Stocks in Europe Are Unchanged as U.S. Jobless Claims Decline
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Financial Tips Corliss Group online magazine: Put Yourself in Potential Investors

Financial Tips Corliss Group online magazine: Put Yourself in Potential Investors | Stocks in Europe Are Unchanged as U.S. Jobless Claims Decline | Scoop.it
Ask that essential question: Would you put money into your business concept? Make sure your pitch explains why.
SIlvia Ricci's insight:

When it comes to securing investment, the overwhelming challenge for most entrepreneurs comes from trying to determine how to make a convincing pitch. Fortunately, it does not have to be that difficult.

 

As an entrepreneur and MBA who was schooled in traditional investment raising, I have always been told that to find investment capital for your business, you needed a comprehensive business plan, detailing (among other things) S.W.O.T. (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats), operations and marketing plans, and financial models showing projections, cash flow, return on investment, risk analysis, etc.

 

These days, I am working on a new startup idea with Startup.SC, a South Carolina startup business incubator that focuses on scalable technology companies. What I have learned over the past few weeks is that although there is no exact formula for successfully developing a pitch, start by asking yourself this simple question:

 

If you were an investor, what would you want to see in a pitch?

 

Quite simply, put yourself in the shoes of the investors you are pitching and focus on these things:

 

1. Customer acquisition, not revenue.

 

More than revenue projections, investors want to know how you are going to capture and retain customers. In a roundabout way, it is essentially the same thing (both deal with revenue), but while revenue projections can be formulaic and are for the most part completely pulled from the air, what speaks to investors is a clear, effective and executable plan for capturing customers and keeping them.

 

2. The jockey, not the horse.

 

Investors bet on jockeys, not horses. What investors want to see is that you are committed and able to fulfill the task of implementing your plan through challenges as well as successes, and that you are the type of person who is going to see it through to the end. Ultimately, a great idea is worthless without great execution. Prove that you are the person to carry out the vision.

 

3. Flexibility, not recipes.

 

You may have an idea of how you want to structure your company and your investments, but understand that every investor has different expectations, as do their partners and stakeholders.

 

4. Remember: Nobody wants to see you fail.

 

When negotiating with investors, entrepreneurs often get stuck in the wicked mind game of trying to determine who is making out the best. In reality, success depends mutually on two things: your passion and capabilities and your investors' money.

 

In the end, everyone loses if you fail, so it is in nobody’s best interest to create a situation that erodes any chance of success.

 

 

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Kuolema Tokio ja moderni Japani: todellisuutta tai harhaa?

Kuolema Tokio ja moderni Japani: todellisuutta tai harhaa? | Stocks in Europe Are Unchanged as U.S. Jobless Claims Decline | Scoop.it
The demise of Tokyo and modern Japan: reality or an illusion? Kanako Itamae and Pierre Leblanc Modern Tokyo Times Once more depressing figures released indicate the demise of Tokyo and Japan by 210...
SIlvia Ricci's insight:

http://moderntokyotimes.com/2013/10/05/the-demise-of-tokyo-and-modern-japan-reality-or-an-illusion/

 

The demise of Tokyo and modern Japan: reality or an illusion?

 

Jälleen kerran masentavaa luvut osoittavat kuoleman Tokiossa ja Japanissa vuoteen 2100 mennessä, jonka mukaan väestöstä on totaalisesti siitä tänään. Tämä on karu varoitus mukaan toinen dramaattinen tutkimus, joka näkee vain staattisia ja kuolemaisillaan Japanissa, joka kieltäytyy toteuttaa todellista sosiaalista politiikkaa.

 

Yksi mielenkiintoinen osa tutkimuksen, joka on kielletty on "maallinen yhteiskunta" olemisen reaalisuus yli riippuvainen nykyaikaa, materialismi, abortti ja muita näkökohtia "uuden maailman". On selvää, että Japani kohtaavat ongelmia, jotka liittyvät syntyvyyden ja tämä uusin tutkimus liittyy tähän. Samaan aikaan liittyviä kysymyksiä viestinnässä japanilainen yhteiskunta (sosiaalinen peruuttaminen), itsemurha ja muiden alueiden sosiaalinen romahdus on keskityttävä.

 

Tietenkin kysymykset liittyvät työtuntimäärää, kalleus lasten kasvatukseen, uusia moderneja keinoja elämää ja muita monimutkaisia tekijöitä; ovat kaikki repiä toisistaan pienenemisen tässä maassa. Valitettavasti Japanin hallitus näyttää halua auttaa ihmisiä, jotka haluavat enemmän kuin yksi tai kaksi lasta mutta jotka tuntevat rasittaa vuoksi taloudellisia vaikeuksia, joita tästä.

 

Tämä synkkä tutkimuksen, joka tehtiin seitsemän tutkijoiden ja joukko byrokraattien mukaan Tokio väestö vähenee 7.13 miljoonaa vuonna 2100 nykyinen Mark yli 13 miljoonaa ihmistä. Tämä johtuu hyvin dramaattisia Tokiossa ja muihin suuriin kaupunkeihin kuten Osaka ja Nagoya ovat tämän kansakunnan selkäranka. Toisin kuin monilla maaseutualueilla joka jo kärsii väestö vähenee.

 

Myös tämä ei ole loppua uurtaen koska 2100 on ennustettu, että yli 65 ikäryhmä osuus noin 45 prosenttia koko väestöstä Tokyo. Tämä osoittaa vieläkin vakavampi kriisi pitkä kun 2100, joka näkisi jatkuva kuolema Tokio Japani itse.

 

Lue lisää:
http://www.behance.net/gallery/The-Corliss-Group-on-Ehdokas-varoittaa-petos-aeaenestykse/11279631
https://www.ibm.com/developerworks/community/blogs/305fb7b5-a688-4508-bc5a-addd8d960e01/?lang=es

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Stocks in Europe Are Unchanged as U.S. Jobless Claims Decline

Stocks in Europe Are Unchanged as U.S. Jobless Claims Decline | Stocks in Europe Are Unchanged as U.S. Jobless Claims Decline | Scoop.it
European stocks were unchanged as data showing the number of Americans filing jobless claims unexpectedly fell last week offset investor concern that budget wrangling in Washington will lead to a government shutdown.
SIlvia Ricci's insight:

European stocks were unchanged as data showing the number of Americans filing jobless claims unexpectedly fell last week offset investor concern that budget wrangling in Washington will lead to a government shutdown.

Ladbrokes (LAD) Plc plunged to its lowest price in almost a year after issuing a profit warning for its digital division. Thomas Cook Group Plc slid 6.6 percent after it said winter bookings have slowed. Hennes & Mauritz AB (HMB), Europe’s second-biggest clothing retailer, rose to its highest price after posting third-quarter profit that beat analysts’ estimates.

The Stoxx Europe 600 Index was unchanged at 313.02 at the close of trading. The gauge has dropped 0.4 percent so far this week amid concern that U.S. politicians will fail to approve a federal budget for the new financial year. It has still climbed 5.3 percent in September as the Federal Reserve refrained from reducing its monthly asset purchases, and has surged 9.8 percent since the end of June, heading for the biggest quarterly gain in four years.

Read More Stocks in Europe Are Unchanged as U.S. Jobless Claims Decline: http://www.businessweek.com/news/2013-09-26/european-stock-index-futures-little-changed-before-u-dot-s-dot-job-data

More articles in: http://www.elderlawanswers.com/elder-law-attorneys/Marie-Corliss/attId/8059/locId/638

http://fi.yelp.fi/biz/the-corliss-group-southampton

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Between a rock and hard place | Otago Daily Times Online News : Otago, South Island, New Zealand & International News

Between a rock and hard place | Otago Daily Times Online News : Otago, South Island, New Zealand & International News | Stocks in Europe Are Unchanged as U.S. Jobless Claims Decline | Scoop.it
One of a handful of Britain's remaining possessions, Gibraltar is an interesting anachronism says Gillian Vine.
SIlvia Ricci's insight:

Corliss Group Online Financial Mag Hong Kong  Between a rock and hard place

 

One of a handful of Britain's remaining possessions, Gibraltar is an interesting anachronism says Gillian Vine.

Last year, sabre-rattling Spaniards soured relations with Britain, saying it was time they had Gibraltar back.

No you can't have it, said the British Government, supported by most of Gibraltar's 29,500 citizens, who rallied around the slogan ''Let no-one dare untie this knot''.       

                                           

The Spanish response was border checks with consequently long queues and delays, so I was pleased to come into Gibraltar by sea, during a port-hopping Mediterranean cruise.

But how did the Brits acquire this 6.7sq km chunk of Spain?

                                                    

In a sense, it was Spain's own fault, or rather that of King Carlos II, who died childless in 1700.

He had nominated as his successor his 16-year-old great-nephew, Philip, Duke of Anjou, who duly was crowned with the support of his grandfather, French King Louis XIV.

                                                        

It sounded fairly straightforward but another of Louis' grandsons, Austria's Archduke Charles, also fancied the Spanish throne.

Britain, Holland and Portugal joined the Austrians in getting behind Charles and they fought it out.

                                                           

The Spanish War of Succession was won by Austria and her allies, although one has to wonder what the point was, as Philip became king after all.

Admittedly, it was under a deal whereby he gave up all claims to the French throne, while the long-term winner was probably Britain, which was handed Gibraltar in 1713 as part of the Treaty of Utrecht.

 

Its location overlooking the Strait of Gibraltar meant the new territory was ideally situated as a military base.

The Battle of Trafalgar took place off Point Trafalgar, some 60km from Gibraltar, in October 1805.

 

After the defeat of a 33-strong French and Spanish fleet by 27 Royal Navy vessels, under the command of Admiral Horatio Nelson, wounded seamen were taken to Gibraltar.

However, as headstones in the little Trafalgar Cemetery mutely testify, not all the wounded survived.

 

Nelson died during the battle and his body, preserved in a barrel of brandy, was taken ashore at Gibraltar before being transferred to England for a state funeral.

Gibraltar was of strategic importance to the British during World War 2 and despite Adolf Hitler urging Spain to grab back the territory, the Spanish - who now undoubtedly regret their inaction - stayed neutral.

 

British military leaders ordered the construction of a network of tunnels inside the Rock of Gibraltar to provide secure accommodation and storage.

The idea wasn't new, for as early as 1782 defensive tunnels had been dug and even before that, there were stories that the Rock was hollow, probably based on the existence of St Michael's Cave, an immense limestone cavern where Neolithic skulls and rock drawings have been found.

 

This cave was utilised during World War 2, too, with a hospital set up there.

Two-hour tours of the tunnel complex and cave are available and a combined ticket is £8 ($NZ16) per person.

 

My father-in-law, a Royal Navy signalman, was stationed on Gibraltar during World War 2 and described being left perched halfway up the Rock during an enemy attack, watching his ship sailing away without him.

 

Seeing the old signals station on an exposed site high up the Rock brought home to me how vulnerable he must have felt, but he survived and rejoined his ship some time later.

A ride on the cable car to the top of the Rock (£8.50 one way, or £10.50 return) is a must for any visitor.

 

I opted for the return but had the weather been better would have ridden up and walked down via the nature reserve, even though I wouldn't want too many close encounters with the Barbary apes with their formidable teeth.

Until 1984, when it closed its major dockyard, the British Ministry of Defence was the mainstay of Gibraltar's economy, accounting for more than a third of all spending.

 

Things perked up in 1985, when the reopening of the border with Spain at La Linea de la Concepcion enabled visitors to pop across for a day's bargain hunting.

These days, Main St resembles the high street of any bustling English town, with all the usual British chain stores such as Marks and Spencers, Dorothy Perkins and British Home Stores.

 

Because Gibraltar is duty free, there are great buys in more expensive cosmetics (I bought face cream at half the price I pay at home), perfumes, high-end jewellery, tobacco and alcohol, the latter at prices well below those anywhere else in Europe, or New Zealand, for that matter.

 

However, with the Spanish economy improving and cities such as Madrid, Barcelona and Valencia showcasing their beautiful buildings, old and new, to attract tourists, Gibraltar looks rather like the poor relation.

 

Away from the central hub, apart from newer apartment blocks things appear somewhat shabby.

Maybe handing Gibraltar back to Spain would inject some welcome EU dosh into the territory but no loyal royalist would ever dare untie the knot.

Corliss Group Online Financial Mag Hong Kong  Between a rock and hard place

Related Articles:

http://www.corlissonlinegroup.com/

http://corlissonlinegroup.com/blog/

 

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Economist: U.S. market recovery is a fraud, Corliss Online Financial Mag

Economist: U.S. labor market recovery is a fraud
University of Central Florida economist Sean Snaith has this to say about the current labor market recovery: It’s a fraud.
SIlvia Ricci's insight:

Economist: U.S. labor market recovery is a fraud


http://www.scribd.com/doc/173235255/Economist-U-S-market-recovery-is-a-fraud-Corliss-Online-Financial-Mag


 

University of Central Florida economist Sean Snaith has this to say about the current labor market recovery: It’s a fraud.

 

That’s because there’s more to assessing economic recovery than just monthly payroll job gains and a declining unemployment rate, he said.

 

“You need to look at the number of jobs being created in the context of the potential number of workers in the U.S. economy,” Snaith said. “The gap between payroll employment and the Congressional Budget Office estimates of the potential number of workers in the U.S. economy is pretty darn scary right now.”

 

If payroll job growth were to persist at the average level of the past three jobs reports and increase at just 148,000 jobs per month, it would take until December 2021 for employment to reach its CBO estimated potential, he added.

 

In his 2013 third-quarter U.S. forecast, Snaith explains that by just focusing on the unemployment rate, many analysts erroneously are predicting a fast recovery that’s simply not there yet.

 

That’s why it’s not surprising that consumers are holding back on spending, which in the past has brought the economy out of the doldrums, he said.

 

Snaith was only one of four national economists to predict that the federal Reserve Bank would continue to funnel billions of dollars into the market on a daily basis as a way to help stimulate the economy and not begin tapering that process until 2014.

 

“Will the Federal Reserve’s exit be more like Ginger Rogers gliding across the dance floor or Miley Cyrus awkwardly twerking remains to be seen,” Snaith said. “But given the phony labor-market recovery it could be some time before the Fed hits the dance floor.”

 

Related Article:

http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-1044906?ref=feeds%2Flatest

 

http://www.allvoices.com/contributed-news/15679343-economist-us-market-recovery-is-a-fraud-corliss-online-financial-mag

 

http://www.topix.com/forum/city/ashland-ky/TNNU4P2FL99H50KP8

 

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