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FCC Launches Update of E-Rate for Broadband in Schools and Libraries | FCC.gov

FCC Launches Update of E-Rate for Broadband in Schools and Libraries | FCC.gov | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
I.              IntroductionIn this Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM), we initiate a thorough review and update of the E-rate program (more formally known as the schools and libraries universal service support mechanism), building on reforms adopted in 2010 as well as the Commission’s reforms of each of the other universal service programs.  During the past 15 years, the financial support provided by the E-rate program has helped revolutionize schools’ and libraries’ access to modern communications networks.  E-rate-supported Internet connections are crucial for learning and for the operation of modern schools and libraries.[1]  Increasingly, schools and libraries require high-capacity broadband[2] connections to take advantage of digital learning technologies that hold the promise of substantially improving educational experiences and expanding opportunity for students, teachers, parents and whole communities.[3]  As a result, there is a growing chorus of calls to build on the success of the E-rate program by modernizing the program and adopting clear forward-looking goals aimed at efficiently and effectively ensuring high-capacity connections to schools and libraries nationwide.E-rate has been instrumental in ensuring our schools and libraries have the connectivity necessary to enable students and library patrons to participate in the digital world.  When Congress passed the Telecommunications Act of 1996 authorizing the creation of the E-rate program, only 14 percent of classrooms had access to the Internet, and most schools with Internet access (74 percent) used dial-up Internet access.[4]  By 2005, nearly all schools had access to the Internet, and 94 percent of all instructional classrooms had Internet access.[5]  Similarly, by 2006, nearly all public libraries were connected to the Internet, and 98 percent of them offered public Internet access.[6]  The challenge we now face is modernizing the program to ensure that our nation’s students and communities have access to high-capacity broadband connections that support digital learning while making sure that the program remains fiscally responsible and fair to the consumers and businesses that pay into the universal service fund (USF or Fund).In schools, high-capacity broadband connectivity, combined with cutting-edge educational tools and content, is transforming learning by providing customized teaching opportunities, giving students and teachers access to interactive content, and offering assessments and analytics that provide students, their teachers, and their parents, real-time information about student performance.[7]  High-capacity broadband is also expanding the boundaries of our schools by allowing for interactive and collaborative distance learning applications, providing all students – from rural communities to inner cities – access to high-quality courses and expert instruction, no matter how small a school they attend or how far they live from experts in their field of study.  High-capacity broadband platforms and the educational options they enable are particularly crucial for providing all students, in both rural and urban communities, customized and personalized education and access to cutting-edge learning tools in the areas of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education, thus preparing our students to compete in the global economy.In libraries, high-capacity broadband access provides patrons the ability to search for and apply for jobs; learn new skills; interact with federal, state, local, and Tribal government agencies; search for health-care and other crucial information; make well-informed purchasing decisions; engage in life-long learning; and stay in touch with friends and family.  In Idaho, for example, the state agency’s Libraries Linking Idaho database portal, available in all Idaho libraries, provides essential resources to library patrons such as an online video encyclopedia and a program to provide tools for test preparation and skill-building.[8]  Additionally, the Chicago Public Library’s YOUMedia and The Labs at the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh offer young people an opportunity to produce rich, multi-media products using the latest technology tools while connecting these learning experiences directly back to school and careers.[9]  Further, the Howard County Public Library in Maryland houses a Learning Lab to engage young adults in using new and emerging media and technology.[10]  Libraries are uniquely important because they provide Internet access to all residents in communities they serve.[11]  In addition, libraries support distance learning and continuing education for college and adult students.[12]    There is strong evidence and growing consensus that E-rate needs to sharpen its focus and provide schools and libraries with high-capacity broadband connections.  In response to a 2010 Commission survey of E-rate funded schools and libraries, only 10 percent of survey respondents reported broadband speeds of 100 Mbps or greater, while 48 percent reported broadband speeds of less than 10 Mbps.[13]  Approximately 39 percent of the respondents cited cost of service as a barrier in meeting their needs, and 27 percent cited cost of installation as a barrier.[14] Likewise, although the speeds of library connections have been increasing over time, many libraries report that speeds are insufficient to meet their growing needs.  An annual survey done by the American Library Association (ALA) shows that in 2011-2012, while 9 percent of libraries reported connection speeds of greater than 100 Mbps, 25 percent of libraries still have speeds of 1.5 Mbps or less, and approximately 62 percent of libraries reported connection speeds of 10 Mbps or less.[15]  Thus, notwithstanding the trend towards faster speeds, 41 percent of libraries reported that their speeds fail to meet their patrons’ needs some or most of the time.[16] Last month, President Obama announced the ConnectED initiative aimed at connecting all schools to the digital age.[17]  The ConnectED initiative seeks to connect schools and libraries serving 99 percent of our students to next-generation high-capacity broadband (with speeds of no less than 100 Mbps and a target speed of 1 Gbps) and to provide high-capacity wireless connectivity within those schools and libraries within five years.[18]  President Obama has called on the Commission to modernize and leverage the E-rate program to help meet those targets.  Teachers, local school officials, state education leaders, digital learning experts, and businesses from across the country endorsed President Obama’s vision and have called for an update to the E-rate program to meet today’s teaching and learning needs.[19] In voicing his support for President Obama’s ConnectED initiative, Senator John D. Rockefeller IV, one of the original supporters of the E-rate program, explained: “[I]n its almost two decades, the E-Rate program has fundamentally transformed education in this country – we have connected our most remote schools and libraries to the world.  But as impressive and important as the E-Rate program has been, basic Internet connectivity is no longer sufficient to meet our 21st Century educational needs.”[20]  Even more recently, the bipartisan Leading Education by Advancing Digital (LEAD) Commission has taken up the call and released a blue print for paving a path to digital learning in the United States which    highlights “inadequate high-speed Internet connectivity in the classrooms” as “the most immediate and expensive barrier to implementing technology in education,” and calls modernizing E-rate the “centerpiece of solving the infrastructure challenge.”[21]The need for E-rate reform is also clear given the extraordinary demand for existing E-rate support.  For this funding year,[22] schools and libraries sought E-rate funding in excess of $4.9 billion, more than twice the annual cap of $2.25 billion.[23]  The E-rate funding cap was set by the Commission when it created the E-rate program in 1997 and demand for funds has exceeded the cap every year since the inception of the program.[24]  Moreover, technology is constantly evolving, so to be most effective, the E-rate program must evolve to meet the current and future needs of schools and libraries. Therefore, in this NPRM, we seek to modernize E-rate to ensure that it can most efficiently and effectively help schools and libraries meet their connectivity needs over the course of the rest of this decade and the next.Three years ago, the Commission took important initial steps to modernize E-rate to improve efficiency and respond to the increasing technological needs of schools and libraries in response to recommendations made in the National Broadband Plan.[25]  The reforms, adopted in the Schools and Libraries Sixth Report and Order, focused on: (1) providing greater flexibility to schools and libraries in their selection of the most cost-effective broadband services; (2) streamlining the E-rate application process; and (3) improving safeguards against fraud, waste, and abuse.[26]  Among other things, the Commission allowed schools and libraries to lease dark fiber from any entity, including state, municipal or regional research networks and utility companies;[27] made permanent a rule to allow schools to open their facilities to the public when schools are not in session so that community members may use the school’s E-rate supported services on the school’s campus;[28] and established the Learning On-The-Go (also known as E-rate Deployed Ubiquitously (EDU) 2011) pilot program to investigate the merits and challenges of wireless off-premises connectivity services for mobile learning devices.[29]In this NPRM, we seek comment on ways to build on these steps and more comprehensively modernize E-rate, including improving the efficiency and administration of the program.  We begin by proposing explicit program goals and seeking comment on specific ways to measure our progress towards meeting those goals.  During the last two years, the Commission has established goals and measures as part of modernizing the three other universal service support programs.[30]  Today, we propose to do the same for the E-rate program.  We then seek comment on a number of possible approaches to achieving each of our proposed goals.Thus, the balance of this NPRM is organized into the following six sections:In Section II, we propose three goals for the E-rate program:

(1) Ensuring schools and libraries have affordable access to 21st Century broadband that supports digital learning;

(2) Maximizing the cost-effectiveness of E-rate funds; and

(3) Streamlining the administration of the E-rate program. 

We also propose to adopt measures for each of the proposed goals. 

In proposing to adopt specific goals and measures, we seek to focus available funds on the highest communications priorities for schools and libraries and, over time, to determine whether E-rate funds are effectively targeted to meet those goals.

In Section III, we focus on the first proposed goal and seek comment on ways to modernize and reform the E-rate program to better ensure eligible schools and libraries have affordable access to high-capacity broadband.  First, we propose to focus E-rate funds on supporting high-capacity broadband to and within schools and libraries, and we seek comment on updating the list of services eligible for E-rate support.  Second, we seek comment on various options for ensuring equitable access to limited E-rate funding.  Finally, we seek comment on what other measures we could take if these steps, combined with the other efficiency measures proposed elsewhere in this NPRM, appear insufficient to meet our program goals.  In particular, we seek comment on potential options to focus additional state, local, and federal funding on school connectivity and to lower the costs of new high-capacity broadband deployment to schools and libraries. In Section IV, we focus on the second proposed goal and seek comment on maximizing the cost-effectiveness of E-rate purchases, including how we can encourage increased consortium purchasing; create bulk buying opportunities; increase transparency of spending and prices; amend the competitive bidding processes; and encouraging efficient use of funding.  We also seek comment on a pilot program to incent and test more efficient purchasing practices. In Section V, we focus on the third proposed goal and seek comment on ways to streamline the administration of the E-rate program by, among other things, requiring electronic filing of all documents with the E-rate program Administrator, the Universal Service Administrative Company (USAC); increasing transparency of USAC’s processes; speeding USAC’s review of E-rate applications; simplifying the eligible services list; finding more efficient ways to disburse E-rate funds; addressing unused E-rate funding; and streamlining the E-rate appeals process.In Section VI, we seek comment on several additional issues relating to the E-rate program that have been raised by stakeholders, including issues related to school and library obligations under the Children’s Internet Protection Act (CIPA); identifying rural schools and libraries; changes to the National School Lunch Program; fraud protection measures; use of E-rate supported services for community Wi-Fi hotspots; and procedures for dealing with national emergencies.

In seeking comment on our proposed goals and measures, and on options to modernize E-rate to better align it with these goals, in addition to specific questions posed throughout, we encourage input from Tribal governments and ask generally whether there are any unique circumstances on Tribal lands that would necessitate a different approach.  Similarly, we request comment on whether there are any unique circumstances in insular areas that would necessitate a different approach.


[1] State Educational Technology Directors Association (SETDA), The Broadband Imperative:  Recommendation to Address K-12 Educational Infrastructure Needs, at 10 (rel. May 21, 2012), available at http://www.setda.org/web/guest/broadbandimperative (  last visited July 15, 2013) (SETDA Recommendation).  See generally Charles M. Davidson and Michael J. Santorelli, The Impact of Broadband on Education:  A Study Commissioned by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce (December 2010) available at http://www.uschamber.com/sites/default/files/about/US_Chamber_Paper_on_Broadband_and_Education.pdf  (last visited July 15, 2013).

[2] We use the term “high-capacity broadband” in this NPRM to describe the evolving level of connectivity schools and libraries need as they increasingly adopt new, innovative digital learning strategies.

[3] SETDA, The Broadband Imperative:  Recommendation to Address K-12 Educational Infrastructure Needs, at 10 (rel. May 21, 2012), available at http://www.setda.org/web/guest/broadbandimperative  (last visited July 15, 2013) (SETDA Recommendation).

[4] See U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Internet Access in U.S. Public Schools and Classrooms: 1994-2001 (2002), available at http://www.immagic.com/eLibrary/ARCHIVES/GENERAL/US_ED/NCES2018.pdf (last visited July 15, 2013); U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, Internet Access in U.S. Public Schools and Classrooms: 1994-2005, at 4-5, 16 (2006), available at http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2007/2007020.pdf (last visited July 15,  2013).

[5] See id. at 4-5. 

[6] See Information Use Management and Policy Institute, College of Information, Florida State University, Public Libraries and the Internet 2006:  Study Results and Findings, at 7 (2006), available at http://www.ii.fsu.edu/Solutions/Public-Libraries-The-Internet/Reports (last visited July 15, 2013).

[7] See, e.g., Foundation for Excellence in Education, Digital Learning Now! at 11-12 (rel. Dec. 1, 2010), available at http://www.digitallearningnow.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/Digital-Learning-Now-Report-FINAL1.pdf) (last visited July 15, 2013).

[8] See American Libraries Association, Libraries Connect Communities: Public Library Funding & Technology Access Study 2011-2012, American Libraries Magazine, at 41 (rel. summer 2012), available at http://viewer.zmags.com/publication/4673a369#/4673a369/1 (last visited July 15, 2013) (ALA Summer 2012 Report).

[9] Letter from Emily Sheketoff, Executive Director, American Library Association, to the Honorable Barack Obama, President of the United States, CC Docket 02-6, at 1 (dated July 8, 2013).

[10] Id.

[11] Id. at 2.

[12] Id. at 1.

[13] See Federal Communications Commission, 2010 E-rate Program and Broadband Usage Survey: Report, at 4-5 (Wireline Comp. Bur. 2011), 26 FCC Rcd 1, available at http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DA-10-2414A1.pdf (last visited July 15, 2013) (E-rate Program and Broadband Survey). 

[14] Id. at 2, 9.

[15] See ALA Summer 2012 Report at 23. 

[16] Id. at 23-24.

[17] See The White House, Office of the Press Secretary, ConnectED:  President Obama’s plan for Connecting All Schools to the Digital Age available at http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/docs/connected_fact_sheet.pdf (last visited July 15, 2013) (ConnectED Fact Sheet).

[18] Id.

[19] See, e.g., Press Release, Jay Rockefeller, Promises Made, Promises Kept: Rockefeller Program that Expands Internet Access for WV Schools, Libraries Gets Major Boost (June 6, 2013), available at http://www.rockefeller.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/press-releases?ID=2c487a72-7b98-456f-b723-278fc11a2202 (last visited July 15, 2013); Press Release, Statement of NCTA President & CEO Michael Powell Regarding the President’s ConnectED Initiative (June 6, 2013), available at http://www.ncta.com/news-and-events/media-room/article/2774 (last visited July 15, 2013); Press Release, AT&T Chairman & CEO Randall Stephenson, AT&T Response to President Obama's ConnectED Plan (June 6, 2013), available at  http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/att-response-to-president-obamas-connected-plan-210464851.html (last visited July 15, 2013); Press Release, Verizon Senior Vice President of Public Policy and Government Affairs, Verizon Response to President Obama’s ConnectED Plan (June 6, 2013) (on file with Commission); Obama Pushes for Higher Speed Broadband in Schools, by Grant Gross, IDG News Service, (June 6, 2013) available at http://www.cio.com/article/734558/Obama_Pushes_for_Higher_Speed_Broadband_in_Schools (last visited July 15, 2013) (quoting Comcast’s Sena Fitzmaurice, vice president of government communications); John Chambers, Cisco Statement on White House E-Rate Announcement, Cisco Blog (June 6, 2013, 2:44 PM) available at http://blogs.cisco.com/news/cisco-statement-on-white-house-e-rate-announcement (last visited July 15, 2013); Press Release, Statement of LEAD Commission, Lee Bollinger, Jim Coulter, Margaret Spellings, Jim Steyer, Lead Applauds ConnectED Intiative (June 6, 2013), available at http://www.leadcommission.org/news/statement-lead-applauds-connected-initiative (last visited July 15, 2013); Press Release, CEO of NTCA Shirley Bloomfield, NTCA CEO Comments on White House ConnectED Initiative (June 6, 2013), available at http://www.ntca.org/2013-press-releases/ntca-ceo-comments-on-white-house-connected-initiative.html (last visited July 15, 2013); Press Release, CEO of ISTE Brian Lewis, International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) Applauds President Obama’s ConnectED Initiative (June 6, 2013), available at http://www.iste.org/news/news-details/2013/06/06/international-society-for-technology-in-education-(iste)-applauds-president-obama-s-connected-initiative (last visited July 15, 2013); Press Release, CEO of Consortium for School Networking (CoSN) Keith Kruger, ‘Giant Leap” Forward with ConnectED (June 6, 2013), available at http://www.cosn.org/Portals/7/docs/Press%20Releases/2013/CoSNStatementConnectED6June13FINAL.pdf (last visited July 15, 2013); Press Release, National School Boards Association, NSBA Welcomes President’s Plan to Improve Schools’ Internet Access, (June 6, 2013) available at http://www.nsba.org/newsroom/press-releases/nsba-welcomes-presidents-plan-to-improve-schools-internet-access.html.aspx (last visited July 15, 2013); Press Release, American Library Association, ALA welcomes White House call for increased E-rate funding for libraries and schools, (June 6, 2013) available at http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2013/06/ala-welcomes-white-house-call-increased-e-rate-funding-libraries-and-schools (last visited July 15, 2013); Press Release, Council of Chief State School Officers, CCSSO Statement on ConnectED Initiative Announcement (June 6, 2013), available at http://www.ccsso.org/News_and_Events/Press_Releases/CCSSO_Statement_on_ConnectED_Initiative_Announcement.html (last visited July 15, 2013); Press Release, President of Alliance for Excellent Education Gov. Bob Wise, Gov. Bob Wise Comments on President Obama’s “ConnectED” Plan to Provide Schools with High-Speed Internet Access (June 6, 2013), available at http://www.all4ed.org/press_room/press_releases/06062013 (last visited July 15, 2013); Press Release, National Association of Secondary School Principals, Principals Believe Better Internet Access Will Open More Doors (June 6, 2013), available at  http://www.nassp.org/Content.aspx?topic=Principals_Believe_Better_Internet_Access_Will_Open_More_Doors (last visited July 15, 2013).

[20] See Press Release, U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, & Transportation, Rockefeller says E-rate Should Expand to Connect More Students to High Speed Broadband (June 6, 2013), available at http://www.commerce.senate.gov/public/index.cfm?p=PressReleases&ContentRecord_id=5cb24ad3-281e-4abd-acd0-afb699008e3e&ContentType_id=77eb43da-aa94-497d-a73f-5c951ff72372&Group_id=505cc3fa-a767-40f4-8ac2-4b8326b44e94 (last visited July 15, 2013).

[21] See LEAD Commission, LEAD’s National Educational Technology Initiative – a Five Point Plan  available at http://www.leadcommission.org/sites/default/files/LEAD%20Commission%20Blueprint.pdf (last visited July 15, 2013).

[22] Each funding year (FY) runs from July 1 of that year through June 30 of the following year.

[23] See Letter from Mel Blackwell, Vice President, USAC, to Julie Veach, Chief, Wireline Competition Bureau (April 22, 2013), available at http://www.usac.org/_res/documents/sl/pdf/tools/news/FY2013-Demand-Estimate.pdf (last visited July 15, 2013) (2013 USAC Demand Letter). 

[24] See Federal-State Joint Board on Universal Service, CC Docket No. 96-45, Report and Order, 12 FCC Rcd 8776, 9054-55 at paras. 529-31 (Universal Service First Report and Order).  As discussed below, the Commission began indexing the cap to inflation in 2010, and in 2003 the Commission provided for unused funds for previous years to be carried forward to subsequent funding years.  See infra paras. 59, 62-63; see also E-rate Funding Requested vs. Available and Disbursed Chart (FY 1998-2011) (Appendix C).

[25] Federal Communications Commission,  Connecting America: The National Broadband Plan, (National Broadband Plan), available at http://www.broadband.gov/download-plan (last visited July 15, 2013); Schools and Libraries Universal Service Support Mechanism, A National Broadband Plan for our Future, CC Docket No. 02-6, GN Docket No. 09-51, Order, 25 FCC Rcd 18762 (2010) (Schools and Libraries Sixth Report and Order).

[26] Schools and Libraries Sixth Report and Order, 25 FCC Rcd at 18764-65, para. 6.

[27] Id. at 18765-73, paras. 8-19.

[28] Id. at 18773-77, paras. 20-27.

[29] Id. at 18783-87, paras. 41-50.

[30] See Connect America Fund et al., WC Docket No. 10-90 et al., Report and Order and Further Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, 26 FCC Rcd 17663, 17681-17683, paras. 48-59 (2011) (USF/ICC Transformation Order); Lifeline and Link Up Reform and Modernization et al., WC Docket Nos. 12-23, 11-42, 03-109, CC Docket No. 96-45, Report and Order and Further Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, 27 FCC Rcd 6656, 6671-77, paras. 27-43 (2012) (Lifeline Reform Order); Rural Health Care Support Mechanism, WC Docket No. 02-60, Report and Order, 27 FCC Rcd 16678, 16696-99, paras. 34-43 (2012) (Healthcare Connect Fund Order).

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Dennis T OConnor's comment, July 24, 2013 2:54 PM
Suggest you post the pdf using the NewPost feature. It will read more easily and not take up so much screen space.
STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming
STEM (Science Technology Education & Mathematics) K-20  education models and innovations
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Innovations Designed for Deeper Learning in Higher Education | EDUCAUSE.edu

Innovations Designed for Deeper Learning in Higher Education | EDUCAUSE.edu | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
INNOVATIONS DESIGNED FOR DEEPER LEARNING IN HIGHER EDUCATIONThursday, August 21, 2014Source(s) NGLC Insights, Next Generation Learning Challenges (NGLC)Type Articles, Briefs, Papers, and ReportsAbstract

Seven insitutions received $1.7 million from Next Generation Learning Challenges (NGLC) Building Blocks for College Completion grant program to scale innovations designed to promote deeper learning and student engagement in higher education to other institutions. The group reached nearly 10,000 students at 135 institutions during the grant term. The grant recipients adopted different technology-enabled educational innovations to help students achieve deeper learning, including supplementing existing courses, supporting the adoption of blended learning, and completely redesigning a course (the most successful approach). This report analyzes the projects through the lens of the Hewlett Foundation's definition of deeper learning.  

Results suggest that students need support to transition to the more active role that deeper learning demands and that faculty need support, training, and time to create, implement, and sustain reforms that change student learning.Furthermore, fundamental, comprehensive redesign occurring over more than one academic term appears to promise the best outcomes for deeper learning.

Author: Andrea Venezia, Associate Director, Institute for Higher Education Leadership & Policy, California State University, Sacramento

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Conference | NAAEE

Conference | NAAEE | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it

working in partnership with

The Basics

The 2014 NAAEE conference will be held in Ottawa, Canada's vibrant capital city, with the Gold LEED Ottawa Convention Center as the center of activity. Join more than 1,000 of your environmental education colleagues for this outstanding professional development opportunity


 

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Transferability of Postsecondary Credit Following Student Transfer or Coenrollment

Find information about and locate all publications and data products on education information from the National Center for Education Statistics--NCES--. In most cases you may also browse the content of publications or download data files.

 

http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2014/2014163.pdf full report

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Does not appear to account for dual enrollment credits posted, with no choice, to a 2 year institution and has to be then transferred and accepted by a four year institution.  May skew 2yr to 4yr numbers higher.

 

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4 ways games make it ‘OK to play’ | eSchool News | eSchool News

4 ways games make it ‘OK to play’ | eSchool News | eSchool News | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
How can games make it OK to play in today's classrooms? Here are four ways games impact classroom learning.
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Would be concerned at characterizing game oriented learning strategies are self-directed. They can be but teaming is important also.

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Solar Power to go

Solar Power to go | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Solar power to go! Concentrated solar energy converts CO2 and H2O into solar-powered fuel More energy from our sun hits the Earth in one hour than is consumed on the planet in a whole year! But, the burning question is--how can we put all that sunshine to work making usable fuel? With support from the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Office of Emerging Frontiers in Research and Innovation, California Institute of Technology (Caltech) chemical engineer Sossina Haile and University of Minnesota mechanical engineer Jane Davidson are working to expand the nation's renewable energy storage capacity. Their mission is to put the heat of the sun to work creating renewable fuels from sources that don't need to be drilled out of the ground. The researchers are collecting sunlight to drive chemical reactions that break apart water and carbon dioxide molecules in order to make alternative fuels, such as hydrogen fuel. Solar-powered fuels, or "sun gas," would power the vehicles we drive today, as well as airplanes. In this case, the sky really is the limit! The research in this episode was supported by NSF award #1038307, EFRI-RESTOR: Thermochemical Routes to Efficient and Rapid Production of Solar Fuels. Miles O'Brien, Science Nation Correspondent Marsha Walton, Science Nation Producer
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Meet Microsoft's Sharks Cove: A Raspberry Pi-style mini-PC running Windows 8.1

Meet Microsoft's Sharks Cove: A Raspberry Pi-style mini-PC running Windows 8.1 | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Microsoft has announced its own Raspberry Pi look-alike, but don't expect a cheap price for this Windows flavored tiny PC.
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Kids coding app Tynker expands to Android and adds game-making mode

Kids coding app Tynker expands to Android and adds game-making mode | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Startup says it wants to work with schools and parents alike to help children learn programming skills. By Stuart Dredge
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Before the Robots

Before the Robots | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Five things to consider before implementing robots in your classrooms. GUEST COLUMN | by Andrew Grefig Providing students access to quality technology is often at the heart of many decisions distri...
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Thoughtful.  Importance of setting goals with planning and supports are so important.

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Robots invade classrooms: S$2.8m initiative rolled out to excite students about coding - Channel NewsAsia

Robots invade classrooms: S$2.8m initiative rolled out to excite students about coding - Channel NewsAsia | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Robotics & Maker Academy collaboration between the Infocomm Development Authority (IDA) of Singapore and Singapore Polytechnic (SP) will be rolled out to 30 schools over three years.
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Smart America

Smart America | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
In December of 2013 the SmartAmerica Challenge was launched to bring Industry, Academia and the Government to show how Cyber-Physical Systems (the Internet of Things) can create jobs, new business opportunities and socio-economic benefits to America. On June 11, 2014, 24 teams with over 100 organizations came together at the Washington DC Convention Center for a demonstration. The event was a huge success with keynote remarks by senior government leaders including U.S. Chief Technology Officer Todd Park and General Services Administrator Dan Tangherlini, as well as live demonstrations by 24 SmartAmerica technical teams. The projects showcased ways that the Internet of Things can improve transportation, emergency services, health care, security, energy conservation, and manufacturing. See Expo for the list of speakers and their presentations and News for media coverage. Visit the Challenges for details on the projects.
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New breakthrough could lead to huge battery improvements

New breakthrough could lead to huge battery improvements | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it

A research team at the University of Alberta may have made a breakthrough that ultimately leads to dramatic improvements in the batteries that power everything from laptops and smartphones to medical devices and tools. According to lead researcher Xinwei Cui, the lithium-ion battery technology his team is currently developing charges faster, lasts longer and outputs more power than current lithium-ion batteries.


“What we’ve done is develop a new electrochemistry technology that can provide high energy density and high power density for the next generation,” Cui told Beacon Newsin a recent interview. He continued, “We tried lots of different materials. Normally carbon is used as the anode in lithium-ion batteries, but we used carbon as the cathode, and this is used to build a battery with induced fluorination.”

The scientist explained in a recently published paper that carbon cathodes are inexpensive and safe to use, and the energy output of Cui’s team’s batteries is between five and eight times higher than lithium-ion batteries currently on the market. The tech is also delivering better results than several other next-generation battery technologies currently in development, as Beacon News noted.

“Nobody knew that carbon could be used as a cathode with such a high performance. That is what’s unique with our technology and what is detailed in our paper,” Cui said.

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Imagine Cup Day at MOHAI 2014 | Microsoft Imagine Cup

Imagine Cup Day at MOHAI 2014 | Microsoft Imagine Cup | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Microsoft Imagine Cup

 

Imagine Cup Day at MOHAIWHEN?Saturday, August 2, 2014 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.WHERE?860 Terry Avenue N, Seattle, WA 98109Admission is free and open to the publicMeet the Future. Bring the Family.Check out new technology projects made by students from over 30 countriesMeet the students, play the games, try the techTake a spin in the Lotus F1 Simulator, sponsored by AvanadeHands-on Mad Science activities for kidsFree family concerts by the D20 Brass Band and the School of RockIncredible hip hop dancing by the Massive MonkeesMeet Blitz, the Seattle Seahawks mascotFree admission to MOHAI, the Museum of History and Industry, all dayFree snacks!Avanade is a presenting sponsor of Imagine Cup Day at MOHAI

Bring your extra school supplies to help Seattle students in need! We're partnering with the Boys & Girls Clubs of King County to collect your donations of school supplies so students are ready for the new school year.

Highlighting innovation and education, MOHAI collects and preserves the diverse history of Seattle and Puget Sound in an effort to inspire people to create a better future for themselves and their communities. Their mission is to spark the innovator in all of us!

On Saturday, August 2, MOHAI and Microsoft will host Imagine Cup Day when the museum will open its doors to the public for free and the Imagine Cup world finalists will showcase their projects as part of a special one-day only event. Residents of Seattle are invited to meet our students and see their projects in action.

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How Would You Design a Bicycle?

How Would You Design a Bicycle? | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Learning to ride a bicycle is a strong memory from many of our childhoods. How did you learn how to ride a bicycle? What would you change about how today's bicycles are designed?
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Reel Grrls

Reel Grrls | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it

WHAT IS REEL GRRLS?
Reel Grrls is an award-winning non-profit media arts and leadership training program for girls ages 9 – 19. Reel Grrls envisions a world in which women and girls have leadership roles in creating media and are represented behind and in front of the camera. Learn more >

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Re-Programming Mobility: Trends & Signals Report

Dr. Gordon Dahlby's insight:

The kind of problems our students should be tackling. 

 

Age of >1:1 autos to drivers is about to wane as ownership is questioned by these next generations. Combine autonomous with on-demand.. and ultra high speed rail.

 

Adoption would increase if human steered transport stayed in the 'slow' lanes. :>)

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Critical Thinking Pathways

Critical Thinking Pathways | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
To teach critical thinking, consider applying six definitions of that discipline to the practices of authentic inquiry, PBL, and integrated studies.
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Crowd-Funding, Student Petitions Bring Computer Science Classes to California Districts

Crowd-Funding, Student Petitions Bring Computer Science Classes to California Districts | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Next school year, four high schools in California will debut Advanced Placement Computer Science classes, thanks to student petitions and crowd-funding campaigns supportive of those efforts.
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What light can teach us about the universe - Pete Edwards - YouTube

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/what-light-can-teach-us-about-the-universe-pete-edwards Humanity has long been looking at the universe and asking...
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Problem Solving Skills of 15-year-olds: Results from PISA 2012

Find information about and locate all publications and data products on education information from the National Center for Education Statistics--NCES--. In most cases you may also browse the content of publications or download data files.
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Mapping the Spread of Drought Across the U.S.

Mapping the Spread of Drought Across the U.S. | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Maps and charts updated weekly show the latest extent of the drought in the United States.
Dr. Gordon Dahlby's insight:
Communicating is important skill
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France to offer programming in elementary school

France to offer programming in elementary school | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Beginning this fall, French primary school students will have the option of learning computer science

 

The French are known for lots of things, such as their love of good food, fine wine and great art. It appears now that, if the government has its way, the French will soon also be known for something else: their computer programming prowess.

 

France’s Minister of National Education, Benoît Hamon, said in a recent interview with Le Journal du Dimanche that programming courses will be offered to primary school students starting this fall. The courses, which will be optional and offered during extracurricular time, will teach students programming basics and how to create simple applications. Hamon also expressed a desire that programming be offered at the secondary school level. The goal, he said, is to give French students the keys to thrive in a connected world and to encourage them go into technical vocations.

Some questions as to how this will work remain to be answered. For example, who will teach the courses? Hamon suggested that some, like math teachers, will be more naturally inclined than others. He also said that 9,000 French schools that currently do not have broadband access will have it by September. Also, Hamon gave no specifics about the actual curriculum, like what languages would be taught.

France is just the latest in a line of countries that are encouraging or even requiring that students as young as those in elementary school learn programming. Here are some examples of other countries that have already implemented or will soon implement such programs.

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Interview with Arun Gupta on Devoxx4Kids | Opensource.com

Interview with Arun Gupta on Devoxx4Kids | Opensource.com | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Learn more about an international organization which helps introduce school kids to programming, robotics and engineering in a fun way
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Change the Equation

Change the Equation | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
STEMworks Welcome to the the STEMworks application website, a portal for STEM learning programs that are interested in applying to Change the Equation's STEMworks database of effective STEM learning programs. STEMworks is a leading resource for businesses that are looking for proven programs that meet their philanthropic priorities. It houses an expanding number of STEM learning programs that have met CTEq's rigorous Design Principles and Rubric for Effective STEM Philanthropy. Business leaders, other funders, and STEM advocates search STEMworks for programs that are most likely to help them maximize the impact of their investments. STEMworks is accepting new applications from July 14 through September 12! For more information about the application process, visit the How it Works page. STEMworks was created in collaboration with WestEd, an independent, nonprofit research, development, and service organization.
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Brainstorm Tech panel: Education is the real way to get more women into tech

Brainstorm Tech panel: Education is the real way to get more women into tech | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Harvey Mudd's Maria Klawe, Hearsay Social CEO Clara Shih, and Cisco CEO John Chambers spoke with Time Inc CTO Colin Bodell at Fortune's Brainstorm Tech conference.
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New Tech Network (NTN) to become an independent non-profit organization

KnowledgeWorks Announces New Partnership in New Tech Network to Expand Innovative Learning and Student Achievement 

Napa, Ca July 1, 2014– The KnowledgeWorks Foundation announced today it will spinout California-based New Tech Network (NTN) to become an independent non-profit organization, in order to advance NTN to the next stage of the innovative school network’s growth.

The spinout is being led by long time NTN supporter and KnowledgeWorks board member Barry Schuler. The Schuler Family Fund has agreed to seed an initial $10 million grant and KnowledgeWorks is committing an additional $1.5 million. Schuler is spearheading additional development and matching efforts. The new financial support for NTN will fund
ongoing operations and new program initiatives.

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