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Stories - an experience for your audience -
- Everyone - every company, organization has a story. Tell it, we all can learn and benefit from your story but be authentic, real
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Behold, The Very First Documentary Shot With Google Goggles

Behold, The Very First Documentary Shot With Google Goggles | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it

Mark Wilson: "Remember when we said that Google Glass needed Gucci and Prada to reinvent its tech as cool? Well, apparently they took the advice pretty literally."


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a transmedia project. Engage, Educate,...

a transmedia project. Engage, Educate, Motivate…Join the Movement. (a transmedia project.

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Five Storytelling Tips to Capture (and Keep) Your Audience

Content - Five Storytelling Tips to Capture and Keep Your Audience...
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The Best Of TED on 'Story' - TEDxEaling, Inspire, connect and educate

The Best Of TED on 'Story' - TEDxEaling, Inspire, connect and educate | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it

In the run up to TEDxEaling 2012, we will be sharing the very best TED talks on story, creativity and imagination. Updated three times a week.

 

I've curated earlier that this TED-X event devoted to storytelling was happening and wishing I could go. In marketing the event, the organizers have put together this list of the best of TED videos related to storytelling. 

 

Some I've curated here, some are new to me (oh goody! new stuff to explore!). What's missing are the videos by Brene Brown, Bobette Buster, Jane McGonigal, and Amy O'Leary that are part of the Just Story It collection. So add these to the list!

 

Enjoy exploring this list and if I find ones here that I like, I'll curate them too. And let me know which ones you like!

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 


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Intermediality and Transmedia Storytelling

Intermediality and Transmedia Storytelling | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it
By Michael Z. Newman A colleague who studies the history of media and popular culture was excited and a bit astonished recently to discover than an excellent book addressing a main topic of her res...

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More Effective B2B Content Marketing with Storytelling, Positioning & Personas

More Effective B2B Content Marketing with Storytelling, Positioning & Personas | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it

Free B2B buyer persona development tool. 

 

Just as every B2B company stakes a claim to a market position, each of them has a story to share. The challenge is in figuring out how to share that story in a way that aligns with the needs and priorities of prospects and customers. But, it’s not just sharing the story. It’s about making the story so compelling that it elevates perceptions of value and urgency resulting in more qualified leads and faster purchasing momentum.


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2 Key Resources for Crafting and Telling Your Story

2 Key Resources for Crafting and Telling Your Story | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it
2 Key Resources for Crafting and Telling Your Story #branding http://t.co/dSTW1KN1...

 

Want to up your marketing game? Then here are two resources for you recommended by a a great Internet marketer Dan Schawbel.

 

Both are books that look really intriguing. One is about a visual guide to writing effective website copy, which I think is quite a unique take on how you put together your website text.

 

The other book is about seven ways to tell the story of your personal brand.

 

Go read Dan's reviews and see if these books would be helpful to you. Enjoy!

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


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Six Storytellers PR Must Follow

Great stories are all around us It was a dark and stormy night.... A perfect way to start a story about storytellers. Not just any storytellers. But six storytellers or storytelling resources that PR and communication pros should know about.

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STORYTELLING: demystified

Communication is a struggle for each of us at one time or another. When we want to communicate something that is especially important to us, there can be an added pressure to do it justice. This leads to late nights in front of the computer, endless rewrites and communications pieces never getting published. From my years of fundraising and writing experience, I know learning a streamlined approach to producing content for communications can make all the difference. Inherent within this process are stories.

 

Using stories is one of the most effective and powerful tools at your disposal. Integrating them into your communications with the community and donors will get your organization the attention and fundraising results it deserves. This is something that has been widely talked about in the last few years. McKinsey Quarterly even cited this as a non-profit sector trend that the for-profit sector should take a cue from.


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Transmedia: between augmented storytelling and immersive practices

Transmedia: between augmented storytelling and immersive practices | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it

The term “transmedia” was coined in 1991 when Marsha Kinder spoke of “commercial transmedia supersystems”[+], referring to the field of advertising strategies. New definitions of transmedia storytelling have been developed and put forward since then. Several researchers have suggested avenues for reflection and different terminological elements that complement each other to explain this phenomenon. Several of these extensions are noteworthy, and illustrate both the diversity of the approaches taken and the fact that transmedia storytelling is part of an experimental process both in terms of practice and in terms of conceptualisation.


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Storytelling and organizational change: Podcast on Management-Issues

Storytelling and organizational change: Podcast on Management-Issues | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it
Storytelling and organizational change: Management and Business News...

 

Listen in as Dawna and Erwin sit in a coffee shop on the streets of Amsterdam and talk about the Stoos Stampede, career change, and the role of storytelling in creating effective change.


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The Convergence of Information and Storytelling

The Convergence of Information and Storytelling | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it

 Everyday our lives and businesses generate vast amounts of data and the rise of cloud computing and the internet has enabled us to store and retrieve this information easily. The challenge has always been to enable people to use data and to communicate simply. There are a few visionaries that have mastered the art of data visualisation like Edward Tufte and Stephen Few. The future depends on the blend of this fusion of information and storytelling.

 

[Photo credit: IvanWalsh.com]


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Pagina Uno's curator insight, March 26, 2013 2:26 AM

Il futuro sta nella fusione di informazione, grafica e narrazione di storie. Il futuro è da scrivere, oltre le consuete categorie.

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Lance Weiler's The Art of Immersion/Building Storyworlds. Columbia U Lecture

Lance Weiler's The Art of Immersion/Building Storyworlds. Columbia U Lecture | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it

New Media Producing: Building Storyworlds: the art, craft & biz of storytelling - lecture from 9.12.12 class from Lance Weiler...


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Transmedia storytelling: what's the alternative to alternate reality games? | Transmedia for Education

Transmedia storytelling: what's the alternative to alternate reality games? | Transmedia for Education | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it
Rob Hinchcliffe: "Transmedia storytelling usually ends up in the shape of alternate reality games, which all-too-often become scheduled, passive on-rales experiences for the user. How can content creators make it more meaningful?

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Owning Your Story | UX Magazine

Owning Your Story | UX Magazine | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it

Owning Your Story

There’s a movement sweeping business, design, and communication right now. But it’s not a new technology, and it has nothing to do with people, patterns, or processes. What it has everything to do with is you and your story.

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Storytelling to Problem Solve - UX Booth | UX Booth

Storytelling to Problem Solve - UX Booth | UX Booth | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it

Storytelling has long been a tool for user experience designers, guiding how we craft an experience. What I’m proposing is a bit different: The use of face-to-face conversation to change how we empathize with our audience. It’s a skill we all have and, properly honed, designers can leverage it to better communicate in the digital world.

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Here's How to Listen to Your Customers & Go From Good to Great

Here's How to Listen to Your Customers & Go From Good to Great | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it

From Karen: Below is a review written by my fellow curator Jan Gordon for her Curation, Social Business, and Beyond Scoop.it. Both the article and Jan's review are great!

 

I re-scooped this piece from Jan because a foundation storytelling skill is listening -- and here is how listening and working with the unconscious and archetypes pays out (read below). Now if we could only get the dynamics of story sharing into the equation we'll be even better off!


Thanks Jan!

 

This piece was written by Bolivar J. Bueno for MarketingProfs. I selected it because I thought the suggestions were excellent.

 

Jan Gordon:

 

Whatever you're doing to build an audience, customer or client base, listening at deeper levels is crucial for your business success.

 

Engaging online with customers is not unlike real life. The difference is we have social media/networks and great tools to help us really get to know them and speak to their listening, then deliver solutions

 

Intro:

 

"Years of research have revealed that the single most important factor that separates the good companies from the great companies Adidas from Nike is the ability to listen to their customers. That's the starting poing".
 

 

Excerpt:

 

"Dominant organizations, are those that can discern meaning from the information given. In other words, they're doing more than listening. They're hearing. And they're deriving their direction from what they hear".


How, exactly, does such effective listening work?

 

Here is what caught my attention:


Understand the unconscious


**A vast majority of human experience, communication and thought take place on an unconscious level - this is the first step to listening to the customer.

 

**We're continually taking note of the enviornment around us - how people interact within that enviornment and what role we play as individuals

 

**That information has a profound role in guiding customer behavior

 

**Truly effective communication means being able to listen on

multiple levels to what is said and what is left unsaid



Access Archetypal Images: A single image is worth a thousand words for a simple reason:

 

**The unconscious mind does not bother with language. Symbols, pictures, and iconography speak directly to your customer's psyche,

 

**bypassing and transcending all other forms of communication to take on the leading role in influencing your customer.

 

Listening, then, also means understanding which archetypal images resonate most with your customers and are the most relevant to them.


Selected by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Business and Beyond"

 

Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/PA0xBk]


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janlgordon's comment, September 17, 2012 12:49 PM
Thanks Karen, love your feedback, made my day!!
Sean Goldie's curator insight, October 17, 2013 2:33 PM

We live in a world made of stories


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The Foundation of Powerful Digital Storytelling

The Foundation of Powerful Digital Storytelling | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it
The word storytelling consists of two parts: ‘story’ and ‘telling’, content and performance. To begin with the latter, on the Internet this is very different. In the traditi...

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How To Tell A Story -- Story Wars 10 Simple Strategies

This is a Change This PDF that you can view here:

http://changethis.com/manifesto/98.01.StoryWars/pdf/98.01.StoryWars.pdf 

 

I'm curating this because I like it and I don't like it -- and it is worth taking a look at the assumptions going on in this piece so we can get really smart.

 

This piece was put together by Jonathan Sachs, author of Winning The Story Wars. Sachs comes from the world of marketing and branding and this is reflected in his point of view.

 

Let's get what I don't like out of the way so I can chat about what I do like. Here is what puts my teeth on edge:


1. Sachs states that "we live in a world that has lost its connection to traditional myths and we are now trying to find new ones..." Welllllllll, if your slice of reality is the Hollywood, advertising, and branding world it is easy to get sucked into this notion. But we know from Jung, other psychologists, Folklorists, Anthroplogists, and neuroscience how this is not true. There is great irony in this "myth" that Sachs is perpetuating.


2. We are engaged in a war. Hmmmmm. Well, for millenium people have wanted to gain the attention of other people -- so nothing new there. Is this a war?  Could be. But if we are wanting to employ the power of storytelling to find solutions and create change as Sachs advocates, then war does not speak to the greater good but instead speaks to winners and losers where ongoing resentment is inherently built in. That sounds like the perpetuation of war -- same old same old. 

 

3. Sach's relationship to storytelling is still at the transactional level -- I'll tell you a story and you'll do what I want. While what he really wants it seems is storytelling at the transformational level. That requires a different mind-set and different story skills -- deep listening, engagement, story sharing, etc. And he completely ignores the relational level of storytelling.


4. Reliance on the Hero's Journey as the only story archetype to follow. Well, that's a narrow slice of reality and one geared towards youth. Yet other story archetypes are desperately needed: King/Queen, Trickster, Magician for example in order to affect change.

 

5. As a result, his 10 simple strategies stay at the transactional level with a few geared towards transformation (figure out what you stand for, declare your moral, reveal the moral). Now any great professional storyteller will tell you these that I've mentioned are essential for any compelling storytelling session. So they land in both worlds of transactional and transformational storytelling.


OK -- on to what I do like!


If you want to be heard, you'd better learn to tell better stories. The solutions to our significant problems these days depends on our ability to tell great stories and inspire people to think differently. Storytelling does not take long to learn, but it does take a lifetime to master, Know what a story is and is not Our abilitiy to disseminate stories is greater now than in the past -- because of technology. That is just a reminder to expend your use of different channels in sharing your stories that are now available to us.

 

Enough! Go read this piece yourself and decide what you think about it. It's a quick read.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 


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Meri Walker's comment, September 20, 2012 1:15 PM
Well, Karen! You made my day offering this terrific new Scoop. I'm enriched by the way you think, Karen. Especially about story... I guess we get really "bent" in a certain way by anthropological training and it's still pretty rare to find others who are looking through the kinds of filters you and I have installed in Mind. De-light-ful learning with and from you!
Jane Dunnewold's comment, April 8, 2013 4:42 PM
I'm behind the curve on this one, being new to scoop it - but as a teacher/artist I have to agree with your observation that delving into other archetypes would present rich opportunities to "language" storytelling in lots of environments. I use archetypes to get at the fears and struggles artists face in my workshops - and they aren't all about the hero's path! The Damsel in Distress is one that comes to mind...
Karen Dietz's comment, April 8, 2013 4:56 PM
I agree Jane. Archetypes can be so helpful in many ways. One of the ones I love for artists is the Trickster archetype, and the Magician. LOL on the 'damsel in distress'! Time to go put my 'big girl' panties on and deal with the next challenge :)
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Tell Me a Story -- 8 Tips for Powerful Narratives That Drive Social Impact

Tell Me a Story -- 8 Tips for Powerful Narratives That Drive Social Impact | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it

Recently, everywhere I go, people ask me how to tell a more effective story. Advocates, colleagues, and clients observe that the organizations that achieve policy goals, get transformative grants, or seize the market’s interest are the ones that 1) have the resources to disseminate their story, and 2) just tell the better story. I would argue that the real winners are the organizations that actually manage to tell a story at all.

 

What a great article by Eric Friedenwald-Fishman for Stanford Social Innovation Review.

 

I like that he immediately identifies that many organizations, when they think they are telling a story, actually are not. So so true.

 

I also like that he mentions that organizations who do manage to tell a story well, also spend the resources needed to disseminate it. Too many businesses forget this essential piece.

 

The 8 tips he shares that create a powerful story that moves people to action are solid. What is unique is his tip The Power of the People -- where he advocates "Amplifying the voices of the people most affected by an issue increases the story’s authenticity and relevance. Including quotes, testimonials, eyewitness accounts, and personal narrative makes the story more interesting."  This point is often unrecognized in org story circles.

 

All in all, I like how Eric languages these tips -- many will be familiar to you, but hearing them in a new way always opens our minds to new insights or ideas.

 

In the end, the author asks how to put these tips to good use. He offers 4 questions to get us started that again, are different than what you typically read.

 

Enjoy this piece!

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


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Becoming Bi-Cultural Makes You More Creative

Becoming Bi-Cultural Makes You More Creative | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it
The value of living in more than one culture.

 

Innovation provides a key path to business success. In the 1970s, it may have seemed inconceivable that computers would some day become just another commodity. Just 40 years later, most manufacturers of computers are competing to produce the fastest cheapest machines, and so they operate on small profit margins.


The exception to this trend comes from innovative companies like Apple. Companies that bring out new and exciting projects capture people’s imaginations and ultimately people are willing to pay a premium for their new products.

 

Because of the key role of innovation in generating new business, companies are on the lookout for people who are likely to bring a creative spirit to their work. A paper by Carmit Tadmor, Adam Galinsky, and William Maddux in the September, 2012 issue of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology explores how living abroad can influence people’s creativity. This research expands on a previous paper involving some of these researchers.

 

When people live abroad for an extended period of time, there are three possibilities for their relationship to their host culture. One possibility is that they will retain their original cultural identity and keep themselves separate from their host culture. A second possibility is that they will assimilate to the host culture and lose their original cultural identity. A third possibility is that they will become bicultural, and will retain a strong tie both to their original culture and to the host culture....


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A Presentation App That Forces You To Tell Better Stories

A Presentation App That Forces You To Tell Better Stories | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it
While you’re probably not guilty of mucking up complex geopolitical strategy with your bad slides, chances are you’ve made some crappy ones--or, at the very least, been subjected to some--at one point or another. So the appeal of Haiku Deck, a free app for the iPad, should be clear. As founder Adam Tratt explained to me: "We wanted to make it impossible to create ugly [slides]."

 

The app, as its name suggests, is all about brevity, enabling users to make clean, concise slide shows--or decks--with a heavily streamlined feature set. Using it is fiendishly simple: You enter a few keywords of text onto a slide, and the app searches a database of over 35 million Creative Commons images that suit your subject. If your text says "Fierce Dedication," you might get an artful shot of a tiger or a football team to use as the slide’s background (though you can always use a photo of your own). Finding that compelling image for you, Tratt says, is one of Haiku Deck’s key achievements. "People spend a ton of time doing this manually … so we thought we could really delight our users if we made the process just happen automagically, and then embed the Creative Commons attribution right in the deck."


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Why Stories Sell | Neuromarketing

Why Stories Sell | Neuromarketing | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it
We know that anecdotes can be a convincing way to sell a product, particularly if the story is told by someone we trust. (See Your Brain on Stories.) Evolutionary psychology may offer a reason. Human brains evolved when we had just two ways to learn about dangers and rewards in their environment: personal experience, and communication from other trusted humans.

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The Power of Storytelling | USAID Impact

The Power of Storytelling | USAID Impact | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it

The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) knows that powerful narratives can set the stage for positive action. From the general public to aid experts in the field, the stories and struggles in the developing play a big role in compelling the general public and aid experts to find solutions to global challenges. Telling these stories is not only an expression of our American values but demonstrates how working together to solve these challenges benefits all of us.


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What Does Platform Agnostic Mean? [#transmedia]

What Does Platform Agnostic Mean? [#transmedia] | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it

Sparksheet: "Speak to a film or television producer, writer or marketer and they might casually drop the term “transmedia,” a close cousin of platform agnosticism which is coming into its own as an industry. Last year we attended a conference in San Francisco all about transmedia" ...

 

Pictured: Henry Jenkins


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