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- Everyone - every company, organization has a story. Tell it, we all can learn and benefit from your story but be authentic, real
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Innovative Company Award Winner, Guo Pei Interview Exclusive by Fashion Studio Magazine

Innovative Company Award Winner, Guo Pei Interview Exclusive by Fashion Studio Magazine | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it

In trying circumstances, Guo Pei, now one of China's top fashion designers, became famous for her extravagantly made gowns that are close to perfection.


In 1997, she established Beijing Rose Studio, which made her the pioneer of Chinese Haute Couture.

In an exclusive interview for Fashion Studio Magazine, Guo Pei discusses the Chinese fashion market and her successful journey as a couture designer. She also talks about her unique approach to fashion design and reveals some of her ambitious plans for the future.


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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, February 10, 1:42 PM

Fast Company selected Guo Pei as one of their 2014 Innovative Company award winners.  She's in the top 25 on the list for reviving the art of Chinese embroidery and craftsmanship. ~  D

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The Science Behind Why Great Stories Spread

The Science Behind Why Great Stories Spread | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it
In the second of a two-part series Jonathan Gottschall discusses the unique power stories have to change minds and the key to their effectiveness.

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Linda Alexander's curator insight, October 21, 2013 5:13 PM

This is important data for teachers to understand in terms of embedded learning and understanding.  

John Michel's curator insight, October 22, 2013 2:36 AM

 When we enter into a story, we enter into an altered mental state--a state of high suggestibility.

Charlie Dare's curator insight, October 22, 2013 4:55 PM

Many songs in particular Country or blues ballards tell a story often of love lost like "Me and Bobby Magee "..."

And so the discussion continues. Jonathan Gottschall writes his second blog post in his series about why/how storytelling works so well for businesses (and in general).

 

He does a good job in laying that foundation.

 

I have two thoughts for readers as they check out this post:

 

1. Gottschalk talks about story structure. Of course you have to know story structures to craft a good story. But structure alone won't make you successful IMHO. There's a whole lot more going on in telling a compelling story and structure is only one piece. Ask any creative writer! There are many different formulas. Most biz folks in the US are completely unaware that different groups/cultures have different story structures than what we see broadcasted on the Internet. Which in a global marketplace has huge significance! I'm not anti-story structure -- I just want us to understand its role better.

 

2. Stories and manipulation. Yes we are being influenced by stories -- and have always been. Yes we are being manipulated all the time. Yes, at some level we know this. No, access to information via the Internet and social media does not innoculate against this. Which is one reason why consumers are getting much more savvy about purchasing from companies who are socially and environmentally conscious.

 

Gottschalk focuses mostly on ads in this post. Ads are only one type of business storytelling however. He asks questions at the end, "Is storytelling really locked into a master formula?" No. 

 

Another question he asks is, "Hasn't the digital revolution paved the way for a new kind of storytelling?" and "Is it time for story 2.0?" LOL -- both remain to be seen and I look forward to the next post!

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for the Just Story It curation on business storytelling"

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We’re Marketers, Not Soldiers: How Combative Competition Is Killing Creativity

We’re Marketers, Not Soldiers: How Combative Competition Is Killing Creativity | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it
Why do marketers revel in military jargon? Must we really rally troops to deploy conquest ads or fire quick hits of bleeding-edge apps?

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ManagingAmericans's comment, February 15, 2013 9:45 PM
Thanks Karen, insightful indeed.
Oakville Deals's curator insight, February 16, 2013 11:56 AM

This is an article that I was going to write. I think it is an American thing.

Karen Dietz's comment, February 18, 2013 9:05 AM
Glad you enjoyed the article and found it useful!
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Storytelling for social change — Starks Communications, LLC

Storytelling for social change — Starks Communications, LLC | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it
An excellent article in the February issue of Sojourners magazine discusses “leadership storytelling” – or public narrative – as a vehicle for social change. The author of the article, Eboo Patel, founder of the Interfaith Youth ...

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Karen Dietz's curator insight, January 17, 2013 2:23 PM

I love this article because it points to 3 specific stories that need to be shared in order for social change to happen.


If you are a business or nonprofit focused on making a difference in the world and advocating for social change, these 3 stories are critical to craft and tell.


As the author Cynthia Starks says, the stories need to be:

  1. The story of Self -- why YOU are passionate about this cause. This is the story that most people/organizations ignore. But if people don't know who you are and why you are involved, minimal trust and influence will be built. 
  2. The story of Us -- which is a story of inclusiveness. In crafting social change stories, people want to come together in community. 
  3. The story of Now -- which is a story that builds urgency and galvanizes action.


This is a quick article with more insights than I shared. So go read it :)


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

Mohammed Omar Faruque Masud's comment, January 17, 2013 5:11 PM
Sweet Words of Love!
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How To Tell A Story -- Story Wars 10 Simple Strategies

This is a Change This PDF that you can view here:

http://changethis.com/manifesto/98.01.StoryWars/pdf/98.01.StoryWars.pdf ;

 

I'm curating this because I like it and I don't like it -- and it is worth taking a look at the assumptions going on in this piece so we can get really smart.

 

This piece was put together by Jonathan Sachs, author of Winning The Story Wars. Sachs comes from the world of marketing and branding and this is reflected in his point of view.

 

Let's get what I don't like out of the way so I can chat about what I do like. Here is what puts my teeth on edge:


1. Sachs states that "we live in a world that has lost its connection to traditional myths and we are now trying to find new ones..." Welllllllll, if your slice of reality is the Hollywood, advertising, and branding world it is easy to get sucked into this notion. But we know from Jung, other psychologists, Folklorists, Anthroplogists, and neuroscience how this is not true. There is great irony in this "myth" that Sachs is perpetuating.

 

2. We are engaged in a war. Hmmmmm. Well, for millenium people have wanted to gain the attention of other people -- so nothing new there. Is this a war?  Could be. But if we are wanting to employ the power of storytelling to find solutions and create change as Sachs advocates, then war does not speak to the greater good but instead speaks to winners and losers where ongoing resentment is inherently built in. That sounds like the perpetuation of war -- same old same old. 

 

3. Sach's relationship to storytelling is still at the transactional level -- I'll tell you a story and you'll do what I want. While what he really wants it seems is storytelling at the transformational level. That requires a different mind-set and different story skills -- deep listening, engagement, story sharing, etc. And he completely ignores the relational level of storytelling.

 

4. Reliance on the Hero's Journey as the only story archetype to follow. Well, that's a narrow slice of reality and one geared towards youth. Yet other story archetypes are desperately needed: King/Queen, Trickster, Magician for example in order to affect change.

 

5. As a result, his 10 simple strategies stay at the transactional level with a few geared towards transformation (figure out what you stand for, declare your moral, reveal the moral). Now any great professional storyteller will tell you these that I've mentioned are essential for any compelling storytelling session. So they land in both worlds of transactional and transformational storytelling.

 

OK -- on to what I do like!

 

If you want to be heard, you'd better learn to tell better stories. The solutions to our significant problems these days depends on our ability to tell great stories and inspire people to think differently. Storytelling does not take long to learn, but it does take a lifetime to master, Know what a story is and is not Our abilitiy to disseminate stories is greater now than in the past -- because of technology. That is just a reminder to expend your use of different channels in sharing your stories that are now available to us.

 

Enough! Go read this piece yourself and decide what you think about it. It's a quick read.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


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Meri Walker's comment, September 20, 2012 10:15 AM
Well, Karen! You made my day offering this terrific new Scoop. I'm enriched by the way you think, Karen. Especially about story... I guess we get really "bent" in a certain way by anthropological training and it's still pretty rare to find others who are looking through the kinds of filters you and I have installed in Mind. De-light-ful learning with and from you!
Jane Dunnewold's comment, April 8, 2013 1:42 PM
I'm behind the curve on this one, being new to scoop it - but as a teacher/artist I have to agree with your observation that delving into other archetypes would present rich opportunities to "language" storytelling in lots of environments. I use archetypes to get at the fears and struggles artists face in my workshops - and they aren't all about the hero's path! The Damsel in Distress is one that comes to mind...
Karen Dietz's comment, April 8, 2013 1:56 PM
I agree Jane. Archetypes can be so helpful in many ways. One of the ones I love for artists is the Trickster archetype, and the Magician. LOL on the 'damsel in distress'! Time to go put my 'big girl' panties on and deal with the next challenge :)
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How To Tell A Story -- Story Wars 10 Simple Strategies

This is a Change This PDF that you can view here:

http://changethis.com/manifesto/98.01.StoryWars/pdf/98.01.StoryWars.pdf ;

 

I'm curating this because I like it and I don't like it -- and it is worth taking a look at the assumptions going on in this piece so we can get really smart.

 

This piece was put together by Jonathan Sachs, author of Winning The Story Wars. Sachs comes from the world of marketing and branding and this is reflected in his point of view.

 

Let's get what I don't like out of the way so I can chat about what I do like. Here is what puts my teeth on edge:


1. Sachs states that "we live in a world that has lost its connection to traditional myths and we are now trying to find new ones..." Welllllllll, if your slice of reality is the Hollywood, advertising, and branding world it is easy to get sucked into this notion. But we know from Jung, other psychologists, Folklorists, Anthroplogists, and neuroscience how this is not true. There is great irony in this "myth" that Sachs is perpetuating.


2. We are engaged in a war. Hmmmmm. Well, for millenium people have wanted to gain the attention of other people -- so nothing new there. Is this a war?  Could be. But if we are wanting to employ the power of storytelling to find solutions and create change as Sachs advocates, then war does not speak to the greater good but instead speaks to winners and losers where ongoing resentment is inherently built in. That sounds like the perpetuation of war -- same old same old. 

 

3. Sach's relationship to storytelling is still at the transactional level -- I'll tell you a story and you'll do what I want. While what he really wants it seems is storytelling at the transformational level. That requires a different mind-set and different story skills -- deep listening, engagement, story sharing, etc. And he completely ignores the relational level of storytelling.


4. Reliance on the Hero's Journey as the only story archetype to follow. Well, that's a narrow slice of reality and one geared towards youth. Yet other story archetypes are desperately needed: King/Queen, Trickster, Magician for example in order to affect change.

 

5. As a result, his 10 simple strategies stay at the transactional level with a few geared towards transformation (figure out what you stand for, declare your moral, reveal the moral). Now any great professional storyteller will tell you these that I've mentioned are essential for any compelling storytelling session. So they land in both worlds of transactional and transformational storytelling.


OK -- on to what I do like!


If you want to be heard, you'd better learn to tell better stories. The solutions to our significant problems these days depends on our ability to tell great stories and inspire people to think differently. Storytelling does not take long to learn, but it does take a lifetime to master, Know what a story is and is not Our abilitiy to disseminate stories is greater now than in the past -- because of technology. That is just a reminder to expend your use of different channels in sharing your stories that are now available to us.

 

Enough! Go read this piece yourself and decide what you think about it. It's a quick read.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


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Meri Walker's comment, September 20, 2012 10:15 AM
Well, Karen! You made my day offering this terrific new Scoop. I'm enriched by the way you think, Karen. Especially about story... I guess we get really "bent" in a certain way by anthropological training and it's still pretty rare to find others who are looking through the kinds of filters you and I have installed in Mind. De-light-ful learning with and from you!
Jane Dunnewold's comment, April 8, 2013 1:42 PM
I'm behind the curve on this one, being new to scoop it - but as a teacher/artist I have to agree with your observation that delving into other archetypes would present rich opportunities to "language" storytelling in lots of environments. I use archetypes to get at the fears and struggles artists face in my workshops - and they aren't all about the hero's path! The Damsel in Distress is one that comes to mind...
Karen Dietz's comment, April 8, 2013 1:56 PM
I agree Jane. Archetypes can be so helpful in many ways. One of the ones I love for artists is the Trickster archetype, and the Magician. LOL on the 'damsel in distress'! Time to go put my 'big girl' panties on and deal with the next challenge :)
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Five types of leadership storytelling & when to use each

Five types of leadership storytelling & when to use each | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it

Just how many types of stories are there, you ask? The answer is, as usual, it depends who you ask. Various storytelling aficionados categorize stories in different ways, and there are no hard and fast rules.

 

These are overviews of each (read the full article for more details and prompts to help you come up with each type of story):

1. Introducing me

2. Conveying values

3. Teaching

4. Jumpstarting action

5. Inspiring

 

Here's the link to the full article: http://www.internal-monologue.com/2012/07/careful-around-campfire-five-types-of.html ;

 

These 5 broad categories and the examples shared in each are really good and will build a good foundation for leadership storytelling. According to Paul Smith in his forthcoming book on leadership storytelling "Lead With A Story" (August 20112), there are actually 21 different categories/applications for leaders to know about and use.

 

But this article brings clarity to the topic and will definitely get you started!

 

Thank you to fellow curator Gimli Goose for this article!


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3 Innovative 2014 Leadership Trends featuring Fred Keller, CEO of Cascade Engineering, B Corporation leader

3 Innovative 2014 Leadership Trends featuring Fred Keller, CEO of Cascade Engineering, B Corporation leader | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it

What innovative leadership methods are being taught in business schools and implemented by CEOs in 2014? Here are three: 1) unlocking hidden strengths, 2) giving second chances and 3) implementing democracy.
 

Excerpts:
 

1. Unlocking hidden strengths


A good example …is in the leadership style of Whole Foods co-CEO Walter Robb. "He draws on individuals' strengths in a way that is firm yet deferential and open," White says. "He's able to be collaborative but is also clear in his directions."

 

 

 _________________
   

… it hasn't been easy…{but] guess what? …it made our culture more positive throughout...

and it turns out to be good for business."
   

_________________

 

2. Giving second chances
 

Fred Keller, founder and CEO of Grand Rapids, Michigan-based plastics manufacturing company Cascade Engineering, has led his multimillion-dollar business based on a quote from 18th-century theologian and social reformer John Wesley: "Do all the good you can."
       

Cascade is the largest manufacturing business certified as a B Corporation, which means it has made a commitment to solving social and environmental problems and meets a lengthy set of performance, accountability, and transparency standards.

      

Keller and Cascade's signature program is "Welfare to Career," where the company brings aboard people who have been on government assistance for long periods. Keller says the program has saved the state of Michigan millions of dollars by getting people off the welfare rolls.

     

… it hasn't been easy…{but] guess what? …it made our culture more positive throughout for everyone. And it turns out to be good for business."



______________
   
….. our employees feel like they contribute more than they ever did at other companies and are a part of a big story."

    

______________



   

3. Implementing democracy


Avinoam Nowogrodski, CEO of project-management software company Clarizen, says the command-and-control style of leadership popular in decades past doesn't work for today's business environment. "People want a voice, people want to participate, and this requires democratic principles," he says.


….. our employees feel like they contribute more than they ever did at other companies and are a part of a big story."

Related tools from Deb:

 

Receive Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE curation streams @Deb Nystrom, REVELN, sent once a month via email, available for free here, via REVELN Tools.

 


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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, January 31, 1:08 PM

These three stories illustrate the changing nature of leadership from the last millennium.  Highly engineered, inflexible, bureaucratic systems are giving way to more systemic, humanistic systems with emphasis on strengths, community and national values, vs. the tunnel vision values of the profit focus of the last century.   ~  Deb

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, January 31, 9:16 PM

The largest B Corporation in the USA is Frank Keller's company, Cascade Engineering.

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Dealing With Change & The Value Of Stories

Dealing With Change & The Value Of Stories | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it

"We are vehemently faithful to our own view of the world, our story. We want to know what new story we’re stepping into before we exit the old one. We don’t want an exit if we don’t know exactly where it is going to take us, even – or perhaps especially – in an emergency. This is so, I hasten to add, whether we are patients or psychoanalysts."


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Esther Coronel De Iberkleid's comment, August 10, 2013 5:59 PM
Great article SHAWN COYNE! Thank you very much. Even though it is difficult for anyone to say what he would have done in an emergency situation like 9/11 since the emotions have to be felt to fire the engine and take any action, it is very interesting to still reflect and think about these type of situations for sure. What I believe is the most important thing for us human beings is to understand the value of life more than the value of things. Wealth is related with that fact, because wealth is related to freedom, love, compassion and understanding of the purpose of our own life
Karen Dietz's curator insight, September 4, 2013 1:27 PM

Many thanks to fellow curator Gregg Morris for finding and sharing this article! 


I'm working with an organizaiton right  now in the throws of huge change on multiple levels. It is a wild time and helping them find, frame, and share their stories is just beginning.


This article is a terrific place to start for thinking about the stories people need to hear when facing change. And the story shared in the post is powerful indeed.


In fact, this article fits very nicely into another recent article I posted by Rafe Martin on the importance of folklore and stories. Stories -- specifically folk tales -- help us respond to change, providing mental structures and pathways for us to follow when change happens.


As we all know, change is constant. Storytelling is a huge help. I hope you gain lots of great insights from this article and it gets you thinking about your next steps.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

Krista Finstad-Milion's curator insight, October 6, 2013 6:21 AM

The Kübler-Ross Change curve is a tool you can store in your back pocket and pull our to help others get on with what is essential. You can also use it to coach yourself through the challenges of dealing with changes beyond your control.  In the ICN Executive MBA change management module, we combine this tool with others such as story-telling in a co-learning approach.

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Set your counter-productive strategies out to sea with story

Set your counter-productive strategies out to sea with story | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it
My husband recently recounted an organizational change process that he had observed at a European client. Interestingly, it was based upon the story of the ancient ritual of a Viking funeral. In th...

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Karen Dietz's curator insight, February 10, 2013 7:12 PM

What a great piece (not long) about storytelling and organizational change.


I really like how the author Marla Gottschalk talks about how storytelling can get the ball rolling when an company needs to change. Especially when there is not a critical event 'igniting' the need for change.


I also like how Gottschalk reminds us to honor the past as we embark on change, give the change the deference it deserves (honor what is happening), and add pomp. These 3 points are often forgotten in the rush or push to change.


There are nice insights here that can help us all.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her content curation on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Digital Storytelling Manifesto | Amanda Lewan

Digital Storytelling Manifesto | Amanda Lewan | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it
Your story is important.(Digital Storytelling Manifesto | Amanda Lewan http://t.co/bg8gPYMs...)...

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Karen Dietz's curator insight, November 29, 2012 7:26 AM

Somehow my original review got blown away by computer goblins last night! I know Scoop.it has a new user interface and it looks like they are still working out a few bugs.


So let me tell you why I posted this manifesto -- because it is a great reminder that even our smallest stories have the power to inspire others and change the world. Yes -- change the world.


We often take our stories for granted. We share them in conversation and don't think much of them.  But all stories have 'work' to do in the world -- whether they are big hairy audacious stories or quiet little ones.


Print out this poster and keep it handy. It's a terrific reminder of the power of all YOUR stories to make a difference in the world.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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Policy experts need to lead by storytelling -- fab lessons for us all

Policy experts need to lead by storytelling -- fab lessons for us all | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it
The best way for a leader to persuade people to accept a counterintuitive health message is to craft a compelling narrative.

 

What a great story and insights this article contains. With lessons for us all in leadership, marketing, and social change.

 

Here is Kenneth Lin, a leader in public health, who shares his story of resigning his position because of clashing narratives. And his frustration with the truth narrative losing out. But he doesn't give up. He keeps going, and shares his insights about grand narratives, leadership, and perseverence with us.

 

For example -- are you telling micro or macro narratives? If you are telling micro narratives and expecting social change, it won't happen.

 

And how do you share a narrative that counters people's beliefs when those beliefs contain inaccurate assumptions? Every leader and social change agent wants to know the answer to that one.

 

Lin might not solve all of these problems in this blog post, but his insights about leadership, stories, and social change are worth the read and give us hope when meeting roadblocks.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


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Center for Digital Storytelling - Introducing StoryLab

Center for Digital Storytelling - Introducing StoryLab | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it

StoryLab is a new hub for innovation with a big aim: to radically improve public conversation in the U.S. and around the world. Everybody talks about it, but CDS actually knows how to do it.

To change the world, you first have to change the story.

 

Here is an organization I think everyone should know about -- the Center for Digital Storytelling (CDS). They have been, and continue to provide world-class training in digital storytelling grounded in the power of a story dynamics to make a difference.

 

They are launching a new project -- StoryLab -- which aims to engage people in changing stories that keep us stuck, limited -- like our political discourse, violence, aids, etc. -- and expressing those stories that eliven and enoble us. Truly great work.

 

So why am I curating this and what has it got to do with business? Well -- imagine applying these same principles and ideas to the stories you share about your business, engaging your organization in this kind of deep story sharing that changes the world, and engaging with customers to create profound partnerships that make a difference.

 

Hmmmm -- I think there are lots of opportunities here and StoryLab is showing us the way.

 

The video on the StoryLab page also mentions supporting the project through donations. That is up to you. I have no affiliation with the Center other than our mutual love of story and its transformative power, and an amazing conversation I had a few years ago with founder Joe Lambert.

 

IMHO, thank heavens they are doing this project. There are so many others in the field of story that also work with story for transformative change. Let's keep hooking up. It is in this spirit that I bring you StoryLab.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


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Karen du Toit's comment, September 11, 2012 12:38 AM
Great curation, Karen!
Karen Dietz's comment, September 24, 2012 12:11 PM
Thank you Karen! I'm glad you like the curation :) Have a great week.