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Historical Metropolitan Populations of the United States

Historical Metropolitan Populations of the United States | Step Pedometers | Scoop.it

"The graph and tables on this page attempt to show how the urban hierarchy of the United States has developed over time. The statistic used here is the population of the metropolitan area (contiguous urbanized area surrounding a central city), not the population of an individual city. Metropolitan area population is much more useful than city population as an indicator of the size and importance of a city, since the official boundaries of a city are usually arbitrary and often do not include vast suburban areas. For example, in 2000 San Antonio was the 10th largest city in the U.S., larger than Boston or San Francisco, but its Metro Area was only ranked about 30th. The same thing was happening even back in 1790: New York was the biggest single city, but Philadelphia plus its suburbs of Northern Liberties and Southwark made it the biggest metro area."


Via Seth Dixon
ProHealthcareProducts's insight:

It's fascinating to think about what causes people to migrate in and out of the various metro areas.

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Paige Therien's curator insight, February 3, 2014 11:29 AM

This information is a helpful illustrator for someone who knows about the geography and history of the United States.  It is important to note the use of "metropolitan populations" rather than "city populations" within particular city borders; as the creator states, "boundaries of a city are usually arbitrary".  In other words, the information that can be given from a "city" do not tell the whole story.  Metropolitan areas, even if spanning out of city borders, share similar local culture dynamics, industry, and infrastructure as the core city.  If one was to just examine the cities and not the entire metropolitan areas of the Northeast Megalopolis, they would be missing a huge part of the puzzle. Depending on the time period, the demanded resources, and the available technologies heavily influence how metropoloitan areas work, grow, and interact with others.   This can be seen in the charts and tables.  For example, the availability of the automobile and other transportation methods deeply affected how people and industry move and how metropolitan areas influence and interact with one another.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 17, 2014 10:26 AM

Comparing and contrasting numbers is a huge part of todays world. Looking at this chart, it indicates the size of the population of the whole metropolitan area. The difference in size of cities and of areas differs greatly and the examples provided can show how the area of a city is different that its Metro Area ranking.

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, April 8, 1:55 PM

I was a little confused by this graph at first, as I thought it was measuring population rather than the ranking of the respective metro areas. It is still just as telling, however, even if it is not measuring population. Despite the fact that the lines get a bit jumbled at times, it really is a fascinating graph to look at. It is representative of some tangible and traceable geographic trends that occurred as a result of politics or economics. It is especially interesting to note the decrease in rank of many northeastern metro areas and their replacement by metro areas in the western or central parts of the country. This is, of course, symbolic of the westward expansion of the country during the mid to early 1800s and the decline of the northeast as the dominant population center of the country. 

 

There are some things in particular that are interesting to note as an historian. For instance, New York's almost perfectly constant place as the largest metro area in the country says a lot about where the country is centered economically and socially. The rapid emergence of Los Angeles as a major metro area in the early 1900s speaks to the new wave of immigration that was occurring at that time. These trends, though not shown on or accompanied by a map, are very telling. Anyone with a basic knowledge of geography and U.S. history can see why certain things trend the way that they do. This graph also reinforces my belief that geography is an absolutely pivotal part of history. It is important to know where things are when you are talking about them in an historical context, or else you will have no visual reference or background and events may seem confusing or unclear. 

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Historical Metropolitan Populations of the United States

Historical Metropolitan Populations of the United States | Step Pedometers | Scoop.it

"The graph and tables on this page attempt to show how the urban hierarchy of the United States has developed over time. The statistic used here is the population of the metropolitan area (contiguous urbanized area surrounding a central city), not the population of an individual city. Metropolitan area population is much more useful than city population as an indicator of the size and importance of a city, since the official boundaries of a city are usually arbitrary and often do not include vast suburban areas. For example, in 2000 San Antonio was the 10th largest city in the U.S., larger than Boston or San Francisco, but its Metro Area was only ranked about 30th. The same thing was happening even back in 1790: New York was the biggest single city, but Philadelphia plus its suburbs of Northern Liberties and Southwark made it the biggest metro area."


Via Seth Dixon
ProHealthcareProducts's insight:

It's fascinating to think about what causes people to migrate in and out of the various metro areas.

more...
Paige Therien's curator insight, February 3, 2014 11:29 AM

This information is a helpful illustrator for someone who knows about the geography and history of the United States.  It is important to note the use of "metropolitan populations" rather than "city populations" within particular city borders; as the creator states, "boundaries of a city are usually arbitrary".  In other words, the information that can be given from a "city" do not tell the whole story.  Metropolitan areas, even if spanning out of city borders, share similar local culture dynamics, industry, and infrastructure as the core city.  If one was to just examine the cities and not the entire metropolitan areas of the Northeast Megalopolis, they would be missing a huge part of the puzzle. Depending on the time period, the demanded resources, and the available technologies heavily influence how metropoloitan areas work, grow, and interact with others.   This can be seen in the charts and tables.  For example, the availability of the automobile and other transportation methods deeply affected how people and industry move and how metropolitan areas influence and interact with one another.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 17, 2014 10:26 AM

Comparing and contrasting numbers is a huge part of todays world. Looking at this chart, it indicates the size of the population of the whole metropolitan area. The difference in size of cities and of areas differs greatly and the examples provided can show how the area of a city is different that its Metro Area ranking.

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, April 8, 1:55 PM

I was a little confused by this graph at first, as I thought it was measuring population rather than the ranking of the respective metro areas. It is still just as telling, however, even if it is not measuring population. Despite the fact that the lines get a bit jumbled at times, it really is a fascinating graph to look at. It is representative of some tangible and traceable geographic trends that occurred as a result of politics or economics. It is especially interesting to note the decrease in rank of many northeastern metro areas and their replacement by metro areas in the western or central parts of the country. This is, of course, symbolic of the westward expansion of the country during the mid to early 1800s and the decline of the northeast as the dominant population center of the country. 

 

There are some things in particular that are interesting to note as an historian. For instance, New York's almost perfectly constant place as the largest metro area in the country says a lot about where the country is centered economically and socially. The rapid emergence of Los Angeles as a major metro area in the early 1900s speaks to the new wave of immigration that was occurring at that time. These trends, though not shown on or accompanied by a map, are very telling. Anyone with a basic knowledge of geography and U.S. history can see why certain things trend the way that they do. This graph also reinforces my belief that geography is an absolutely pivotal part of history. It is important to know where things are when you are talking about them in an historical context, or else you will have no visual reference or background and events may seem confusing or unclear. 

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JTech Commander PowerTrack II Muscle Dynamometer MMT [EN-120383] - $975.00 : ProHealthcareProducts.com

JTech Commander PowerTrack II Muscle Dynamometer MMT [EN-120383] - $975.00 : ProHealthcareProducts.com | Step Pedometers | Scoop.it
ProHealthcareProducts.com JTech Commander PowerTrack II Muscle Dynamometer MMT [EN-120383] - JTech Commander PowerTrack II Manual Muscle Testing Dynamometer The Commander PowerTrack adds an advanced dimension to research proven reliable dynamometer...
ProHealthcareProducts's insight:

This device is a popular one for performing manual muscle testing.  ProHealthcareProducts.com sells this device to clinics in the United States and throughout the world.

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ProHealthcareProducts's curator insight, July 26, 2013 8:13 PM

JTech Medical makes this device.  It is used by physical therapists, chiropractors, and other medical doctors to evaluate patients' muscle strength.

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Will A Pedometer Get You Off Your Duff? - KUHF-FM

Will A Pedometer Get You Off Your Duff?
KUHF-FM
Pedometer, an app, keeps track of your steps, distance traveled and calories burned. Benjamin Morris/NPR. Walking is healthier than sitting. Doctors are trying to help get us motivated.
ProHealthcareProducts's insight:

Getting more exercise often involves simply committing to measure your progress.  Step pedometers help with stretching you more.

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Get into shape by the stars - New York Daily News

Get into shape by the stars - New York Daily News | Step Pedometers | Scoop.it
New York Daily News
Get into shape by the stars
New York Daily News
Workout Program- Jump on the treadmill for a long distance run, take up boxing, or book in for the spin class. Sign up for ...
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CNET: The best personal fitness gadgets - Hartford Courant

CNET: The best personal fitness gadgets
Hartford Courant
Its pedometer tracks steps taken, calories burned, and a proprietary measurement of activity called Nike Fuel. ...
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Pedeometers are good for fitness, because they help people track what they've done.

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Step Pedometers for Measuring Walking Distance

Step Pedometers for Measuring Walking Distance | Step Pedometers | Scoop.it
ProHealthcareProducts.com carries a line of step pedometers that can be used to measure walking distance as well as other features. Our step pedometers are made by EKHO, Polar, and other quality brands in the fitness industry.
ProHealthcareProducts's insight:

These pedometers range from simple to multi-functional.

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