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dreamland

dreamland | StephanieCGeog400 | Scoop.it
This is an awesome picture. This landscape is incredible; it makes me think of Sao Miguel where my family is from.
It is breath-taking.
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Youth unemployment in the Arab world

Youth unemployment in the Arab world | StephanieCGeog400 | Scoop.it
The Arab world has the highest rate of unemployment among youth. This is costing Arab countries a lot of money.
It is sad to hear that even though people graduated and have degrees, they cannot find any jobs due to the economi crisis. They say that with a degree, it will always bring you far. Well, at the moment, it isn't bringing the graduates anywhere.
Nice article; I could feel what the graduates were feeling.
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Giant outdoor escalator built in Colombian shantytown

This is awesome!! The video said that this escalator will help life. Although this is extraordinary to see, what happens when it rains?
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Why more Mexicans are staying home

After seeing this video, I am surprised that not many Mexicans are coming into the United States. I guess it does make sense however because the U.S border has become a lot more strict, making it impossible for Mexicans to come.
It was nice to see the smiles on the children's faces. These people want to do well for them and their families; they are hard workers.
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South Asian floods take economic toll

Afsan Chowdhury says climate change comes on top of already rising sea levels and environmental degradation Thursday August 9th, 2007 Afsan Chowdhury has spe...
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Finding the flotsam: where is Japan's floating tsunami wreckage headed?

Finding the flotsam: where is Japan's floating tsunami wreckage headed? | StephanieCGeog400 | Scoop.it

This is awesome; I find it interesting that the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the University of Hawaii are monitoring when that mass will reach the U.S. West Coast and where it will go. It amazes me how even though this happened over a year ago, the debris is still in progress.

They said that the debris can break up and sink to the bottom of the ocean, so they will never be sure if that debris came from the tsunami or elsewhere; that’s the down part to it.

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Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 6:09 PM

Hopefully none of the wreckage that reaches the US is radioactive.... But the projected travel of the debris shows how ocean currents create, almost, a "natural" globalization of natural disasters. 

Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, September 1, 2014 10:43 AM

Although it's important to know where all of this trash is headed, this just makes me think of how we might prevent this. We can't prevent these catastrophic natural disasters, but how might we lessen it's effects on our cities and settlements? Furthermore, how might we lessen our impact on ecosystems during these times of catastrophe? 

It's only called a catastrophe when it hits human populations for a reason, it's not just devastating to us. Remnants of our lifestyle are carried far and wide, able to cause harm on many other species. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 4:37 PM

An example of how even without considering globalization the world is interconnected. The debris from the 2011 tsunami was never disposed of effectively and the United States may be effected more than they ever expected. If this pile of debris reaches US shores it will make many Americans consider how a tsunami across the globe will eventually hurt them at home. 

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Unusual ways to avoid Jakarta's traffic

Unusual ways to avoid Jakarta's traffic | StephanieCGeog400 | Scoop.it

Living in Jakarta definitely would not work for me. I can't stand traffic for twenty minutes, and traffic in Jakarta can last an hour or more!! I can only imagine how aggravating it must be for the people in Jakarta.

I can understand that people would obviously think of other ways to beat the traffic, and if it means having to get money illegally, then that's what they'll do.  If the government does not do something to improve this, it can only get worse.

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 2:35 PM

The amount of traffic in Jakarta is staggering and the traffic itself has built up a business of making commuting to work easier. What is troubling is that the government hasn't made enough of an effort to fix the problem of traffic in its largest and most economically viable city. If Jakarta wants to keep growing the government has to step in and find a way to make getting to work realistic for Indonesians.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 9:38 PM

The traffic in Jakarta is insane, to be in a constant standstill on your way to work is unreal. The reporter in the video says that if the city of Jakarta continues on its current path, it could be "in a state of Paralysis" which for an entire city is not good. The traffic has, for some, become a way to make money, illegally but money nonetheless.

Kendra King's curator insight, April 13, 2015 9:01 PM

Humans instinctively look to profit when the situation arises, this is one of those situations. The government implemented regulations that barely seem to manage the traffic jams, i.e. having 3 people per car. Since people do have to work and may not always be able to meet the requirements, others have started making a living as a “jockey,” an individual who offers to ride in a car so the 3 people limit is met. Doing this is considered illegal. Yet, there aren’t good enough jobs for people to work (otherwise they won’t be a jockey) and those who do work can’t seem to always follow the rule without it harming there work life.  Plus, more police now turn their attention towards these people thereby deterring them away from their other duties. I realize that the state probably never intended these consequences to happen, but now that it is I really wonder just how useful this law really is. One thing is certain though, without better planning or economic innovation by the government, the jams will continue to happen.

 

I find it odd that the people keep staying despite the major traffic problem. As one interviewee mentioned. I guess as long as you can find ways to stay productive and still receive enough compensation, the time spend in traffic isn't enough of a hassle for them. As someone who has enough economic opportunity with far less wait time in traffic though, I would find this situation unbearable. Clearly, this isn't that case though. So, I am not sure of the immediate solution. As we learned in class, the government tried transmigration. This just lead to more problems. It was then suggested that the type of opportunity. If that is the case though, what should the government do now? Waiting for a more natural economic opportunity to get the people out of Jakarta won't happen quick enough to curb the increasing population growth. Therefore the strain on the infrastructure will continue because the population's carrying capacity is exceeded. Whatever the answers, I think this would be a great case study for urban planning and the impact raising car dependency has on a society as this driving nightmare shows just how important planning is with more cars. 

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Lurking in the Deep

Lurking in the Deep | StephanieCGeog400 | Scoop.it
Although this is terrible for that one shark, I must say, this picture is awesome. To be able to catch this. This left me in shock. Whether this is the first published photograph of a wobbegong swallowing another shark or not, this is the first I've ever seen!
All the diverse wildlife in the ocean interest me. Every single species is awesome and reading this article was very interesting!!
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Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, September 1, 2014 10:38 AM

This article reminds me of another video i've seen recently of a grouper fish swallowing a 4-foot black tip shark whole. A fisherman caught that on camera while trying to reel in the shark. Time and time again I'm reminded that not everything in nature is as it seems and that the unexpected should be expected. 

This makes me want to buy some scuba gear and take some diving classes, I ought to conquer my fear of sharks by safely observing them with a research team! 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 4:36 PM

Amazing photos, there are so many different kinds of life that exists in the Ocean. As the Great Barrier Reef falls victim to climate change and pollution, the number of species at risk is almost calculable. 

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 16, 2014 1:26 PM

Australia's marine life is amazing, being able to hide by blending in to their environment is a testament to the waters that Australia has. The diverse wildlife of Australia waters is shown to be an adaptive bunch and begs the question: How many more animals are out there that we do not know of?

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Slideshare: Middle east flags

I love how Israel is the odd flag in the Middle East!!  All of the other flags have similar colors to one another, and Israel is the odd ball.  It looks as if Israel was like, "Hey, look everyone, there's another color in the world that we don't know about."  Hahaha.  

It was good to learn about the colors in class and what it symbolized!!

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Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 29, 2013 4:11 PM

Many of these countries share similar backgrounds and cultures, as well as flags which is seen above.  The color patterns show red, black,  white, and green on almost every flag except Israel's which is blue and white.  It shows that most of the countries within the region are all linked somehow whether it be through language, identity, or other reasons, though there is still room for conflict and change as time passes.  After looking at flags from other countries such as Iraq and Iran, the graphics on them change, sometimes reflecting government changes.  It is sometimes difficult to remember and notice so many flags, yet some of these flags have changed within the last 2 to 3 decades to accompany the change of government.

Amy Marques's curator insight, April 24, 2014 2:06 PM

This goes to show how a flag is supposed to represent the people who live in their country. And the flag of Israel really does stick out like a sore thumb. We have the crescent moon, the typical Arabic colors of green, red, black, and white, and the blue and white really doesn't have much to do with the history of the people who live in Israel, only the new Jewish community who live there, but not the Palestinians. 

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 29, 2014 11:36 AM

Representation of middle eastern flags,

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Over 27 and unmarried? In China, you’re an old maid

Over 27 and unmarried? In China, you’re an old maid | StephanieCGeog400 | Scoop.it

 This article was funny to read; if a woman in China is over twenty-seven and she is single, then she is an old maid. That is amusing, but yet, tragic that they see it this way. As I was reading this article, I could sort of relate it to my aunt. My aunt is 32 and is not married; however, she has a fiancé. It is still the same thing though; I have a few family members who ask her all the time when is the wedding going to be and what’s taking so long. But when she was 27, she didn’t have anyone in particular, and the questions just kept coming and coming. I’ve always heard about China having the one-child policy and how that affects everything. But, females shouldn’t be pressured into marrying; that’s how I feel it is. They are centered on getting married and if they don’t by the time they’re a certain age, they are considered, “leftovers.” I find that tragic; like leave the females alone! In the article, there was a female and her mother kept bugging her about getting married. Well, you won’t find that from my parents!! My father would rather me not get married if he had it his way. My mother is less strict however; she wants me to finish school before thinking of marriage. I agree with that; if I don’t get married now, that’s fine. I certainly won’t go crazy if I’m over 30 and not married.  It just isn't fair for women.  Men are looked upon so differently and it amazes me how gender affects everything.

I could relate myself to a female in the article. She wanted true love; she didn’t care about money. Men always try and impress females with money and cars. That isn’t everything to some females and it certainly isn’t everything to me. If I thought like that, then my current relationship would be a fail. Anyhow, it’s good to know that there are some females out there who think like me. Overall, this article was interesting for me and I could relate to a couple of things that were in it!

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Marissa Roy's curator insight, December 5, 2013 1:32 PM

It is interesting to see this as in American culture, marrying in your 20s is not a necessity anymore, it's almost unexpected. With so many men to choose from, these girls have time to find a man. The culture is going to shift as these ladies get married later in life.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 14, 2014 9:13 PM

Being 27 years old and unmarried in China considers you to be an old maid? I had to do a double take when I saw this. In the United States, 27 years old is around the average age a couple decides to get married. In China, Valentine's day is a really well liked holiday. Therefore, you would think that there would be excessive amounts of marriages, especially around this time. However, we know about the one child policy put into place at China. I can imagine that this might play a role because of the gender imbalances. As horrible as this sounds, in China, they call the women who are thirty and single "leftovers". During the season of the Chinese New Year and Valentine's Day, the "leftovers" just get questioned about their relationship status or go to matchmaking parties. However, the "leftovers" are said to have three good things; good career, good education and good looks. This is interesting because if they had all these good qualities, why would they still be single at 30 years old? As the article continues, we talk about true love and believe it or not, some "leftovers" still believe in true love and that they may experience that one day.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, December 15, 2014 4:14 PM

The fact that success relatively young women are seen as leftovers in China is a completely foreign idea to me.  n the United States we are seeing that more and more women are marrying later in life after they have received an education, higher education and have been established in a career.  Emily Liang is an extremely successful women who should be proud of her accomplishments, yet has to declare herself as "divorced" in order for men to think something isn't "wrong" with her.  It is extremely obvious that the role and view of women in China is significantly distorted. 

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Life in Chechnya

Life in Chechnya | StephanieCGeog400 | Scoop.it

These pictures were interesing to look at.  The most innocent acts that I would think of would basically be a law in Chechnya.  This place is so strict; that is just how the culure is.  For example, if a Chechen girl was caught smoking, she would be arrested.  If that were like this in America, boy would there be a lot of angry females!!  Chechnya is becoming more and more Islamic and the government is doing all it can to enforce this.

Women in Chechnya have it rough (in my opinion).  Any rule that they break will lead to consequences.  I can't even imagine how i would feel to live in Chechnya.  I'm so used to having choices (not that I make bad choices), but I would like to have my own choice rather than to have such strict rules.  In my personal opinion, if you aren't able to do something, chances are, you would most likely rebel.  I'm not saying Chechen women will rebel, but maybe just a few would try to or something.  I can't say that I feel sorry for Chechen women because maybe they all enjoy their culture and it doesn't really bother them, but I wouldn't be suprised if some did rebel.  Overall, this is their culture and this is how they are expected to live.  I find this to be interesting!  I also enjoyed looking through all of the photos!!

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 18, 2014 3:24 PM

These pictures show many examples to how life in Chechnya for women is very different for women in the United States. We can see that these woman take part in similar day to day activities, but in very different ways. This is why their lives overall are much different than ours.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 2014 12:28 PM

These photos show the culture of Chechnya. I found them very effective at mixing the environmental and cultural aspects of the area in these pictures. The one where two young people are on a date in a barren snow covered park sitting on opposites sides of the bench because close physical contact is forbidden before marriage. Although the school gym shows how women have to be dressed modestly even when they are exercising. 

Rachel Phillips's curator insight, May 10, 2015 7:33 PM

A picture says a thousand words.  I saw and learned more through these photos than I could of in any article, because you can really see what it's like there.  Authors and journalists can write and write about the facts and the people and the places, but they'll never really be able to show you, not the way pictures like these can.  The pictures of all these people show you what it's like to be there, how they live, what they do, their culture, beliefs, and ways of life. It's one thing to read about how strict rules for women are, but it's another to see those rules in action, like in gym class, and on dates.  We hear these ideas about countries who are strict with women, but can't really see what it would be like because we don't have that in the U.S., but these pictures make you feel it, not just think it.

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Venice sinking five times faster than thought?

Venice sinking five times faster than thought? | StephanieCGeog400 | Scoop.it

Venice, by virtue of its geographic situation will always be sinking as a course of nature.  A research team from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the UCSD has recently concluded that Venice is sinking 2 millimeters per year...not catastrophic on a single year basis, but threatens the long-term viability and sustainability of the location. 

 

This is very interesting and surprising. I never really knew that about Venice!! It's kind of scary to think about it as well. Well, if I wanted to see Venice, guess I should get my ticket fast. I feel sorry for them. I would like to picture how it would be if it happened to us and we were in that situation, yikes!! It is sinking because of natural causes, and there isn't anything that they can do about it. The major part of these natural causes are the plate tectonics. The Adriatic plate includes Venice, and it is causing Venice to drop in elevation. Also, floods are increasing in Venice making it difficult for people to even walk. I believe that Venice will just sink because as I said, it is because of natural causes, no matter what they try, they will just be competing in something that they already lost since the beginning.

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Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 8, 2013 3:36 PM

Day to day, even looking into next year the rate of 2 millimeters per year may not seem drastic.  To a city that has been around for hundreds of years, it's assumed the city plans to stay standing for hundreds more.  Considering the age of the city, say in a couple hundred more years, some buildings could begin to take in water.  It is also possible that certain parts of the city could be sinking faster than others.  There is a similar situation in Mexico City where it was built on a lake and each year that source diminishes due to the demand of water by its residents.  Certain parts of the city are sinking and some buildings are slanted due to the results.  These cities are beautiful  but reality shows that as time passes, it will probably only get worse.  Hopefully preventions can be taken to at least reduce the speed of sinking so that people after us can appreciate the architecture and atmosphere the city has provided all these years.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 2014 12:11 PM

Venice is a city that capitalized on its geography and developed canals so the city could grow despite being so close to sea level. Now that sea levels are rising, Venice is in trouble because its survival is dependent on the water levels, as they become out of control Venice will not be able to withstand the change. There are similar circumstances like in the Maldives where global warming and rising sea levels will put entire countries under water.

Kendra King's curator insight, February 15, 2015 6:58 PM

As you mentioned in class, we are living on constantly moving land features. In the case of Venice, the water is moving in on the city so it is actually sinking and has been for quite some time. What is new to the equation is that it might be sinking “five times more than” originally “calculated or “7.8 inches every hundred years.” I say might be because there are others who quibble about this new find, saying it is inaccurate. Also, there is a damn project in the works to try and combat the sinking. While I am happy that the city is working on slowing the process, I am curious to know what their solution is going to be when the city finally does go under. As I was reading this all I could think of was saving all the rich art and history that this Italian city is famous for. In some ways it is great that the city knows ahead of time that it is sinking because they have time to plan a way to save the important aspects of the city. On another hand though, the city is so below sea level that a natural disaster could cause far more damage than anyone could have foreseen. I just hope that doesn’t happen anytime soon because Venice is definitely on my bucket list.  

 

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Ramadan 2012 begins

Ramadan 2012 begins | StephanieCGeog400 | Scoop.it
The third picture with all of the Muslims offering prayers next to parked cars is amazing. When I saw this picture, I was shocked.
These were beautiful pictures.
I've always enjoyed other religions and liked learning what they were all about. It was always just words that O'd read however; so these pictures helped me visually see how Muslims are during Ramadan.
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Hurricane Sandy in Rhode Island - October 2012

A hurricane I will never forget. These pictures are just terrible; all of the damage that this hurricane has done, not only to Rhode Island, but other states as well.
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Obesity and Overweight for Professionals: Data and Statistics: Adult Obesity - DNPAO - CDC

Obesity and Overweight for Professionals: Data and Statistics: Adult Obesity - DNPAO - CDC | StephanieCGeog400 | Scoop.it
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Haiti slowly being rebuilt by locals, charities | ksl.com

Haiti slowly being rebuilt by locals, charities | ksl.com | StephanieCGeog400 | Scoop.it
Seeing this video was great. I am glad that people took action in helping rebuild Haiti. One of them who wanted to help was named Kathleen, who was born in Haiti. With creativeness and cooperation, Haiti will be slowly rebuilt.
All the Haitians are asking for is opportunities. If they are given an opportunity to have resources, they will do for themselves.
I am glad that a lot of Americans pitched in; if we all just work together, things will get better.
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Beijing worker risks his life to demolish part of a building

This is ridiculous; there is no worker safety. They are risking their lives to demolish part of this building. This is almost impossible to see. One false move, and the guy hanging on the crane would have been done for!! This just isn't worth the tiny paycheck, but that's what Beijing workers have to do. It just shows me that they are willing to risk their lives for little money and terrible living. I also have a question, what good will the helmet on the guy's head do??!! Like seriously??!!
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Somalia's Pirates Face Growing Backlash

Somalia's Pirates Face Growing Backlash | StephanieCGeog400 | Scoop.it

This is kind of scary to think about. The pirates really didn't have a choice but to have turned to piracy. This may be wrong, but that's not what they're worrying about; they are making money out of it! The government says that the pirates are an embarrassment. Somalia has been a poor country, but the pirates bring money to certain people, such as a hair-dresser who has worked for them.
The pirates will end their career if certain things are met. They want the government to form a coast guard and to create jobs. They want to end the toxic wastes. They aren’t asking for much; they will be happy with anything else, but the situation that they are in!

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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 22, 2014 4:25 PM

Somalia's pirates are notorious worldwide, and while the pirates may be committing horrible crimes, it is important to understand why these people have turned to illegal means to survive. The economic state of Somalia is rather grim. Considered a textbook "failed state", men for the most part have to choose between working as a fishermen or turning to piracy. Since fishermen barely scrape a living from the waters, Somalian men turn to piracy. With no other economic opportunities, it is often seen as the only choice. Many Somali pirates openly admit that if they had other options, they would absolutely change occupations. 

John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:17 PM

The media oftentimes demonizes specific groups of people. So I was presently surpassed that the NYT’s investigated the human aspect of desperation. Many of these Somalians are hopeless and the economic burden on their shoulders drives them to act unethical. When you first priority is survival, courteousness and moral laws often don’t apply. Nevertheless, it was cool to hear about these human stories.

Joshua Mason's curator insight, March 31, 2015 7:37 PM

Just like the pirates of the late 17th and early 18th centuries, these folks bring all the vices of the originals except perhaps without much of the romanticism that comes with the elders. Though perhaps in two hundred years someone will make a movie titled Pirates of the Somalia featuring Johnny Depp's great-great-great grandson. 

 

It's understandable why these people want to get out of the business. Despite the sex and wealth they've gotten, it's not exactly stable employment. Nor is it as safe as sitting at a desk or being a plumber. But when your society simply doesn't support these industries, then the people are left to resort to more drastic measures.

 

It's also interesting to see the quazi-government stepping in to try and combat it. Traditional Muslim values are the reason for them wanting and end to it. It's understandable to not want children to look up to pirates and the life of crime they lead. But in order for the practice to stop, the pirates want international environmental protections, aid, and government support. Should the international community give into piracy or should it be removed by force?

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Viewfinder: Gaza's Tunnels

This video was interesting to see. It showed me that these people will do anything to earn a living. It's amusing that these people can outsmart the government with the tunnels that they build. Watching the process of how they build the tunnels was interesting. It is sad however to see that in order for them to make a living, they have to risk their lives in these tunnels. They have to build these tunnels in order to smuggle certain goods within the walls of Gaza. It goes to show me what people will do in places in order to survive.
Having 1,000 tunnels built, Israel having their government get rid of them whenever found would be nothing.
This video makes us understand how the goods are being transferred and how it has become a problem, and that these people are doing such dangerous tasks in order to survive.

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 22, 2013 12:09 AM

Amazing to see what people will do to survive.  They are doing this out of necessity.  Many goods they are smuggling are what I believe should be allowed in through normal means, food, water, medicine and anything needed for basic human needs.  I understand the blockade in stopping weapons and items of that nature, but stopping basic foodstuffs is just plain wrong.  The people are living and surviving by these tunnels and built an economy on them.  One thing that was really interesting was at the end when the man seemed he wanted the blockcade to go on or else it would close his tunnel and he would have to get "a real job."  The effects of this blockcade are on both ends of the spectrum, people want it to end so things can return to normal and others want it to go on to continue to make money.

Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 29, 2013 4:20 PM

What some media has led the "western world" to perceive is that many of the people living here would be trying to smuggle illegal goods such as bombs, drugs, etc.  Sure that may be true in some cases, but many times there are respectable citizens which simply need food or necessary items to sustain their lives.  Because of the tight security measures regarding people and goods, the people of Gaza simply try to find a way around the authorities, and the best current option is by tunnels.  Situations like this show that if people really need certain things, with some help and determination, they can achieve that goal.  In the end, hopefully it is for good more often than bad.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 12:09 PM

These tunnels give the Palestinians a way to access a world that has been politically blockaded from them. Connections that allow the sharing of goods are not something that should be avoided. Food and goods could be a way to make a pseudo peace and interdependence between both sides of a centuries old conflict.

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Planting Rice

Watching this video just makes me think about my back.  I have back problems and I'm only in my twenties!  This video goes to show us how important rice is in Thailand; it is the staple crop.  They have to do what they have to do; if it means having to break their backs, then so be it.

I can't even sweep the steps in my house for ten minutes because my back begins to hurt like crazy, so I give credit to these women for the work they do!!

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Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, November 30, 2015 2:45 PM

This is a fantastic video that shows the backbreaking work that is done in order to plant the rice in Thialand. It is all planted by hand and done all by the hands of women who make up almost all of the farming in the area. Thailand is one of the main exporters of rice because of their minimal population compared to others but thrives economically on this export.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 9:17 PM

This video of the rice farming in Thailand shows exactly how hard the rice planting truly is. Here it shows them bending over hour after hour sticking rice plants into the shallow pools. Here in Thailand most of the planters are women. Agriculture is considered the women's job here and have to do all this work themselves. After seeing this it truly is hard work for the mass production of the rice fields so they have a way to export most of this rice they are planting.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 9:36 PM
This looks to be very tedious work, and very labor intensive. There is not much help, that is probably why they are working at the rate they are working at, very fast. Unfortunately, these people are working in these conditions and probably getting paid only cents a day. On top of that, if the weather is not in their favor, they could possibly catch something, maybe pneumonia or something along the lines.
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How did Pakistan get it's name?

How did Pakistan get it's name? | StephanieCGeog400 | Scoop.it

When I learned this in class, it was amusing.  I just had to rescoop this!  Before 1947, the country that is Pakistan once was a British colony!  How the name Pakistan came about was from a group of college students.  They came up with the name Pakistan because they took the first letters of their homelands and put it together.  But get this, the last homeland was Balochistan.  Obviously, this homeland does not begin with the letter "N."  So, what they did was take the last letter from Balochistan, which is the letter "N."  That was how they came up with the name, "Pakistan."  Pakistan means the land of the Paks.  This was interesting to learn how the name came about and what it means!!

Stephanie Cordeiro

 


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Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 28, 2015 3:15 PM

Pakistan is simply abbreviated from it's nations or nations that border Pakistan. P stands for Punjab, A stands for Afghania, K stands for Kashmir, I stands for Iran, S stands for Singh, T stands for Tukharistan, A stands for Afghanistan. However, there is no "N." Instead we classified the last letter as Balochistan but because "stan" is the Persian pronunciation for "country." Pakistan decided to abbreviate "N" as a silent so they can successfully abbreviate "Pakistan" instead of "Pakista."

Matthew Richmond's curator insight, November 9, 2015 3:03 PM

Re-scooped from Professor Dixon, primarily for how ridiculous it is. Most of us figured there was some decent reason (like the neighboring 'Stan's) for why  and how Pakistan got its name. Nope, there really wasn't any good reason to name it Pakistan, it is an acronym. One that makes absolutely no sense whatsoever.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 6:47 PM
Until reading this, I thought this was another country that had a "stan" name just like the rest. I never knew that Pakistan received it's makeshift name my a bunch Cambridge University students. It is composed of lands taken from homelands: Punjab, Afghania,, Kashmir, Iran , Sindh, Tukharistan, Afghanistan, and balochistaN.
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India's Blackout: In The Dark About Being In The Dark : NPR

India's Blackout: In The Dark About Being In The Dark : NPR | StephanieCGeog400 | Scoop.it

This article was very interesting! It is nice to learn things about other countries. For example, if we have a hurricane here in the U.S., and people start talking about power outages, everyone, if not everyone, then most people begin to panic and buy supplies as if it will be extremely chaotic. I never go that crazy; sure I’ll worry, but it won’t be chaotic for me. Whatever happens, happens; that’s how I live. These people in India think the same. They were born and raised with inconvenience. They don’t find that power outages are a crisis, they just find that it is annoying. Sometimes I wish people thought more like the people in India because you just need to let things happen; things will fall into place whether you panic or not; so why panic? That’s how I look at it. Anyhow, awesome article, I enjoyed reading it!!

Stephanie Cordeiro

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Religious Pilgrimage: the Hajj

Religious Pilgrimage: the Hajj | StephanieCGeog400 | Scoop.it

I loved reading this article. I enjoyed reading the captions about their cultural customs.  Even though I am not Muslim, I like to learn about others and how they live their lives. I liked looking through all of these photos.

I’ve always known that Muslims had to attend the hajj because it is one of the pillars for Islamic faith. It was always a question of mine about what would happen if any could not attend the hajj due to certain reasons. My question was answered in class; at least one family member could go attend the hajj, and when they would arrive back home, they would tell their families the stories about what happened and how it was. They would explain everything in depth so that the family members could sense and feel it as if they too went to the hajj.

What I found to be a downer is that if you aren’t Muslim, you cannot go. The hajj is only open to those who are Muslim. This isn’t the faith I practice, but it would have been a cool experience if I were ever able to go, just to see how it all went. Another downer is that I’m claustrophobic; I’d never be able to go there anyways even if I were able to go. So it’s all just ironic for me. Anyhow, I love hearing things about this faith. Nice photos!!

Stephanie Cordeiro


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Elizabeth Allen's comment, December 6, 2012 11:21 PM
The photos show what an immense congregation this event really is. If a picture is worth a thoudsand words, than this collection is a jackpot. The colors are captivating, green costumes of participants in the military parade, the hands holding the beads for sale. In the article from bbc.co.uk it is interesting to learn that such a religious event is an opportunity for economic gains. From merchants selling beads and rugs to visitors all the way to hotels capitalizing on the religious pilgrimage. It is amazing to know that every Muslim should make this trip as long as he/she is healthy and can afford to.
Crissy Borton's curator insight, December 11, 2012 8:55 PM

These photo’s are amazing! Number 12 with the crowd of people and the ambulance in the middle shows the massive amount of people. Their heads look like dots in a sea of white. These pictures show what words just cannot describe. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 1:23 PM

One of the five pillars of Islam is the Hajj. A pilgrimage to mecca that has the byproduct of being economically prosperous. Every year droves of people flock to Mecca. Where they stay, what they eat, what they buy all pump money in the local economy. Although it was not meant to be an economic cash cow, the Hajj definatley provides businesses with an influx of money. This shows how religion definatley has economic repercussion and that all facets of geography are interconnected.

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How They Found National Geographic's "Afghan Girl"

How They Found National Geographic's "Afghan Girl" | StephanieCGeog400 | Scoop.it

I am amazed that Sharbat Gula did not know that a lot of people have seen her picture before, which is a different story itself, but anyhow.  She was such an important icon and it is wonderful that Steve McCurry had finally found her.

I never knew about Sharbat.  I was so amazed by seeing her picture at the refugee camp in Pakistan, and her current picture, that I had to just engage my brother in the topic.  Sharbat was a refugee and she did not deserve to live the life that she did; but that is how life just is for some people.  Life isn't easy for everyone.

What really intrigues me is the fact that the current picture of her, it is twenty years after her picture at the refugee camp.  When I was asked how old she was in the second picture, I knew it was a trick question, but when I found out that it was just twenty years after her first picture, I was shocked.  This was such an interesting article to read!!!

Stephanie Cordeiro

 


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Brian Nicoll's curator insight, December 12, 2012 12:28 AM

While the picture may be famous, she still represents depressing life that the women of her generation live.  I found it interesting that she had no idea that her photo was so iconic.  To have a photo taken of you that was used in for a variety of different things, all while not knowing about it is quite shocking.  As famous as the photo is however, it should not cloud the symbolism that the photo stands for. 

Paige McClatchy's curator insight, October 20, 2013 10:39 PM

I'm so glad that National Geographic found such an exotic specimen in the wild and that the US government graciously put its technology to use to catalog her..... seriously the Western fascination with the image of this Afghan woman, 1 of insanely many, is something I don't get. I think it makes us all feel "cultured" and "informed" when we can sit in the comfort of a dentist or doctor's waiting room and breeze through a Nat Geo cover to cover. A cheap thrill.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 10:38 AM

Her face was a publicity stunt. Her story is sad and is brutal. She was in a refugee camp but her story is only one of many. She didn't know she was the face of National Geographic and people have the image of her in their minds when they think of Aghani women.