STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming
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'Dull' computer classes beefed up

'Dull' computer classes beefed up | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
The current information and communications technology (ICT) curriculum in England's schools is a "mess" and must be radically revamped, the education secretary has announced.
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STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming
STEM (Science Technology Education & Mathematics) K-20  education models and innovations
Curated by Gordon Dahlby
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The Best of Cassini—13 Years in Orbit Around Saturn

The Best of Cassini—13 Years in Orbit Around Saturn | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
This September, NASA’s Cassini spacecraft will take its final measurements and images as it plunges into Saturn’s atmosphere at 77,000 miles per hour, burning up high above the cloud tops.

Via Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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From the New Issue of Make: Our 8 Standout Dev Boards | Make:

From the New Issue of Make: Our 8 Standout Dev Boards | Make: | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
These eight boards stand out for their advanced specs, built-in offerings, and, in some cases, their innovative interface options.
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Engineering highly adaptable robots requires new tools for new rules

Engineering highly adaptable robots requires new tools for new rules | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Northwestern University mechanical engineering professor Todd Murphey and his team are engineering robots that one might say could make robotic assistance as seamless as "humanly" possible. With support from the National Science Foundation (NSF), the team is using novel algorithmic tools, such as a drawing robot, to develop the algorithms, or rules of behavior, that would greatly enhance a robot's ability to adapt to human unpredictability.

Murphey points out that in order for robots to help people, they have to have at least a basic understanding of the types of tasks people can do. Some tasks, like lifting and placing an object, are close to the types of tasks that robots already do. Other tasks, like drawing, are harder for robots, partly because there are so many ways to get the same image. As Murphey explains: "And so, drawing is a type of task that's maybe not the same as that sort of precision manufacturing task that we've seen robots do historically."
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Learning Studios - Digital Promise Global

Learning Studios - Digital Promise Global | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
A Learning Studio is a place where learners define the problems they want to solve and design solutions to address them. Leveraging powerful technology, students engage in activities and projects that expose them to skills and concepts such as design thinking, three dimensional design, and social entrepreneurship.
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Typetoteach's curator insight, May 10, 4:11 AM
Let the learners take control of what and how they learn...create a sense of ownership and encourage creative development.
Jess Rodgers's comment, May 31, 10:20 PM
This is a great video Tina. It has so many great ideas for redefining task in the classroom to engage critical thinking for students of all ages. I love the superhero idea for young students completing a sustainability project- it arguably adds value to content for kids. Definite evidence of student-centered learning. Thanks for the scoop Tina.
Jeff At CQU's curator insight, June 15, 11:58 PM

This is an interesting article with a video regarding learning studios.

 

"A Learning Studio is a place where learners define the problems they want to solve and design solutions to address them."

Source: http://global.digitalpromise.org/learning-studios/

 

Although the concept and implantation is quite new, with only 60 schools utilising this concept throughout the world at the time of writing, the potential is huge and system may well increase drastically in time.

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Stereotypes about “Brilliance” Affect Girls’ Interests as Early as Age 6, New Study Finds

Stereotypes about “Brilliance” Affect Girls’ Interests as Early as Age 6, New Study Finds | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
By the age of 6, girls become less likely than boys to associate brilliance with their own gender and are more likely to avoid activities said to require brilliance, shows a new study conducted by researchers at New York University, the University of Illinois, and Princeton University.
The findings appear in the journal Science.
The research, led by Lin Bian, a doctoral student at the University of Illinois, and NYU psychology professor Andrei Cimpian, demonstrates how early gender stereotypes take hold and points to the potential of their life-long impact. Sarah-Jane Leslie, professor of philosophy at Princeton University, also contributed to the research.
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The K12 Engineering Education Podcast

The K12 Engineering Education Podcast | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it

This is the podcast for all the educators, engineers, entrepreneurs, and parents out there who are interested in getting kids into engineering at younger ages. Listen to real conversations among various professionals in the engineering education space, as we try to find better ways to educate and inspire kids in engineering thinking. .

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Irreverent Learning

Irreverent Learning | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it

There are dozens of resources available to tell you about makerspace. How to create one, how to implement one, etc. Articles about libraries as the hub for a school's makerspace; articles telling you what you need to set up and what kinds of projects you might do; and many, many, many books to read to better understand and implement a makerspace.

I was thinking about makerspace today as I was watching a couple of kindergarten students build a fantastic structure with wooden blocks. And then I was watching some kids make drawings influenced by a rather heated conversation about emojis. And later I watched some kids figure out how to create their own manipulatives so they could better understand a particular way of solving a particular kind of math problem.

Makers. Making. And just randomly in a classroom.

I agree that some resources for some kinds of makerspace activities require storage and often an electrical outlet so those tools also require rules. And I agree that having a space or resources for kids to use for specific kinds of tasks or problems, or for extension activities, or for supplemental work when they've finished their other work might require a separate space if only to reduce distraction for other kids and for storage.

But I've also seen what kids can do with some craft sticks and Play-Doh®. Toss in some markers, a few sheets of construction paper, some chenille sticks, and random other stuff and who knows what they'll make? Give them access to a tablet or laptop with the ability to record something and stand back.

Then they'll be asking for other stuff when they say "It would be cool if we had something that let us. . . " because they might know exactly what they want but they have an image in their heads for what they want to create, to make.

So when schools and teachers talking about setting aside space so they can have a single place for making, I assume that's mostly for quality and damage control because making can be messy.

If you're waiting for a budget or a special room for a makerspace, stop waiting. Get some craft sticks, duct tape in different sizes and colors, chenille sticks, styrofoam shapes, and whatever else. Mismatched buttons, leftover pieces of cardboard, small nuts and bolts that don't seem to have a home, leftover wire, glue sticks, yarn or string. All kinds of stuff you can pick up while walking through Michael's, Hobby Lobby, your garage, and elsewhere. If you want to be organized, but each of them in their own bins or baskets. Or just make the stuff available on a table or on a shelf in your classroom.

....read more

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Jumpstart Projects with Cayenne - myDevices Cayenne

Jumpstart Projects with Cayenne - myDevices Cayenne | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Jumpstart Raspberry Pi & Arduino Projects with Cayenne
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Communicators Tours Driverless Car Test Site

The Communicators tours the Mobility Transformation Center at the University of Michigan to see how this test site can help car companies develop wireless…
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Lessons Learned from the 2016 AP Chemistry Exam

Lessons Learned from the 2016 AP Chemistry Exam | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Lessons Learned from the 2016 AP Chemistry Exam

Tue, Oct 4, 2016 6:00 PM - 7:00 PM CDT
Show in My Time Zone
This presentation will outline the process involved in the creation and refinement of the AP Chemistry Exam, and it will discuss the elaborate measures taken to ensure the consistent, fair, and accurate grading of the free-response section. The presentation will then review in detail all the free-response questions from the 2016 AP Chemistry Exam and highlight the most common…Read more
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K12 Engineering Postcast #STEM

Promoting education in engineering and design for all ages. Produced by Pius Wong, engineer.

This podcast is for educators, engineers, entrepreneurs, and parents interested in bringing engineering to younger ages. Listen to real conversations among various professionals in the engineering education space, as we try to find better ways to educate and inspire kids in engineering thinking.

Topics to cover are intended to be wide-ranging. They include overcoming institutional barriers to engineering in K12, cool ways to teach engineering, equity in access to engineering, industry needs for engineers, strategies for training teachers, "edtech" solutions for K12 classrooms, curriculum and pedagogy reviews, and research on how kids learn engineering knowledge and skills. Thanks for listening!
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Preparing Students for a Project-Based World

Preparing Students for a Project-Based World | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it

Authored by Bonnie Lathram, Bob Lenz and Tom Vander Ark


In the paper, Preparing Students for a Project-Based World, released jointly by Getting Smart and Buck Institute for Education (BIE), we explore equity, economic realities, student engagement and instructional and school design in the preparation of all students for college, career and citizenship.

The new economic realities are illustrated by Robin Chase, founder of Zipcar: “My father had one job in his life. I’ve had six in mine, my kids will have six at the same time.”

Throughout the paper, authors Bonnie Lathram, Bob Lenz and Tom Vander Ark describe how the new economy and growing inequities are impacting students and schools, and what we need to be doing to better prepare students for a project-based world.

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The Power of Curiosity

The Power of Curiosity | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Research shows when people are curious about something, not only do they learn better, they learn more. It should come as no surprise, then, that inquiry-based learning is proving to be an effective education model. Inquiry-based learning occurs when students discover and construct information with the teacher’s guidance. It is a learner-centered model that arouses students’ curiosity and motivates them to seek their own answers. Increasingly, technology is the foundation of an effective inquiry-based lesson. Download this Center for Digital Education paper to learn more about inquiry-based learning and how you can support this model in your classrooms. The paper also offers sample lesson plans that draw upon inquiry-based strategies with the integration of technology.
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Sciences to become hands-on in move away from rote learning - Independent.ie

Sciences to become hands-on in move away from rote learning - Independent.ie | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Practical exams in Leaving Certificate science subjects are finally on the horizon.
Government curriculum advisers have recommended 90-minute laboratory-based practicals in biology, chemistry and physics, to be worth 30pc of the marks for those subjects.
An overhaul in Leaving Cert science subjects is part of wider moves to ensure school-leavers and graduates in Ireland are equipped with necessary skills for the modern age.

It is almost 11 years since the National Council for Curriculum and Assessment (NCCA) started work on a shake-up of the science curricula and, in 2014, it sent its final recommendations to the Department of Education.
Now, in a sign the department is ready to go ahead with the changes, it recently asked the State Examinations Commission (SEC) to conduct school trials in the practicals to assess the feasibility of introducing them into the assessment regime.

The practicals would allow students to demonstrate what they know in a real-life way, rather than relying solely on written exams, for which many depend on rote learning.
The overall changes proposed for the three Leaving Cert subjects, both in terms of a new syllabus and the practicals, allow for continuity with the more inquiry-based focus on teaching and learning now being implemented in science at junior cycle.  

Read more: Forget cramming, get a good night's sleep instead to ace exams
The new specifications for science subjects, at both Junior Cert and Leaving Cert, put an emphasis on the application of knowledge in real-world contexts. In other words, students should be able "to do" rather than only "to know".

The junior cycle changes in science were introduced for first years last September, as part of the ongoing reforms, and the first students to experience these will complete junior cycle in 2019.
Sixth-year students in 30 schools will participate in the trials for the practicals in October, before a final decision on their inclusion into the assessment regime.

The SEC is due to deliver a report on the trials to the department by February and, even if there is no further delay, it is likely to be 2021 at the earliest before the first practicals take place, as the new syllabus would be introduced for fifth years.
That time scale would allow for the first cohort of students to have experienced the junior cycle reforms to progress to similarly modernised syllabuses for physics, chemistry and biology at Leaving Cert level.

The practicals proposed for the Leaving Cert would be assessed by external examiners, not the students' own teachers, so avoiding the sort of dispute that has arisen around some of the junior cycle reforms.
The changes are regarded as long overdue and received a broad welcome in an extensive consultation process that the NCCA conducted as part of its deliberations.

Recent reports from the chief examiner about the performance of candidates in Leaving Cert science exams have drawn attention to their shortcomings.
Reflecting on the 2013 chemistry exam, the chief examiner stated "the ability of candidates to perform experiments safely and co-operatively, select and manipulate suitable apparatus and make accurate observations and measurements cannot be determined in a written paper."

Concern about the present sole reliance on written exams in the science subjects also emerged during the NCCA consultation on changes, where it found "much criticism of the expectation on learners to learn material off by heart", arising from its consultations about the changes.
Irish Independent
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Wouldn't that be interesting in the US?
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ED-Funded VR Game Simulates Chemistry Lab Experiences -- THE Journal

ED-Funded VR Game Simulates Chemistry Lab Experiences -- THE Journal | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Schell Games, a full-service game design and development company based in Pittsburgh, recently released a video trailer for its upcoming educational virtual reality (VR) game that seeks to better engage high school students in chemistry concepts.
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Coding for What? - DML Central

Coding for What? - DML Central | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Ben Williamson argues that if kids need to learn to code, it should be for digital citizenship, not to become complicit with computational propaganda.
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Think and discuss
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Harnessing wave energy to light up coastal communities -- Science Nation | NSF - National Science Foundation

There's a new renewable energy player in town and it's about to make waves in the industry. Despite its massive potential as a source for renewable energy, the ocean is unlikely to contribute meaningfully to electricity supplies without dramatic, innovation-driven reductions in the cost of energy conversion. That's where engineers Balky Nair, Rahul Shendure and Tim Mundon come in with their company, Oscilla Power. With support from the National Science Foundation (NSF), they're developing a utility-scale wave energy harvester called the Triton. It's a sturdy system with few moving parts -- rugged enough to stand up to harsh seas with little need for maintenance. This technology shows promise as a means for delivering utility-scale electric power to the grid at a price that is competitive with conventional fossil or renewable technologies. The team plans more tests with increasingly larger and more sophisticated prototypes. At full scale, each Triton system will be 30 yards wide and will power more than 650 homes. Original air date: February 8, 2016
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Code for the Future.com

About Us
Code To The Future is the Leader for Computer Science Immersion. Having been highlighted by the White House for helping start America’s first elementary Computer Science Magnet Schools, Code To The Future provides the premier Solution for Districts and Families.
Our Mission is to inspire students to become aware of their incredible potential, and equip them with the skills necessary for success in school and life.

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The culture of engineering does not take women seriously

The culture of engineering does not take women seriously | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Isolation and ‘blatant sexual harassment’ among the issues reported by female engineering scholars, writes Brian Rubineau

Via Sylvia Martinez
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The Perfect Storm for Maker Education

The Perfect Storm for Maker Education | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Originally published at http://blog.iat.com/2015/09/30/a-perfect-storm-for-maker-education/ Perfect Storm: an expression that describes an event where a rare combination of circumstances will aggravate a situation drastically.  The term This term is also used to describe an actual phenomenon that happens to occur in such a confluence, resulting in an event of unusual magnitude. Maker Movement: The maker movement,…
Gordon Dahlby's insight:
I put "Maker Ed" under STEM not to exclude other areas of making, like music and art, but as design processes within sciences and engineering.
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Engineer GirlEssay Contest - Engineering and Animals

Engineer GirlEssay Contest - Engineering and Animals | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Engineers affect everything about the way people live, so it is not surprising that they also have a big impact on the animal world. Environmental engineers, for example, are often tasked with evaluating projects in order to minimize negative effects on valuable animal species. In some cases, engineers have developed ingenious solutions to help animals and people share the planet. 

The International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) maintains a list, known as the IUCN Red List, which ranks the conservation status of thousands of species. For your essay, choose an animal that is ranked by IUCN as either: vulnerable, endangered, or critically endangered. Learn about the animal and consider how engineering might improve life for that species. To prepare your essay consider the following questions: 

Why did you choose this species, and what problem or problems does it face? 
What ideas have already been tested that may help to design a solution and begin solving those problems? 
What specific solution would you suggest to help solve the problems faced by this species? 
Aside from the animals, who would benefit from your proposed solution? 
Are there any policies or standards currently in place that would affect the way your solution could be implemented? 
Who would have to be involved in implementing the proposed solution? 
Who should fund the proposed solution?
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Search AP Credit Policies

Find colleges and universities that offer credit or placement for AP scores. Begin your search by entering the name of the institution below. For the most up-to-date AP credit policy information, be sure to check the institution's website.
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National Chemistry Week (NCW) - American Chemical Society 10.16-22

National Chemistry Week (NCW) - American Chemical Society 10.16-22 | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
NCW encourages chemists and chemistry enthusiasts to build awareness of chemistry at the local level. Local Sections, businesses, schools, and individuals are invited to organize or participate in events in their communities with a common goal: to promote the value of chemistry in everyday life.

The NCW 2016 theme is "Solving Mysteries Through Chemistry", focusing on the chemistry of forensics and more.
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STEM 2026
A Vision for Innovation in STEM Education- US Dept of Education via AIR

Executive Summary

Building on the priority to support science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM1 ) education set by the Obama Administration that is reflected in several of the Administration’s initiatives,2 the U.S. Department of Education (the Department) is releasing a report outlining a vision to carry on that legacy in the coming decade. This vision was informed by the key observations, considerations, and recommendations put forth by a varying range of STEM education thought leaders and experts from the field during a series of 1.5-day workshops convened by the Department in collaboration with American Institutes for Research (AIR). This report is a resource that provides examples, not endorsements, of resources that may be helpful in reaching the STEM 2026 vision as outlined by the field experts. 

The complexities of today’s world require all people to be equipped with a new set of core knowledge and skills to solve difficult problems, gather and evaluate evidence, and make sense of information they receive from varied print and, increasingly, digital media. The learning and doing of STEM helps develop these skills and prepare students for a workforce where success results not just from what one knows, but what one is able to do with that knowledge.3 Thus, a strong STEM education is becoming increasingly recognized as a key driver of opportunity, and data show the need for STEM knowledge and skills will grow and continue into the future. Those graduates who have practical and relevant STEM precepts embedded into their educational experiences will be in high demand in all job sectors. It is estimated that in the next five years, major American companies will need to add nearly 1.6 million STEM-skilled employees (Business Roundtable & Change the Equation, 2014). Labor market data also show that the set of core cognitive knowledge, skills, and abilities that are associated with a STEM education are now in demand not only in traditional STEM occupations, but in nearly all job sectors and types of positions (Carnevale, Smith, & Melton, 2011; Rothwell, 2013). 

The nation has persistent inequities in access, participation, and success in STEM subjects that exist along racial, socioeconomic, gender, and geographic lines, as well as among students with disabilities. STEM education disparities threaten the nation’s ability to close education and poverty gaps, meet the demands of a technology-driven economy, ensure national security, and maintain preeminence in scientific research and technological innovation.

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Is the maker movement putting librarians at risk?

Is the maker movement putting librarians at risk? | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Librarians in the Shawnee Mission School District are making way for “the maker movement,” and some worry where that story is going.

Reading stories, of course, has been a big part of what Jan Bombeck does with children. “Stories, stories and more stories,” she told the school board last month.

The Ray Marsh Elementary School directory lists Bombeck as “librarian” because she is state-certified to be one. But at least four Shawnee Mission grade schools have hired “innovation specialists” to run their libraries when fall classes open.

That’s the language of the maker movement, which seeks to convert once-quiet school spaces — usually in the libraries — into hands-on laboratories of creation and computer-assisted innovation.
Gordon Dahlby's insight:
In fact, the word “librarian” didn’t come up in the job description for an innovation specialist at Merriam Park Elementary. “Stories” wasn’t there, either. 

 No mention of “books,” “literature” nor “shelves.”
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