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dreamland

dreamland | StephanieCGeog400 | Scoop.it
This is an awesome picture. This landscape is incredible; it makes me think of Sao Miguel where my family is from.
It is breath-taking.
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Youth unemployment in the Arab world

Youth unemployment in the Arab world | StephanieCGeog400 | Scoop.it
The Arab world has the highest rate of unemployment among youth. This is costing Arab countries a lot of money.
It is sad to hear that even though people graduated and have degrees, they cannot find any jobs due to the economi crisis. They say that with a degree, it will always bring you far. Well, at the moment, it isn't bringing the graduates anywhere.
Nice article; I could feel what the graduates were feeling.
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Giant outdoor escalator built in Colombian shantytown

This is awesome!! The video said that this escalator will help life. Although this is extraordinary to see, what happens when it rains?
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Why more Mexicans are staying home

After seeing this video, I am surprised that not many Mexicans are coming into the United States. I guess it does make sense however because the U.S border has become a lot more strict, making it impossible for Mexicans to come.
It was nice to see the smiles on the children's faces. These people want to do well for them and their families; they are hard workers.
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World Tattoo

World Tattoo | StephanieCGeog400 | Scoop.it
Awesome picture.
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South Asian floods take economic toll

Afsan Chowdhury says climate change comes on top of already rising sea levels and environmental degradation Thursday August 9th, 2007 Afsan Chowdhury has spe...
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Finding the flotsam: where is Japan's floating tsunami wreckage headed?

Finding the flotsam: where is Japan's floating tsunami wreckage headed? | StephanieCGeog400 | Scoop.it

This is awesome; I find it interesting that the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the University of Hawaii are monitoring when that mass will reach the U.S. West Coast and where it will go. It amazes me how even though this happened over a year ago, the debris is still in progress.

They said that the debris can break up and sink to the bottom of the ocean, so they will never be sure if that debris came from the tsunami or elsewhere; that’s the down part to it.

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Brian Nicoll's curator insight, December 12, 2012 1:47 AM

It will be very interesting to see if this floating pile of junk actually reaches the west coast of the United States.  It seems possible that it could, but some of the scientists and other experts believe that it could also break up and sink before it reaches us.  One of my questions going in was whehter or not the wreckage was radioactive?  Luckily it is not radioactive and that should not be a concern for anyone. 

Brett Sinica's curator insight, December 10, 2013 5:02 PM

This video showed time elasped which stopped in the summer of 2013, it is now December.  At the time of the video the mass was entering the eastern part of the Pacific Ocean so I'm curious to where it is now.  I can't find any current imagery of the vast ocean but it would be a neat, yet dangerous spectacle.  I could only imagine any of the harm it's causing on the sealife on its way across the pacific.  We can only hope that doesn't bring too many issues once it washes up on the west coast, if at all.

Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 6:09 PM

Hopefully none of the wreckage that reaches the US is radioactive.... But the projected travel of the debris shows how ocean currents create, almost, a "natural" globalization of natural disasters. 

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Unusual ways to avoid Jakarta's traffic

Unusual ways to avoid Jakarta's traffic | StephanieCGeog400 | Scoop.it

Living in Jakarta definitely would not work for me. I can't stand traffic for twenty minutes, and traffic in Jakarta can last an hour or more!! I can only imagine how aggravating it must be for the people in Jakarta.

I can understand that people would obviously think of other ways to beat the traffic, and if it means having to get money illegally, then that's what they'll do.  If the government does not do something to improve this, it can only get worse.

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 18, 8:53 PM

Jakarta is faced with overpopulation and traffic problems. The government passed a law, which requires a vehicle to have passengers aboard, in the hopes of speeding up the traffic entering the city. However, some drivers are paying people to take a ride with them into the city to avoid the fines. In most areas throughout the world, passengers would be paying the driver for a ride, but in this city, it is different. The government should find another solution to fix the traffic issues. 

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 2:49 PM

This video was interesting.  It shows that with increased urbanization come the problem of increased traffic congestion.  Government that are growing need to be aware of this and build their cities accordingly to have transportation that can accommodate all the people swelling the city.

Paige Therien's curator insight, May 2, 2:51 PM

Indonesia's capital city, Jakarta, is located on the country's most heavily populated island of Java.  The city has seen an intense population explosion, and with is came more and more vehicles.  The roads are overcrowded and there is not enough public transportation.  People in Jakarta have had to adapt to the social environment that has been created.  Jockeys charge drivers for giving them rides into the center of the  city (you need to have three of more people in your car to do so).  Even if they did not need to go into the city, it is a way to make many, albeit illegal.  Cities, like Jakarta, are places where infrastructure and public transportation is needed most heavily, but it is the most difficult and expensive place to do so.

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Lurking in the Deep

Lurking in the Deep | StephanieCGeog400 | Scoop.it
Although this is terrible for that one shark, I must say, this picture is awesome. To be able to catch this. This left me in shock. Whether this is the first published photograph of a wobbegong swallowing another shark or not, this is the first I've ever seen!
All the diverse wildlife in the ocean interest me. Every single species is awesome and reading this article was very interesting!!
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Cam E's curator insight, April 8, 1:18 PM

The Great Barrier Reef is one of the most biologically diverse regions in the world, and the ecosystem that exists there is extremely delicate, as well as extremely fantastic, as seen in this article.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 5:41 PM

When I first saw this image I thought that this white shark was swimming into a chest or something anything except for another shark. Then when opening the article it was apparent that the shark was being eaten by another shark. 

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 23, 5:57 PM

A wobbegong, also known as the carpet shark, engulfs a bamboo shark in the Great Barrier Reef. This was a surprising and rare photo for Divers in Australia. It is crazy how animals so close in relativity can instantly become predators, and possibly a meal, to each other!

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Slideshare: Middle east flags

I love how Israel is the odd flag in the Middle East!!  All of the other flags have similar colors to one another, and Israel is the odd ball.  It looks as if Israel was like, "Hey, look everyone, there's another color in the world that we don't know about."  Hahaha.  

It was good to learn about the colors in class and what it symbolized!!

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Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 29, 2013 4:11 PM

Many of these countries share similar backgrounds and cultures, as well as flags which is seen above.  The color patterns show red, black,  white, and green on almost every flag except Israel's which is blue and white.  It shows that most of the countries within the region are all linked somehow whether it be through language, identity, or other reasons, though there is still room for conflict and change as time passes.  After looking at flags from other countries such as Iraq and Iran, the graphics on them change, sometimes reflecting government changes.  It is sometimes difficult to remember and notice so many flags, yet some of these flags have changed within the last 2 to 3 decades to accompany the change of government.

Amy Marques's curator insight, April 24, 2:06 PM

This goes to show how a flag is supposed to represent the people who live in their country. And the flag of Israel really does stick out like a sore thumb. We have the crescent moon, the typical Arabic colors of green, red, black, and white, and the blue and white really doesn't have much to do with the history of the people who live in Israel, only the new Jewish community who live there, but not the Palestinians. 

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 29, 11:36 AM

Representation of middle eastern flags,

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Over 27 and unmarried? In China, you’re an old maid

Over 27 and unmarried? In China, you’re an old maid | StephanieCGeog400 | Scoop.it

 This article was funny to read; if a woman in China is over twenty-seven and she is single, then she is an old maid. That is amusing, but yet, tragic that they see it this way. As I was reading this article, I could sort of relate it to my aunt. My aunt is 32 and is not married; however, she has a fiancé. It is still the same thing though; I have a few family members who ask her all the time when is the wedding going to be and what’s taking so long. But when she was 27, she didn’t have anyone in particular, and the questions just kept coming and coming. I’ve always heard about China having the one-child policy and how that affects everything. But, females shouldn’t be pressured into marrying; that’s how I feel it is. They are centered on getting married and if they don’t by the time they’re a certain age, they are considered, “leftovers.” I find that tragic; like leave the females alone! In the article, there was a female and her mother kept bugging her about getting married. Well, you won’t find that from my parents!! My father would rather me not get married if he had it his way. My mother is less strict however; she wants me to finish school before thinking of marriage. I agree with that; if I don’t get married now, that’s fine. I certainly won’t go crazy if I’m over 30 and not married.  It just isn't fair for women.  Men are looked upon so differently and it amazes me how gender affects everything.

I could relate myself to a female in the article. She wanted true love; she didn’t care about money. Men always try and impress females with money and cars. That isn’t everything to some females and it certainly isn’t everything to me. If I thought like that, then my current relationship would be a fail. Anyhow, it’s good to know that there are some females out there who think like me. Overall, this article was interesting for me and I could relate to a couple of things that were in it!

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 9, 2013 1:22 PM

It is hard for Chinese women to attract men once they reach a certain age in Beijing it was reported in 2009 that there was 800,000 women 27 and unmarried and the number was rising. Many mothers of these women even argue with them or try to set them up with men they dont like. In the US women are getting married older and older and it is viewed as socially acceptable mainly because they are focusing on their carrers and making sure they are settled first. 

Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, October 21, 2013 1:05 PM

This article is interesting as it discusses one example of how gender roles and cultural norms differ from country to country.  Chinese women who are around 30 years old and single are referred to as "leftover girls".  Similar to a growing trend in the United States, Chinese women are focusing on their careers and their own goals and waiting to marry until they find the right person and have their own lives in order.  However, in the United States, this way of life for women is more socially acceptable whereas in China, it is not as acceptable for these "leftover girls".

Marissa Roy's curator insight, December 5, 2013 1:32 PM

It is interesting to see this as in American culture, marrying in your 20s is not a necessity anymore, it's almost unexpected. With so many men to choose from, these girls have time to find a man. The culture is going to shift as these ladies get married later in life.

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Life in Chechnya

Life in Chechnya | StephanieCGeog400 | Scoop.it

These pictures were interesing to look at.  The most innocent acts that I would think of would basically be a law in Chechnya.  This place is so strict; that is just how the culure is.  For example, if a Chechen girl was caught smoking, she would be arrested.  If that were like this in America, boy would there be a lot of angry females!!  Chechnya is becoming more and more Islamic and the government is doing all it can to enforce this.

Women in Chechnya have it rough (in my opinion).  Any rule that they break will lead to consequences.  I can't even imagine how i would feel to live in Chechnya.  I'm so used to having choices (not that I make bad choices), but I would like to have my own choice rather than to have such strict rules.  In my personal opinion, if you aren't able to do something, chances are, you would most likely rebel.  I'm not saying Chechen women will rebel, but maybe just a few would try to or something.  I can't say that I feel sorry for Chechen women because maybe they all enjoy their culture and it doesn't really bother them, but I wouldn't be suprised if some did rebel.  Overall, this is their culture and this is how they are expected to live.  I find this to be interesting!  I also enjoyed looking through all of the photos!!

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Derek Ethier's comment, October 18, 2012 1:28 AM
The way women in Chechnya live is in line with how many Muslim women around the world live. They must cover their bodies and follow proper gender codes. Unfortunately, these girls still have very little power as is the case in many Muslim countries. Overall, it is amazing how many different cultures and ethnicities held inside of Russia.
Marissa Roy's curator insight, November 18, 2013 12:07 PM

I find learning about the young women during the rapid redefiniition of their culture into a Muslim state is of great interest. It is also of interest that the society is meshing traditional Islam  with the Russian way of governing to create a reemerged society.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 18, 3:24 PM

These pictures show many examples to how life in Chechnya for women is very different for women in the United States. We can see that these woman take part in similar day to day activities, but in very different ways. This is why their lives overall are much different than ours.

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Venice sinking five times faster than thought?

Venice sinking five times faster than thought? | StephanieCGeog400 | Scoop.it

Venice, by virtue of its geographic situation will always be sinking as a course of nature.  A research team from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the UCSD has recently concluded that Venice is sinking 2 millimeters per year...not catastrophic on a single year basis, but threatens the long-term viability and sustainability of the location. 

 

This is very interesting and surprising. I never really knew that about Venice!! It's kind of scary to think about it as well. Well, if I wanted to see Venice, guess I should get my ticket fast. I feel sorry for them. I would like to picture how it would be if it happened to us and we were in that situation, yikes!! It is sinking because of natural causes, and there isn't anything that they can do about it. The major part of these natural causes are the plate tectonics. The Adriatic plate includes Venice, and it is causing Venice to drop in elevation. Also, floods are increasing in Venice making it difficult for people to even walk. I believe that Venice will just sink because as I said, it is because of natural causes, no matter what they try, they will just be competing in something that they already lost since the beginning.

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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, September 30, 2013 8:47 PM

The famous city in Italy is sinking, and quickly.  It seems that the transient opportunities of a transient town are like that of other areas exposed to natural inclemence- such as New Orleans, and earthquake zones.  Sooner or later, places that are exposed to disaster will become inhabitable, and possibly abandoned.  When I hear of this city sinking, it makes me think of the Titanic, and how people should likely jump ship out of this situation, before the whole city 'goes under.'  I also think of marshy areas that would not be well-suited for development and inhabitance, and it seems that there is a history in the town that united people to live there in spite of the abundance of water.  Some of my ancestors were from Italy, and I wouldn't want harm to come to their homeland, but it really makes me wonder why they chose such a place to live...  It seems likely to me that the mere fact that it was sinking was not really considered much back then;  they were not as realistically concerned about the longevity of the city in the long run, than they were about the 'now' and the time at hand.  This reflects many facets of humanity and the hedonistic lifestyles that accompany many humans.  Humans that live for today and forget about tomorrow are doomed to live a life of sorry.  Humans that live for tomorrow and not today are out of touch and fail to seize the day.  Humans that live for today but remember tomorrow are the masons that build stairways to new lands for their descendents, and along with that, myriad new possibilities for positive opportunities.  I think some of the wisdom of Italy was put into its architecture and structural design, so that we might remember- we are dying in this life, just as Venice sinks, but we should live life as best as we can, and pave the way for future generations.  Like so, the dumping of wastes into the ocean seems tiny at first, but accumulates over many generations and will leave many ocean species dead, and harm the overall functionality of the Earth as a whole.  Let Venice be a reminder.

Paige McClatchy's curator insight, October 6, 2013 9:27 PM

So not only is Mexico City sinking, but Venice is as well, and five times faster than we thought at that. If the heart of an urban, sprawling city becomes completely destroyed what changes will be made to the outlying areas? Will they break up into multiple, smaller districts each with a central area? Where will the rich who used to reside in the heart move to?

Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 8, 2013 3:36 PM

Day to day, even looking into next year the rate of 2 millimeters per year may not seem drastic.  To a city that has been around for hundreds of years, it's assumed the city plans to stay standing for hundreds more.  Considering the age of the city, say in a couple hundred more years, some buildings could begin to take in water.  It is also possible that certain parts of the city could be sinking faster than others.  There is a similar situation in Mexico City where it was built on a lake and each year that source diminishes due to the demand of water by its residents.  Certain parts of the city are sinking and some buildings are slanted due to the results.  These cities are beautiful  but reality shows that as time passes, it will probably only get worse.  Hopefully preventions can be taken to at least reduce the speed of sinking so that people after us can appreciate the architecture and atmosphere the city has provided all these years.

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Ramadan 2012 begins

Ramadan 2012 begins | StephanieCGeog400 | Scoop.it
The third picture with all of the Muslims offering prayers next to parked cars is amazing. When I saw this picture, I was shocked.
These were beautiful pictures.
I've always enjoyed other religions and liked learning what they were all about. It was always just words that O'd read however; so these pictures helped me visually see how Muslims are during Ramadan.
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Hurricane Sandy in Rhode Island - October 2012

A hurricane I will never forget. These pictures are just terrible; all of the damage that this hurricane has done, not only to Rhode Island, but other states as well.
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Obesity and Overweight for Professionals: Data and Statistics: Adult Obesity - DNPAO - CDC

Obesity and Overweight for Professionals: Data and Statistics: Adult Obesity - DNPAO - CDC | StephanieCGeog400 | Scoop.it
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Haiti slowly being rebuilt by locals, charities | ksl.com

Haiti slowly being rebuilt by locals, charities | ksl.com | StephanieCGeog400 | Scoop.it
Seeing this video was great. I am glad that people took action in helping rebuild Haiti. One of them who wanted to help was named Kathleen, who was born in Haiti. With creativeness and cooperation, Haiti will be slowly rebuilt.
All the Haitians are asking for is opportunities. If they are given an opportunity to have resources, they will do for themselves.
I am glad that a lot of Americans pitched in; if we all just work together, things will get better.
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Beijing worker risks his life to demolish part of a building

This is ridiculous; there is no worker safety. They are risking their lives to demolish part of this building. This is almost impossible to see. One false move, and the guy hanging on the crane would have been done for!! This just isn't worth the tiny paycheck, but that's what Beijing workers have to do. It just shows me that they are willing to risk their lives for little money and terrible living. I also have a question, what good will the helmet on the guy's head do??!! Like seriously??!!
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Somalia's Pirates Face Growing Backlash

Somalia's Pirates Face Growing Backlash | StephanieCGeog400 | Scoop.it

This is kind of scary to think about. The pirates really didn't have a choice but to have turned to piracy. This may be wrong, but that's not what they're worrying about; they are making money out of it! The government says that the pirates are an embarrassment. Somalia has been a poor country, but the pirates bring money to certain people, such as a hair-dresser who has worked for them.
The pirates will end their career if certain things are met. They want the government to form a coast guard and to create jobs. They want to end the toxic wastes. They aren’t asking for much; they will be happy with anything else, but the situation that they are in!

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Elizabeth Allen's comment, November 7, 2012 10:57 AM
The concept of piracy is a scary one. Their illegal ways cause corruption throughout their society. However, it seems as if they do not have much choice. Yes, it is morally wrong, but look at the money they are making. The prirates are willing to cease illegal activity if their demands are met. Their demands are not out of the ordinary-- they want their oceans protected from toxic waste, job creations, and a fair government. Somalia has a long road ahead of them to acheive any sort of unity.
James Good's comment, April 19, 2013 8:14 PM
Piracy is continuing to grow in Somalia because the country has adopted the practice as a part of their culture. Although many of the Somalian people oppose piracy, there are a large number of people who are supporting it and benefiting from it. For many of these people, pirating money is the only opportunity they have to make money. Many of them seek alternatives and wish to end their criminal practices but there is nothing else they can do. Unfortunately, pirates in Somalia have labelled their country with a negative stereotype. Whenever people think of Somalia, they will think of the Somalian pirates and the trouble that they have caused for foreign ships.
Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 28, 2013 11:41 PM

Much like the piracy in the Caribbean in the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries it is done in order to gain wealth and by the looks of it, fame.  They are called Pirate Kings in the video by the New York Times.  Again much like the pirate kings of the Caribbean.  Here however they are willing to give it up in order to better their country with the help of the internation community, the pirates of the Caribbean didn't have a country and they liked it that way.  However, it was tried in the early 1990's to help allievate the food and humanitarian suffering.  However the warlords of the time, especailly Aideed, saw their power, as well as their money, disappearing, so they fought this relief effort and kept Somalia in the dangerous situation it is in today.  So you have to ask the question: Can you take the pirates seriously that they want to change??  Past history says no.

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Viewfinder: Gaza's Tunnels

This video was interesting to see. It showed me that these people will do anything to earn a living. It's amusing that these people can outsmart the government with the tunnels that they build. Watching the process of how they build the tunnels was interesting. It is sad however to see that in order for them to make a living, they have to risk their lives in these tunnels. They have to build these tunnels in order to smuggle certain goods within the walls of Gaza. It goes to show me what people will do in places in order to survive.
Having 1,000 tunnels built, Israel having their government get rid of them whenever found would be nothing.
This video makes us understand how the goods are being transferred and how it has become a problem, and that these people are doing such dangerous tasks in order to survive.

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Brian Nicoll's curator insight, December 12, 2012 12:42 AM

I think that these tunnels show the willpower of the Palestinians.  They are risking their lives on a daily basis in order to smuggle goods that Palestine could not obtain through normal means.  I think this video really shows the dangers that present themselves in these tunnels.  Israel has the right to monitor these tunnels and can very easily have them destroyed if they feel as though guns are being moved through them.  The people who move through these tunnels every day are quite brave.

Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 22, 2013 12:09 AM

Amazing to see what people will do to survive.  They are doing this out of necessity.  Many goods they are smuggling are what I believe should be allowed in through normal means, food, water, medicine and anything needed for basic human needs.  I understand the blockade in stopping weapons and items of that nature, but stopping basic foodstuffs is just plain wrong.  The people are living and surviving by these tunnels and built an economy on them.  One thing that was really interesting was at the end when the man seemed he wanted the blockcade to go on or else it would close his tunnel and he would have to get "a real job."  The effects of this blockcade are on both ends of the spectrum, people want it to end so things can return to normal and others want it to go on to continue to make money.

Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 29, 2013 4:20 PM

What some media has led the "western world" to perceive is that many of the people living here would be trying to smuggle illegal goods such as bombs, drugs, etc.  Sure that may be true in some cases, but many times there are respectable citizens which simply need food or necessary items to sustain their lives.  Because of the tight security measures regarding people and goods, the people of Gaza simply try to find a way around the authorities, and the best current option is by tunnels.  Situations like this show that if people really need certain things, with some help and determination, they can achieve that goal.  In the end, hopefully it is for good more often than bad.

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Planting Rice

Watching this video just makes me think about my back.  I have back problems and I'm only in my twenties!  This video goes to show us how important rice is in Thailand; it is the staple crop.  They have to do what they have to do; if it means having to break their backs, then so be it.

I can't even sweep the steps in my house for ten minutes because my back begins to hurt like crazy, so I give credit to these women for the work they do!!

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Donald Dane's comment, December 10, 2013 10:20 AM
this video of Thailand shows just how different life styles are throughout the world. Americans for instance wouldn't be found dead doing this type of labor work. that goes to show just how shallow americans are and how incredible these people are for doing labor of this nature. planting rice is not only a life style they pick to do it is a life style they must do. with rice being Thailand's prime export and an ideal location for rice paddys this "job" isn't actually a job its a must do. these women spend hundreds of hours a week doing this.
Brett Sinica's curator insight, December 10, 2013 4:11 PM

When you look at Thailand from satellite imagery, it looks as though much of the country has a tannish color which you would think is dry and has less vegetation compared to neighboring countries.  The country actual has quite a bit of rainfall, and the suspect for all the dry-looking areas is farming fields for things such as rice.  This is serious manual labor with constant bending and speedy methods.  Though in a culture, and broader surrounding region that uses rice so frequently in their meals, having these type of farms is necessary to everyday life.

Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:03 PM

Just watching them work makes my back hurt. I feel terribel for them, but it is their job. I wonder if there are any machines or tools that they can use to get their job done more uickly and easier. Agriculture started off just like this. It was only people planting and doing all the work, but now in there are machines used for this new generation of agriculture. It's just sad that many countries still can't afford all these tools or machines. So unfortunately, people do have to physically hurt themselves or go through some sort of pain just to get things done. But this video makes me appreicate more where my food is coming from, because the foods that I buy does come from all over the world.

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How did Pakistan get it's name?

How did Pakistan get it's name? | StephanieCGeog400 | Scoop.it

When I learned this in class, it was amusing.  I just had to rescoop this!  Before 1947, the country that is Pakistan once was a British colony!  How the name Pakistan came about was from a group of college students.  They came up with the name Pakistan because they took the first letters of their homelands and put it together.  But get this, the last homeland was Balochistan.  Obviously, this homeland does not begin with the letter "N."  So, what they did was take the last letter from Balochistan, which is the letter "N."  That was how they came up with the name, "Pakistan."  Pakistan means the land of the Paks.  This was interesting to learn how the name came about and what it means!!

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 15, 2013 9:13 PM

In 1947 the United Kingdom granted independence to this region and named it Pakistan. The name was created by a group of students at Cambrige University and used the names of their homelands. Punjab, Afghania  Kashmir, Iran ,Sindh, Tukharistan, Afghanistan, Pakistan is an acronym! 

Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, November 14, 2013 9:06 AM

It is interesting to learn how particular countries got their names.  Pakistan was a British colony until 1947 and it was given the name Pakistan as an acronym for the 8 homelands in the country.  Pakistan is so ethnically divided that religion is really important for the country to stay together.

Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 19, 2013 2:27 PM

When you take in the way that the British Empire controlled many colonies and tried to spread their culture to such diverse regions, it is no suprise that Pakistan was named essentially by a game of Scrabble.  I suppose the naming is somewhat creative and certainly unique compared to how other countries get their names, yet just picturing a group of colleagues naming a country is strange.  Though the U.K. did grant them independance, how independant were they really if they weren't even given the right to name their own land.

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India's Blackout: In The Dark About Being In The Dark : NPR

India's Blackout: In The Dark About Being In The Dark : NPR | StephanieCGeog400 | Scoop.it

This article was very interesting! It is nice to learn things about other countries. For example, if we have a hurricane here in the U.S., and people start talking about power outages, everyone, if not everyone, then most people begin to panic and buy supplies as if it will be extremely chaotic. I never go that crazy; sure I’ll worry, but it won’t be chaotic for me. Whatever happens, happens; that’s how I live. These people in India think the same. They were born and raised with inconvenience. They don’t find that power outages are a crisis, they just find that it is annoying. Sometimes I wish people thought more like the people in India because you just need to let things happen; things will fall into place whether you panic or not; so why panic? That’s how I look at it. Anyhow, awesome article, I enjoyed reading it!!

Stephanie Cordeiro

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Religious Pilgrimage: the Hajj

Religious Pilgrimage: the Hajj | StephanieCGeog400 | Scoop.it

I loved reading this article. I enjoyed reading the captions about their cultural customs.  Even though I am not Muslim, I like to learn about others and how they live their lives. I liked looking through all of these photos.

I’ve always known that Muslims had to attend the hajj because it is one of the pillars for Islamic faith. It was always a question of mine about what would happen if any could not attend the hajj due to certain reasons. My question was answered in class; at least one family member could go attend the hajj, and when they would arrive back home, they would tell their families the stories about what happened and how it was. They would explain everything in depth so that the family members could sense and feel it as if they too went to the hajj.

What I found to be a downer is that if you aren’t Muslim, you cannot go. The hajj is only open to those who are Muslim. This isn’t the faith I practice, but it would have been a cool experience if I were ever able to go, just to see how it all went. Another downer is that I’m claustrophobic; I’d never be able to go there anyways even if I were able to go. So it’s all just ironic for me. Anyhow, I love hearing things about this faith. Nice photos!!

Stephanie Cordeiro


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Elizabeth Allen's comment, December 6, 2012 11:21 PM
The photos show what an immense congregation this event really is. If a picture is worth a thoudsand words, than this collection is a jackpot. The colors are captivating, green costumes of participants in the military parade, the hands holding the beads for sale. In the article from bbc.co.uk it is interesting to learn that such a religious event is an opportunity for economic gains. From merchants selling beads and rugs to visitors all the way to hotels capitalizing on the religious pilgrimage. It is amazing to know that every Muslim should make this trip as long as he/she is healthy and can afford to.
Crissy Borton's curator insight, December 11, 2012 8:55 PM

These photo’s are amazing! Number 12 with the crowd of people and the ambulance in the middle shows the massive amount of people. Their heads look like dots in a sea of white. These pictures show what words just cannot describe. 

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How They Found National Geographic's "Afghan Girl"

How They Found National Geographic's "Afghan Girl" | StephanieCGeog400 | Scoop.it

I am amazed that Sharbat Gula did not know that a lot of people have seen her picture before, which is a different story itself, but anyhow.  She was such an important icon and it is wonderful that Steve McCurry had finally found her.

I never knew about Sharbat.  I was so amazed by seeing her picture at the refugee camp in Pakistan, and her current picture, that I had to just engage my brother in the topic.  Sharbat was a refugee and she did not deserve to live the life that she did; but that is how life just is for some people.  Life isn't easy for everyone.

What really intrigues me is the fact that the current picture of her, it is twenty years after her picture at the refugee camp.  When I was asked how old she was in the second picture, I knew it was a trick question, but when I found out that it was just twenty years after her first picture, I was shocked.  This was such an interesting article to read!!!

Stephanie Cordeiro

 


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Brian Nicoll's curator insight, December 12, 2012 12:28 AM

While the picture may be famous, she still represents depressing life that the women of her generation live.  I found it interesting that she had no idea that her photo was so iconic.  To have a photo taken of you that was used in for a variety of different things, all while not knowing about it is quite shocking.  As famous as the photo is however, it should not cloud the symbolism that the photo stands for. 

Paige McClatchy's curator insight, October 20, 2013 10:39 PM

I'm so glad that National Geographic found such an exotic specimen in the wild and that the US government graciously put its technology to use to catalog her..... seriously the Western fascination with the image of this Afghan woman, 1 of insanely many, is something I don't get. I think it makes us all feel "cultured" and "informed" when we can sit in the comfort of a dentist or doctor's waiting room and breeze through a Nat Geo cover to cover. A cheap thrill.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 10:38 AM

Her face was a publicity stunt. Her story is sad and is brutal. She was in a refugee camp but her story is only one of many. She didn't know she was the face of National Geographic and people have the image of her in their minds when they think of Aghani women.