference between junk food stories and healthful stories. The author, Souvik Choudhury makes the distinction here between fast food stories and wholesome stories. Love it love it.


Go read the article and figure out which ones you want to be telling most of the time (hey -- an occassional fast food story is fun too!).


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

Theophilus's curator insight, April 11, 2014 8:37 AM

A necessary skill to have in this fast-paced world.

Ali Anani's curator insight, May 2, 2014 12:55 AM

Food for thought, but what food?

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Creating New Stories: How Brands Can Achieve Real People Impact

Creating New Stories: How Brands Can Achieve Real People Impact | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it
Instead of flash in the pan campaigns, what if big companies enabled all citizens to make lasting change?

Via Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's curator insight, March 27, 2014 4:52 PM

There's a big difference between telling a story and living a story. Some marketers and those in branding are still grappling with this distinction. But this article can help understand this dynamic and how to move forward.


The post by Sebastian Buck and Brian Hardwick for Fast Company discusses how marketing is changing. Telling a brand story is only the first step. What marketing and brand storytelling actually live a story they are setting in motion new stories to be told that can bring incredible change.


But everyone needs to get their heads wrapped around working differently in order to have new stories being told about a business. It's all about going for a co-created experience that makes a difference in the world.


The authors talk about how having a big shared goal + creativity + connectivity = a big impact.


It's a short article, but carries great insights for us about how storytelling is continuing to change marketing and branding (IMHO).


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Glenlivet Gets Up Close and Personal With Their "Single Stories" Banding Campaign

Glenlivet Gets Up Close and Personal With Their "Single Stories" Banding Campaign | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it
Looking to mine authentic moments, the single malt brand shares personal stories from leading men, including Bryan Cranston, Ed Burns, and Andy Spade.

Via Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's curator insight, February 23, 2014 11:01 AM

Now here is a powerful use of stories in business. In this case, this post talks about how Glenlivet is using personal stories in their branding efforts.


Glenlivet is premium single malt whiskey. In this campaign the company has successful men sharing stories about a poignant moment that was instrumental in their success.


As Troy Gorczyca Senior Brand Manager, Pernod Ricard, says, the goal of the series was to “showcase their triumphs, admit their failures, and highlight the moments that make us human.”


At first I thought "Oh, this is about CEOs bragging about some achievement they accomplished." But no -- these guys share about their parents, a mentor, or how a single phone call changed a life. Yeah! Disaster averted.


Now I have only one quibble -- how come these stories are only from guys???!!! Where are successful women's stories? It's not like we don't like or drink Glenlivet -- because we do! And we share stories over drinks just like guys do -- in fact, probably more.


Here's what's mystifying to me: the co-lead on this project is a woman. And the author of this article is a woman. Yet neither pointed out this discrepancy.


OK, rant over. The article talks a bit about how challenges in gathering the stories. And other insights are shared here. So go read it -- other than the gender issue, it's a good piece.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Gavin Meikle's curator insight, February 24, 2014 2:57 AM

Stories are the key to successful influence.  sharing a short story that embodies the message or principle you wish you communicate, it THE most powerful way to spread your influence.   We remember stories much more that dry facts or powerpoint slides.   Glenlivet clearly understand  and are harnessing the power of stories - Do you?

Karen Dietz's comment, February 24, 2014 1:13 PM
Excellent points Gavin!
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Your Story is Your Brand - Empower Employees and Customer Advocates to Carry the Message

Your Story is Your Brand - Empower Employees and Customer Advocates to Carry the Message | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it

Via janlgordon
Hans Heesterbeek's insight:

we need marketing, we need the people customers, employees, freinds. We need relationships. Relationships are build on authenticithy are build on feelings, truth. Not build on hollow frases you have to put in energy in relationships and honesty. Meeting people one way or the other 

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janlgordon's comment, September 7, 2013 3:50 PM
Jean Schiller - You're preaching to the choir, companies have all the social intelligence tools and technology to accomplish this. They need to be informed - investing in marketing is the old way of doing business. Investing in people to communicate your message is the new way.
Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s comment, September 7, 2013 8:38 PM
Scalability only works with very standardized and repeatable product/services. If you are a customized job shop the scalability of direct SME interaction is limited and ultimately a money losing proposition, unless you bill for it. Think about legal or medical practices where every interaction is likely to be unique.
janlgordon's comment, September 9, 2013 2:10 PM
Hans Heesterbeek I absolutely agree with you, thank you for your comment.
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Storytelling vs Storydoing - the stupidest hype ever.

Storytelling vs Storydoing - the stupidest hype ever. | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it
Rage, Rant & Rave. I am pissed off and I've had enough. Here is why. There is this big hoopla now around storytelling versus storydoing. Oh my God. As if Aristotle in 500 BC - yes 2600 years ag...

Via Karen Dietz
Hans Heesterbeek's insight:

I love this blog. I would call it authenticity. I agree most stories are made up, make believe and even worse the companies believe these stories themselves. I agree fully that's not story telling that is Adevertising. 

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Karen Dietz's curator insight, July 28, 2013 10:18 PM

A few articles ago I curated the piece on the research between storytelling and storydoing companies. http://www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it?q=storydoers 

As I said in my review, I applaud the endeavor to quantify storytelling, and the results shown are promising. But some of the assumptions are troubling and I end up having more questions than applause. Some of the comments in the discussion thread in the online article by Ty Montague are interesting too. Some make valid points. Some raise my eyebrows.


In any event, my friend and business story colleague Ashraf Ramzey in the Netherlands chimes in with his opinion in his recent blog post. He is hot under the collar like I get sometimes :) Ashraf is brilliant, knows his stuff, is well trained in storytelling, and he isn't just blowing smoke.


For Ashraf, the research is just another expression of the hype around storytelling these days. And he puts in a better context some of the thinking these days about business storytelling and marketing/branding. 


Many thanks Ashraf for weighing in. And I hope my readers are getting the sense that there are many sides to business storytelling. The clearer we are about the approaches, methodologies, terms, etc. that we are using, the better of we will be.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Karen Dietz's comment, July 30, 2013 10:10 PM
Glad it struck a chord Hans! Yes, it's not storytelling but advertising.
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A Quarter for a Tale: The "Business Storytelling" Warning Label

A Quarter for a Tale: The "Business Storytelling" Warning Label | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it
Article: "The Warning Label for Business Storytelling" http://t.co/lhFGgnP30w

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Karen Dietz's curator insight, March 2, 2013 4:29 PM

Biz Story colleague Sean Buvala wrote this piece and it brought a grin to my face -- because IT IS TRUE!!


So glad he put together a biz storytelling warning label for us all. Good job Sean!


Unlike those annoying warning labels that come with every pillow you buy (and quickly remove at home), keep this one about storytelling front and center.


If you don't you'll be sorry.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, March 3, 2013 4:34 AM

Yeah, normal... too great a dose of everything is dangerous... be it positivity, story-telling, practically anything... "The dose makes the poison..." Like it...

Karen Dietz's comment, March 3, 2013 8:44 PM
Thank you for the commen Miklos and glad you found the post valuable!
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How to Tell a Visual Story (Even You, B2B): A Marketer's Guide

How to Tell a Visual Story (Even You, B2B): A Marketer's Guide | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it
Content - As storytelling becomes more and more part of marketing, another trend is coming clearly into focus: Brands are becoming more visual. Businesses that aren't ready for this visual revolution will ...

Via Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's curator insight, February 25, 2013 6:59 PM

This is quite a meaty article on ways B2B -- or any organization -- can capitalize on visual storytelling.


There are lots of ideas and examples here to get you started. And great advice, too. The SlideShare doc has good next steps to implement. And for the next 90 days, the entire presenation from the conference that generated this article is available free online.


The stats that are shared I've seen around a lot, and curated an article on the chart in this article when it first came out a few months ago. But the data is still valid!


I love the tip: show how your product lives in the world. Don't just show the product or service -- show it in action, with real live people.


There is a lot more here and tons of links to click through for more info. Have fun exploring and getting your visual storytelling together or upgraded.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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The Power of Customer Stories & Testimonials to Engage Employees

The Power of Customer Stories & Testimonials to Engage Employees | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it
Elaine Baker looks straight into the video camera and tells her story. Elaine is the owner of Paper Potpourri in Haverhill, Massachusetts. Her stationery boutique specializes in invitations …

Via Karen Dietz, Margaret Doyle
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Casey Strachan's curator insight, February 10, 2013 4:33 PM

Tested and true for building engagement, enhancing customer service, and building both brand and corporate culture.

Casey Strachan's curator insight, February 10, 2013 4:33 PM

Tested and true for building engagement, enhancing customer service, and building both brand and corporate culture.

Karen Dietz's comment, February 14, 2013 9:25 PM
Thanks for your insights Margaret and Casey!
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How Brands Build Transmedia Storyworlds - @houston_howard

How Brands Build Transmedia Storyworlds - @houston_howard | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it

"We use a comprehensive campaign approach, which we’ve coined 360° Storyweaving. An optimum 360° Storyweaving Campaign includes three distinct phases:

 

The Creation Phase, where we create and design the storyworld and story components around an original concept;

The Immersion Phase, where we design and plan strategy on how to immerse the audience further into the storyworld through thematic merchandising and media blurring;

The Community Phase, where we build communities through online engagement and interactivity as well as implement social outreach, which springs from the original purpose and theme of the project.

 

For us, the actual construction of the storyworld takes place in the Creation Phase, so that’s what we’ll focus on in this obnoxiously long blog entry. Here are the four most important rules we follow" ...


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Rescooped by Hans Heesterbeek from Storytelling Genius
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How To Tell A Story -- Story Wars 10 Simple Strategies

This is a Change This PDF that you can view here:

http://changethis.com/manifesto/98.01.StoryWars/pdf/98.01.StoryWars.pdf ;

 

I'm curating this because I like it and I don't like it -- and it is worth taking a look at the assumptions going on in this piece so we can get really smart.

 

This piece was put together by Jonathan Sachs, author of Winning The Story Wars. Sachs comes from the world of marketing and branding and this is reflected in his point of view.

 

Let's get what I don't like out of the way so I can chat about what I do like. Here is what puts my teeth on edge:


1. Sachs states that "we live in a world that has lost its connection to traditional myths and we are now trying to find new ones..." Welllllllll, if your slice of reality is the Hollywood, advertising, and branding world it is easy to get sucked into this notion. But we know from Jung, other psychologists, Folklorists, Anthroplogists, and neuroscience how this is not true. There is great irony in this "myth" that Sachs is perpetuating.

 

2. We are engaged in a war. Hmmmmm. Well, for millenium people have wanted to gain the attention of other people -- so nothing new there. Is this a war?  Could be. But if we are wanting to employ the power of storytelling to find solutions and create change as Sachs advocates, then war does not speak to the greater good but instead speaks to winners and losers where ongoing resentment is inherently built in. That sounds like the perpetuation of war -- same old same old. 

 

3. Sach's relationship to storytelling is still at the transactional level -- I'll tell you a story and you'll do what I want. While what he really wants it seems is storytelling at the transformational level. That requires a different mind-set and different story skills -- deep listening, engagement, story sharing, etc. And he completely ignores the relational level of storytelling.

 

4. Reliance on the Hero's Journey as the only story archetype to follow. Well, that's a narrow slice of reality and one geared towards youth. Yet other story archetypes are desperately needed: King/Queen, Trickster, Magician for example in order to affect change.

 

5. As a result, his 10 simple strategies stay at the transactional level with a few geared towards transformation (figure out what you stand for, declare your moral, reveal the moral). Now any great professional storyteller will tell you these that I've mentioned are essential for any compelling storytelling session. So they land in both worlds of transactional and transformational storytelling.

 

OK -- on to what I do like!

 

If you want to be heard, you'd better learn to tell better stories. The solutions to our significant problems these days depends on our ability to tell great stories and inspire people to think differently. Storytelling does not take long to learn, but it does take a lifetime to master, Know what a story is and is not Our abilitiy to disseminate stories is greater now than in the past -- because of technology. That is just a reminder to expend your use of different channels in sharing your stories that are now available to us.

 

Enough! Go read this piece yourself and decide what you think about it. It's a quick read.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


Via Karen Dietz, Margaret Doyle
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Meri Walker's comment, September 20, 2012 1:15 PM
Well, Karen! You made my day offering this terrific new Scoop. I'm enriched by the way you think, Karen. Especially about story... I guess we get really "bent" in a certain way by anthropological training and it's still pretty rare to find others who are looking through the kinds of filters you and I have installed in Mind. De-light-ful learning with and from you!
Jane Dunnewold's comment, April 8, 2013 4:42 PM
I'm behind the curve on this one, being new to scoop it - but as a teacher/artist I have to agree with your observation that delving into other archetypes would present rich opportunities to "language" storytelling in lots of environments. I use archetypes to get at the fears and struggles artists face in my workshops - and they aren't all about the hero's path! The Damsel in Distress is one that comes to mind...
Karen Dietz's comment, April 8, 2013 4:56 PM
I agree Jane. Archetypes can be so helpful in many ways. One of the ones I love for artists is the Trickster archetype, and the Magician. LOL on the 'damsel in distress'! Time to go put my 'big girl' panties on and deal with the next challenge :)
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What does your brand stand for? [inforgraphic]

What does your brand stand for? [inforgraphic] | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it
A brand is like the lead character of its own story.  And like any story character, brands  have values and beliefs that become associated with them through their actions.  The challenge for marketers is to characterize their brands first before...

 

Here's a terrific infographic from colleague Jim Signorelli that will help you create a persona for your business. Once you have a persona, it becomes much easier to target your storytelling and marketing/branding efforts. And connect more forcefully with customers.

 

There are 2 ways of finding your persona:

Examine all of your stories and determine their common characteristics. Then look at Jim's infographic to refine and finalize those qualities. Create your persona based on your discoveries. Examine this infographic to determine which character/characters you think you/your business embodies most. Check it against your stories. Build your persona from there.

What is a persona? It is a descriptive profile of a typical customer that includes a character type/archetype, demographic info, and as much flesh and bones information you can collect to create a bit of a story about this customer -- their likes, dislikes, challenges, etc.

 

Thanks Jim for putting together this very helpful infographic.

 

And if you want to dig into this topic more -- and get even smarter about using archetypes for marketing/branding -- read The Hero and The Outlaw; Building Extraordinary Brands Through the Power of Archetypes by M. Mark & C. Pearson. It's one of my bibles :)

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


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Saptarishi Das's curator insight, August 21, 2013 1:13 PM

And the story begins..