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Rescooped by steve batchelder from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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How The Activity Learning Theory Works

How The Activity Learning Theory Works | SteveB's Social Learning Scoop | Scoop.it
How The Activity Learning Theory Works 

Vygotsky’s earlier concept of mediation, which encompassed learning alongside others (Zone of Proximal Development) and through interaction with artifacts, was the basis for Engeström’s version of Activity Theory (known as Scandinavian Activity Theory). Engeström’s approach was to explain human thought processes not simply on the basis of the individual, but in the wider context of the individual’s interactions within the social world through artifacts, and specifically in situations where activities were being produced.

In Activity Theory people (actors) use external tools (e.g. hammer, computer, car) and internal tools (e.g. plans, cognitive maps) to achieve their goals. In the social world there are many artifacts, which are seen not only as objects, but also as things that are embedded within culture, with the result that every object has cultural and/or social significance.

Tools (which can limit or enable) can also be brought to bear on the mediation of social interaction, and they influence both the behavior of the actors (those who use the tools) and also the social structure within which the actors exist (the environment, tools, artifacts). For further reading, here is Engeström’s own overview of 3 Generations of Activity Theory development. The first figure shows Second Generation AT as it is usually presented in the literature.

Via Gust MEES
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Francisco Velasquez's curator insight, Today, 11:09 AM

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Giacomo Bono's curator insight, Today, 12:46 PM

Social interactions with close others, technology, and our motivation to master environments all work together to change us. An important process not represented in this otherwise cool model is close relationships with older peers and adults (i.e., community) who know kids and the learning task at hand well enough to use the ZPD to support their learning.

HC's curator insight, Today, 7:08 PM

An interesting article on the Activity Theory where "people (actors) use external tools (e.g. hammer, computer, car) and internal tools (e.g. plans, cognitive maps) to achieve their goals." This article explores how this theory can be applied in education, "...teachers should be aware that everything in the classroom has a cultural and social meaning. " 

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Combine these concepts into a multitouch, interactive “video wall” or Smart TV-related apps: Some incredible opportunities for collaborative learning!

From DSC: Check out some of the functionality in these solutions. Then imagine if these solutions were in the size of an entire wall in a classroom or in a corporate L&D facility. Whew! Some serious opportunities for collaboration would arise for remote learners –as well as those... http://elearningfeeds.com/combine-these-concepts-into-a-multitouch-interactive-video-wall-or-smart-tv-related-apps-some-incredible-opportunities-for-collaborative-learning/


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Rescooped by steve batchelder from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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Techniques for Unleashing Student Work from Learning Management Systems | Life Long LEARNing

Techniques for Unleashing Student Work from Learning Management Systems | Life Long LEARNing | SteveB's Social Learning Scoop | Scoop.it
In my mind, this is exactly what the future of lifelong learning looks like. We will be learning constantly throughout our careers as workers and citizens, and once young people graduate from formal institutions, much of that learning will be self-directed and unstructured. What I hope that students could take away from my Connected Course were the skill sets to participate in that kind of learning out on the open Web, and the belief that lifelong learning can be most powerful when we intentionally build networks of people to learn with us.

On the first day of my course, I tell students that they have three responsibilities: to advance their own learning, to advance the learning of their classmates and to advance the learning of their wider communities. If they are successful as students, they’ll benefit not only themselves, but their classmates and colleagues beyond.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Life-Long-Learning



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Gust MEES's curator insight, February 13, 10:14 AM
In my mind, this is exactly what the future of lifelong learning looks like. We will be learning constantly throughout our careers as workers and citizens, and once young people graduate from formal institutions, much of that learning will be self-directed and unstructured. What I hope that students could take away from my Connected Course were the skill sets to participate in that kind of learning out on the open Web, and the belief that lifelong learning can be most powerful when we intentionally build networks of people to learn with us.

On the first day of my course, I tell students that they have three responsibilities: to advance their own learning, to advance the learning of their classmates and to advance the learning of their wider communities. If they are successful as students, they’ll benefit not only themselves, but their classmates and colleagues beyond.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Life-Long-Learning


Tasia Thompson's curator insight, February 14, 12:32 PM

Since this is a goal for myself and my children---why wouldn't I have this g