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What is SEO? Content Tips For Graphic Designers - HOW Design & Scenttrail Note

What is SEO? Content Tips For Graphic Designers - HOW Design & Scenttrail Note | SteveB's Social Learning Scoop | Scoop.it

How strong is your content marketing strategy? What is SEO, anyway? Read 6 SEO tips and tricks to help you boost the visibility of your web content.

1. Strong Copy Trumps SEO.
2. Do Keyword Research.
3. Share Link Love (i.e. create great content).

Marty Note
Interesting to see how How Design explains SEO to graphic designers. I would take a slightly different tack. Let's reframe SEO in ways graphic designers can understand and adapt.

I create content daily and am learning SLOWLY how to make headlines sing and links flow in. As competition for links goes UP with the rising tide of content publishers are the right side of the bell curve where more than average links reside will learn a few tricks from graphic designers such as:

* ARRESTING Images.
* Demand hierarchy.
* Clear Calls To Action (CTAs).
* Headlines that GRAB and HOLD.

Content that doesn't get read doesn't help. The first rule of getting your content read is find an ARRESTING related image you won't get sued to use. Haiku Deck (http://www.haikudeck.com) is one of my favorite visual marketing tools. Need lawsuit free arresting images? Use Haiku Deck.

Demand Hierarchy is keeping demands on your visitors LOW. When I was a Director of Ecommerce we did extensive analysis of our 40+ homepage links and 5 mattered. Vicious 90%/10% rule in links. Key is to lower choice and eliminate the superfluous. 

CTAs don't have to be "buy now" anymore. We love asking a question with the link between the present page and the answer. Want To Be A Great Internet Marketer? Highlight and underline that sentence and it will get clicked because it is an IMPLIED CTA.

This doesn't mean we are above a good "Learn More", but too many "old style" CTAs can get boring and lose their punch.

Finally your HEADLINE or subheads matter. Headlines should set a hook. Subheads should organize the answer so readers can scan and skip sections. I try to live by the 7 word rule.

I read this rule about roadside billboards. Billboard creators limit their copy to 7 words because who can read more zipping buy at 60 mph. We all zip by at 100 mph on the web these days so short, punchy headlines that align with your arresting image and plant a hook work best.

We like KEYWORDS, Brands and questions in headlines too. Questions create curiosity. Keywords create scenttrail and brands create comfort and "like me" feelings of trust and security.



Via Martin (Marty) Smith
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Rescooped by steve batchelder from Curation, Social Business and Beyond
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Is Content Curation Stealing or a Shrewd B2B Marketing Practice?

Is Content Curation Stealing or a Shrewd B2B Marketing Practice? | SteveB's Social Learning Scoop | Scoop.it

This very timely article was written by Andrew Hunt, founder of Inbound Sales Network, for Business2Community.

 

It raises an issue between original Content Creators, Content Curators and people who repost these articles.

 

Commentary by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media and Beyond"

 

The reason I was moved to do this commentary is because I see a wonderful opportunity to come together as a community and help shape the future of curation. Content Curation is in its infancy and there’s a lot of misunderstanding about its potential. As I see it, it’s a brilliant B2B marketing strategy for anyone who is selling a product or service if done responsibly.

 

Content Curators are providing a very valuable service for the original author and their own audiences.

 

 

Here is what ethical, responsible curators are providing for content creators:

 

1. Syndicating content and introducing it to new audiences, which is excellent PR if it is being curated by a “trusted source”

 

2. A good headline grabs the attention of a reader and gets them into the piece quickly. A curator who can tailor the headline to grab their audience will inevitably send more traffic to the original article

 

3. A curator who is skilled at adding commentary and context to the original piece also broadens the audience of the original work

 

4. Curation is one of the building blocks of collective intelligence

 

5. If a curator fully accredits both author and article, authors might have a whole new area of exposure/distribution channel that they wouldn’t have had before

 

6. People get paid to market and open up new business for brands. Curators do this free of charge while building their own audience. Each party gains. It is a new and exciting form of symbiosis in business

 

 

I know that there are people out there who are just taking people’s work. I have spent time adding commentary only to find it has been published on Facebook and other sites without giving credit to me or the original author. They use it for their own gain but I think and hope this will become more the exception as Curation matures.

 

I like many of my colleagues are building our brands and want to be known for selecting only the best content that informs and educates our audience. We want authors to want us to curate for them and feel that we’re working in concert not on opposing teams. We want them to be happy that we're taking the time to find the essence in what they’re saying and take it to a whole new audience. It is a part of our job to bring authors to the attention of people who would not otherwise know of them.

 

 

This was a Q & A at the end of the original article in Business2Community:

 

(q) How is content curation different from stealing?

 

(a) Great question! Part of the genesis of Aggregage was my experience with “curators” who would take my content, put it on a page with no link or a link that had an anchor tag that said “link” or something similar. They would change the title and URL for my post on their site. The goal of that person was to get SEO value from my content.

They also allowed commenting on their sites. The reason I would write the post is for people to find me and my content and to engage with me in conversation.

These types of curators were definitely taking away from that. Aggregage takes a very different approach. Our goal is to be THE launching point out to all the great content getting created on particular topics. We specifically do not have pages that compete with the original source. We only show snippets.

We provide full links with the original title. We don’t have commenting on our site. Basically, we are doing everything we can to get readers to go to the original source and engage with the content. Many of the participating bloggers find that we become the second biggest referral source behind Google search.

 

 

My take is that we're still in the early stages of curation and while I understand resentment to curators who do not fully attribute their work. However, it is incorrect to assume that changing headlines and URLs automatically means that people are stealing your work strictly for their own gain. That's not how this works with people who are serious about curation.

 

The end goal  and my vision is for us to build community and broaden the audience of the content producers who we promote while building a niche audience of our own who trust that we are cutting through the noise to bring them the few articles they will hopefully find relevant. My community is the authors whose work I curate, the audience I bring their work to and other curators. I appreciate and nurture each relationship equally.

 

There are so many of you who could add brilliant insights, would love to hear your thoughts.

 

Read the original article: [http://bit.ly/u89c95]

 


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janlgordon's comment, November 28, 2011 4:30 PM
@bethkanter
Would love to meet you in NY! In the meantime, let's do connect next week and start the conversation, really looking forward to it, lots to talk about:-)
Liz Wilson's comment, November 29, 2011 3:17 AM
Jan, Thank you for this commentary - I completely agree with you. I would also emphasise that a curator must (in my opinion) take responsibility for ensuring what is curated is true/honest/accurate/fair, which involves thoroughly checking the source article's credibility.

Great piece - thanks again.
janlgordon's comment, November 29, 2011 1:08 PM
@Liz Wilson
Thanks for your comments. I absolutely agree with everything you said here.
Rescooped by steve batchelder from Content and Curation for Nonprofits
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The Most Popular Words in the Most Viral Headlines

The Most Popular Words in the Most Viral Headlines | SteveB's Social Learning Scoop | Scoop.it
A study of viral headlines and the top words and phrases that make up viral headlines for the most shareable sites on the web.

Via Beth Kanter
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Beth Kanter's curator insight, April 28, 2014 10:20 AM

After looking at the initial data, Ripenn found seven key commonalities. I’ve reworded them here into some helpful headline tips:

  1. Make the most of current events: Tie your headline to news and newsmakers
  2. Break some “rules” of headline writing, like length
  3. Seek to pique the reader’s curiosity
  4. Never underestimate the emotional factor of a headline
  5. Call the reader to action with direct action words
  6. Make bold claims
  7. Sound like a human, not a robot