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Teach Science through Argument | Stanford Graduate School of Education

Jonathan Osborne aims to better prepare teachers to engage students in the scientific process, helping them to understand how science works.

Jonathan Osborne

Earth orbits the sun. Microorganisms cause infectious disease. Plants use carbon dioxide to grow. Most of us know these scientific truths from our earliest school days. They're accepted facts. But astronomers, microbiologists and botanists once fought for these concepts using arguments based on evidence. Science, it seems, arrives at its tenets through argument.

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Jeremy Yates's curator insight, November 5, 2013 6:11 AM

A great explanation of how Argumentation, through Common Core State Standards, fits into science.  Science isn't about facts, so why do we teach it as a series of facts?

STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming
STEM (Science Technology Education & Mathematics) K-20  education models and innovations
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Before the Robots

Before the Robots | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Five things to consider before implementing robots in your classrooms. GUEST COLUMN | by Andrew Grefig Providing students access to quality technology is often at the heart of many decisions distri...
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Thoughtful.  Importance of setting goals with planning and supports are so important.

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Robots invade classrooms: S$2.8m initiative rolled out to excite students about coding - Channel NewsAsia

Robots invade classrooms: S$2.8m initiative rolled out to excite students about coding - Channel NewsAsia | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Robotics & Maker Academy collaboration between the Infocomm Development Authority (IDA) of Singapore and Singapore Polytechnic (SP) will be rolled out to 30 schools over three years.
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Smart America

Smart America | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
In December of 2013 the SmartAmerica Challenge was launched to bring Industry, Academia and the Government to show how Cyber-Physical Systems (the Internet of Things) can create jobs, new business opportunities and socio-economic benefits to America. On June 11, 2014, 24 teams with over 100 organizations came together at the Washington DC Convention Center for a demonstration. The event was a huge success with keynote remarks by senior government leaders including U.S. Chief Technology Officer Todd Park and General Services Administrator Dan Tangherlini, as well as live demonstrations by 24 SmartAmerica technical teams. The projects showcased ways that the Internet of Things can improve transportation, emergency services, health care, security, energy conservation, and manufacturing. See Expo for the list of speakers and their presentations and News for media coverage. Visit the Challenges for details on the projects.
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New breakthrough could lead to huge battery improvements

New breakthrough could lead to huge battery improvements | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it

A research team at the University of Alberta may have made a breakthrough that ultimately leads to dramatic improvements in the batteries that power everything from laptops and smartphones to medical devices and tools. According to lead researcher Xinwei Cui, the lithium-ion battery technology his team is currently developing charges faster, lasts longer and outputs more power than current lithium-ion batteries.


“What we’ve done is develop a new electrochemistry technology that can provide high energy density and high power density for the next generation,” Cui told Beacon Newsin a recent interview. He continued, “We tried lots of different materials. Normally carbon is used as the anode in lithium-ion batteries, but we used carbon as the cathode, and this is used to build a battery with induced fluorination.”

The scientist explained in a recently published paper that carbon cathodes are inexpensive and safe to use, and the energy output of Cui’s team’s batteries is between five and eight times higher than lithium-ion batteries currently on the market. The tech is also delivering better results than several other next-generation battery technologies currently in development, as Beacon News noted.

“Nobody knew that carbon could be used as a cathode with such a high performance. That is what’s unique with our technology and what is detailed in our paper,” Cui said.

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Imagine Cup Day at MOHAI 2014 | Microsoft Imagine Cup

Imagine Cup Day at MOHAI 2014 | Microsoft Imagine Cup | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Microsoft Imagine Cup

 

Imagine Cup Day at MOHAIWHEN?Saturday, August 2, 2014 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.WHERE?860 Terry Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109Admission is free and open to the publicMeet the Future. Bring the Family.Check out new technology projects made by students from over 30 countriesMeet the students, play the games, try the techTake a spin in the Lotus F1 Simulator, sponsored by AvanadeHands-on Mad Science activities for kidsFree family concerts by the D20 Brass Band and the School of RockIncredible hip hop dancing by the Massive MonkeesMeet Blitz, the Seattle Seahawks mascotFree admission to MOHAI, the Museum of History and Industry, all dayFree snacks!Avanade is a presenting sponsor of Imagine Cup Day at MOHAI

Bring your extra school supplies to help Seattle students in need! We're partnering with the Boys & Girls Clubs of King County to collect your donations of school supplies so students are ready for the new school year.

Highlighting innovation and education, MOHAI collects and preserves the diverse history of Seattle and Puget Sound in an effort to inspire people to create a better future for themselves and their communities. Their mission is to spark the innovator in all of us!

On Saturday, August 2, MOHAI and Microsoft will host Imagine Cup Day when the museum will open its doors to the public for free and the Imagine Cup world finalists will showcase their projects as part of a special one-day only event. Residents of Seattle are invited to meet our students and see their projects in action.

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How Would You Design a Bicycle?

How Would You Design a Bicycle? | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Learning to ride a bicycle is a strong memory from many of our childhoods. How did you learn how to ride a bicycle? What would you change about how today's bicycles are designed?
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NASA's Mars Curiosity Rover Marks First Anniversary With New Selfie

NASA's Mars Curiosity Rover Marks First Anniversary With New Selfie | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
NASA's Mars Curiosity rover will complete its first Martian year on June 24th
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An Innovative Community Solar Program from NRG and...Boeing?

An Innovative Community Solar Program from NRG and...Boeing? | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Community solar takes off with innovative partnership between NRG, Boeing, Sol Orchard, and California's Imperial Water District.
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Hire the hackers!

Hire the hackers! | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Despite multibillion-dollar investments in cybersecurity, one of its root problems has been largely ignored: who are the people who write malicious code? Underworld investigator Misha Glenny profiles several convicted coders from around the world and reaches a startling conclusion.
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Knowledge Without Borders - Lifelong learning about the world

Knowledge Without Borders - Lifelong learning about the world | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Visual thinking can sometimes be better than words when brainstorming, asking questions and connecting ideas previously thought to be unconnectable. And mind mapping makes visual thinking come alive.  The old saying,
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 Powerful messaging here

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Linda Hill and Emily Truelove: Collective Genius - The Art and Practice of Leading Innovation - YouTube

Harvard Book Store welcomed Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School Linda Hill and MIT Sloan School of Management researcher Emily Tr...
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New Aluminum-Air Battery Powered Car Travels 1,800 Miles Without a Recharge | World Future Society

New Aluminum-Air Battery Powered Car Travels 1,800 Miles Without a Recharge | World Future Society | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it

Back in April of 2012 I wrote about the evolution of battery technology for electric cars. In the posting I wrote about lithium-ion and lithium-air technology. What I didn't know was that a company named Phinergy was working on a different type of metal-air battery using aluminum and zinc plus air.

This week Phinergy, an Israeli company, along with the aluminum giant, Alcoa Canada, demonstrated an electric vehicle (EV) capable of driving 1,800 kilometers (over 1,100 miles between charges) using a combination of aluminum-air and lithium-ion storage technologies. The Phinergy aluminum-air battery at 100 kilograms (220 pounds) weight contained enough on board energy to allow the vehicle to travel up to 3,000 kilometers (over 1,860 miles). Compare that to the best, current lithium-ion batteries in the Tesla Model S sedan. At best they can do less than 500 kilometers (310 miles) on a single charge and the on board battery weighs 5 times as much.

How does an aluminum-air battery work? They use an air-electrode capable of breathing ambient air and extracting the oxygen from it. Compare this to traditional batteries which store and release oxygen from chemicals contained in a liquied or solid cathode. An air battery doesn't need to replace or recharge its cathode. And an air battery is far lighter. The combination means significantly more power for a longer period of time.

 

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Where the Internet of Things Could Take Society by 2025

Where the Internet of Things Could Take Society by 2025 | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Experts share their thoughts on how connected devices, appliances and vehicles could affect everyday life down the road.

 

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Picture this: A world flooded with a sea of data from every connected device on the planet -- devices found in and on human bodies, in homes, around communities, in products, and in the natural environment. And these devices on the Internet of Things are sharing information constantly with the promise of making people's lives better.  But the government, corporations and criminals can all tap into these data streams and use what they find for evil, if they so choose. And that tension comes through loud and clear in a report on the Internet of Things that includes opinions from more than 1,600 experts.   The Pew Research Center Internet Project and Elon University's Imagining the Internet Center released the report on Wednesday, May 14, as part of an ongoing future of the Internet series inspired by the Web's 25th anniversary. Eighty-three percent of these experts, which included education leaders, agreed that the Internet of Things would have "widespread and beneficial effects on the everyday lives of the public by 2025." The remaining 17 percent said it would not, and both camps elaborated on their answers in paragraph form.  Their explanations fall under six major points: The Internet of Things and wearable computing will take major steps forward in the next 11 years. Increased data from connected things will cause privacy concerns to come to the forefront and encourage the growth of profiling and targeting people, which will greatly inflame conflicts in various arenas. Despite advancement in information interfaces, most people won't be connecting their brains to the network.  Complicated, unintended consequences will arise. A digital divide could deepen and disenfranchise people who don't choose to connect to the network. Relationships will change depending on people's response to the Internet of Things.  Through 2025, wearable health apps represent the biggest change for Jim Hendler, a professor of Computer Science at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He suggests in his response that they will continue to improve and become more specialized to help people who want to be healthier.  While it's up in the air as to whether Google Glass will be popular or fail in the next decade, the idea of a device that overlays information onto the physical world will stick around, said David Clark, senior research scientist at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory.   read more
Dr. Gordon Dahlby's insight:

Thinking that 'things' will soon include a full range of transportation options for on-demand including driver-less; if governments plan for and give up reliance on the revenues of franchise fees, taxi taxes and petroleum taxes. IMHO

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France to offer programming in elementary school

France to offer programming in elementary school | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Beginning this fall, French primary school students will have the option of learning computer science

 

The French are known for lots of things, such as their love of good food, fine wine and great art. It appears now that, if the government has its way, the French will soon also be known for something else: their computer programming prowess.

 

France’s Minister of National Education, Benoît Hamon, said in a recent interview with Le Journal du Dimanche that programming courses will be offered to primary school students starting this fall. The courses, which will be optional and offered during extracurricular time, will teach students programming basics and how to create simple applications. Hamon also expressed a desire that programming be offered at the secondary school level. The goal, he said, is to give French students the keys to thrive in a connected world and to encourage them go into technical vocations.

Some questions as to how this will work remain to be answered. For example, who will teach the courses? Hamon suggested that some, like math teachers, will be more naturally inclined than others. He also said that 9,000 French schools that currently do not have broadband access will have it by September. Also, Hamon gave no specifics about the actual curriculum, like what languages would be taught.

France is just the latest in a line of countries that are encouraging or even requiring that students as young as those in elementary school learn programming. Here are some examples of other countries that have already implemented or will soon implement such programs.

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Interview with Arun Gupta on Devoxx4Kids | Opensource.com

Interview with Arun Gupta on Devoxx4Kids | Opensource.com | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Learn more about an international organization which helps introduce school kids to programming, robotics and engineering in a fun way
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Change the Equation

Change the Equation | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
STEMworks Welcome to the the STEMworks application website, a portal for STEM learning programs that are interested in applying to Change the Equation's STEMworks database of effective STEM learning programs. STEMworks is a leading resource for businesses that are looking for proven programs that meet their philanthropic priorities. It houses an expanding number of STEM learning programs that have met CTEq's rigorous Design Principles and Rubric for Effective STEM Philanthropy. Business leaders, other funders, and STEM advocates search STEMworks for programs that are most likely to help them maximize the impact of their investments. STEMworks is accepting new applications from July 14 through September 12! For more information about the application process, visit the How it Works page. STEMworks was created in collaboration with WestEd, an independent, nonprofit research, development, and service organization.
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Brainstorm Tech panel: Education is the real way to get more women into tech

Brainstorm Tech panel: Education is the real way to get more women into tech | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Harvey Mudd's Maria Klawe, Hearsay Social CEO Clara Shih, and Cisco CEO John Chambers spoke with Time Inc CTO Colin Bodell at Fortune's Brainstorm Tech conference.
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New Tech Network (NTN) to become an independent non-profit organization

KnowledgeWorks Announces New Partnership in New Tech Network to Expand Innovative Learning and Student Achievement 

Napa, Ca July 1, 2014– The KnowledgeWorks Foundation announced today it will spinout California-based New Tech Network (NTN) to become an independent non-profit organization, in order to advance NTN to the next stage of the innovative school network’s growth.

The spinout is being led by long time NTN supporter and KnowledgeWorks board member Barry Schuler. The Schuler Family Fund has agreed to seed an initial $10 million grant and KnowledgeWorks is committing an additional $1.5 million. Schuler is spearheading additional development and matching efforts. The new financial support for NTN will fund
ongoing operations and new program initiatives.

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Google aims to close the tech gender gap with $50 million fund to get girls coding

Google aims to close the tech gender gap with $50 million fund to get girls coding | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Chelsea Clinton and Mindy Kaling kick off Google's 'Made With Code' initiative to get more girls interested in engineering and computer science
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Classrooms working on open source projects | Opensource.com

How to get a class involved with an open source project

Posted 27 Jun 2013 by 

Ruth Suehle(Red Hat)
 
Image by : opensource.com
We talk about "community" a lot when it comes to open source, but it's important to remember that just like local communities within a city, town, state, and country, each community has its own culture. One community is not just like another. Each has its own ways of communication and tracking and decision-making. Processes for code submission differ—perhaps two communities both use Bugzilla, but with different flags. Others require you to also alert a mailing list. A large software project may even have smaller sub-communities within it with their own customs and quirks.

Learning these differences is important to the success of your involvement in an open source project, and students need to understand these nuances when they're getting involved. For this year's POSSE class, Heidi Ellis and Joanie Diggs offered suggestions that apply broadly to getting yourself as an instructor and a class involved in a community.

Be productively lost. Maybe you've gotten involved in a large community, and you simply feel lost. The scope is just too broad. The best thing you can do is learn whom to ask when you have questions.

Give back. FOSS survives on contributions. It's core to the process. You can pay back in documentation, reviews, and testing—all sorts of ways that don't necessarily involve code. Small contributions are valuable! And eventually you can be the resource for the next newcomer who has questions like you once did.

Opportunism reigns. FOSS development tends to be highly opportunistic, which means your plan for a 10-15 week term may fall apart two weeks into the semester. Recognize that and be prepared.

If it isn't public, it didn't happen. Decisions in FOSS are made only on public artifacts, including mailing lists, forums, and IRC. If it's not public, it's not accountable, and it's not a contribution. Ideas are shared before they're perfect, and that's OK. Get used to public communication, and get your students used to it as well.

Ask forgiveness, not permission. Very little in FOSS can't be reverted. Try new things. Something may turn out to not be in line with the community's intentions, but it may turn out to be interesting and useful to them after all. Branches are free, and sometimes odd experiments have interesting results.

Keep a history. Version control helps a lot—history-keeping should be automatic whenever possible. History helps students understand the project and gives you context for why the project is headed in a particular direction. It also helps someone else pick up where the previous contributor—like a student leaving at the end of a term—left off.

Finally, remember that at the end of the course, it's better to communicate undone work than to do uncommunicated work. Students need to gracefully hand off their work. Have them document what's remaining to do and try to find someone to continue it (and make it better) or leave it in a place that's easy to find with a clear note that it needs a maintainer. The contribution isn't complete until a handoff has been achieved.

POSSE (Professor's Open Source Summer/Software Experience) is professional development for instructors interested in student participation in free and open source software. This post is based on a presentation at POSSE 2013 by Joanie Diggs and Heidi Ellis.

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The campaign to pave American roads with solar panels just passed a whopping $2 million in donations

The campaign to pave American roads with solar panels just passed a whopping $2 million in donations | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it

A daring plot to pave roadways with solar panels has raised over $2 milliondespite questions about the costs and effectiveness of such a network. Scott and Julie Brusaw have received more than 40,000 donations — the most ever on the crowdfunding platform Indiegogo — and they’ve come from all 50 states and 42 countries.

“It’s very humbling that people all around the world are getting behind this,” said Scott Brusaw, an electrical engineer, who launched the campaign with his wife. “We’ve had people call from all over the world to tell us, ‘When you build the first parking lots, let us know because we’ll fly there just to say we’ve walked on it.’ It’ll bring a crowd to town.”

The campaign launched to little fanfare on April 21, but interest picked up as celebrities weighed in on social media, and an attention-grabbing YouTube video went viral. Since being published May 18, the seven-minute video has been viewed more than 15 million times.

 

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Dr. Gordon Dahlby's insight:

Very interesting video.

 

Really like to disruptive nature.  Could start w/ low volume roads.

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Hackers: the Internet's immune system

Hackers: the Internet's immune system | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
The beauty of hackers, says cybersecurity expert Keren Elazari, is that they force us to evolve and improve. Yes, some hackers are bad guys, but many are working to fight government corruption and advocate for our rights. By exposing vulnerabilities, they push the Internet to become stronger and healthier, wielding their power to create a better world.
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Pathways to Participation for Preservice Teachers - edWeb

Pathways to Participation for Preservice Teachers - edWeb | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Pathways to Participation for Preservice Teachers, a report just released by edWeb.net, looks at how online networks can help preservice and new teachers connect with practicing educators who can provide them with the knowledge, resources, mentoring and general support they will need to be successful in the classroom.

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Mobile Devices: 70 Percent of School Districts Have Substantial Deployments -- THE Journal

Mobile Devices: 70 Percent of School Districts Have Substantial Deployments -- THE Journal | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Mobile may once have been proscribed tech on American K-12 campuses, but it now enjoys a "substantial presence in most school districts." According to a new report, more than two-thirds of school districts in the United States have mobile technologies deployed in a significant number of their classrooms.
Dr. Gordon Dahlby's insight:

$349 for the report

70% seems exaggerated 

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NOVA | Earth From Space

NOVA | Earth From Space | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Detailed satellite images reveal the web of connections that sustain life on Earth.
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amazing and produced well

 

And free

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