STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming
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US NSF - Multimedia Gallery - Lisa-Joy Zgorski and student Helen Hastings interview "Watson" creator David Ferrucci.

US NSF - Multimedia Gallery - Lisa-Joy Zgorski and student Helen Hastings interview "Watson" creator David Ferrucci. | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it

Lisa-Joy Zgorski of NSF and Helen Hastings, a senior at Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology in Alexandria, VA interviewed David Ferrucci, an IBM Fellow and the Principle Investigator for the Watson/Jeopardy! during his March 8th, 2012 visit to NSF...

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STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming
STEM (Science Technology Education & Mathematics) K-20  education models and innovations
Curated by Gordon Dahlby
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The culture of engineering does not take women seriously

The culture of engineering does not take women seriously | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Isolation and ‘blatant sexual harassment’ among the issues reported by female engineering scholars, writes Brian Rubineau

Via sylvia martinez
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The Perfect Storm for Maker Education

The Perfect Storm for Maker Education | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Originally published at http://blog.iat.com/2015/09/30/a-perfect-storm-for-maker-education/ Perfect Storm: an expression that describes an event where a rare combination of circumstances will aggravate a situation drastically.  The term This term is also used to describe an actual phenomenon that happens to occur in such a confluence, resulting in an event of unusual magnitude. Maker Movement: The maker movement,…
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I put "Maker Ed" under STEM not to exclude other areas of making, like music and art, but as design processes within sciences and engineering.
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Engineer GirlEssay Contest - Engineering and Animals

Engineer GirlEssay Contest - Engineering and Animals | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Engineers affect everything about the way people live, so it is not surprising that they also have a big impact on the animal world. Environmental engineers, for example, are often tasked with evaluating projects in order to minimize negative effects on valuable animal species. In some cases, engineers have developed ingenious solutions to help animals and people share the planet. 

The International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) maintains a list, known as the IUCN Red List, which ranks the conservation status of thousands of species. For your essay, choose an animal that is ranked by IUCN as either: vulnerable, endangered, or critically endangered. Learn about the animal and consider how engineering might improve life for that species. To prepare your essay consider the following questions: 

Why did you choose this species, and what problem or problems does it face? 
What ideas have already been tested that may help to design a solution and begin solving those problems? 
What specific solution would you suggest to help solve the problems faced by this species? 
Aside from the animals, who would benefit from your proposed solution? 
Are there any policies or standards currently in place that would affect the way your solution could be implemented? 
Who would have to be involved in implementing the proposed solution? 
Who should fund the proposed solution?
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Search AP Credit Policies

Find colleges and universities that offer credit or placement for AP scores. Begin your search by entering the name of the institution below. For the most up-to-date AP credit policy information, be sure to check the institution's website.
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National Chemistry Week (NCW) - American Chemical Society 10.16-22

National Chemistry Week (NCW) - American Chemical Society 10.16-22 | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
NCW encourages chemists and chemistry enthusiasts to build awareness of chemistry at the local level. Local Sections, businesses, schools, and individuals are invited to organize or participate in events in their communities with a common goal: to promote the value of chemistry in everyday life.

The NCW 2016 theme is "Solving Mysteries Through Chemistry", focusing on the chemistry of forensics and more.
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STEM 2026
A Vision for Innovation in STEM Education- US Dept of Education via AIR

Executive Summary

Building on the priority to support science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM1 ) education set by the Obama Administration that is reflected in several of the Administration’s initiatives,2 the U.S. Department of Education (the Department) is releasing a report outlining a vision to carry on that legacy in the coming decade. This vision was informed by the key observations, considerations, and recommendations put forth by a varying range of STEM education thought leaders and experts from the field during a series of 1.5-day workshops convened by the Department in collaboration with American Institutes for Research (AIR). This report is a resource that provides examples, not endorsements, of resources that may be helpful in reaching the STEM 2026 vision as outlined by the field experts. 

The complexities of today’s world require all people to be equipped with a new set of core knowledge and skills to solve difficult problems, gather and evaluate evidence, and make sense of information they receive from varied print and, increasingly, digital media. The learning and doing of STEM helps develop these skills and prepare students for a workforce where success results not just from what one knows, but what one is able to do with that knowledge.3 Thus, a strong STEM education is becoming increasingly recognized as a key driver of opportunity, and data show the need for STEM knowledge and skills will grow and continue into the future. Those graduates who have practical and relevant STEM precepts embedded into their educational experiences will be in high demand in all job sectors. It is estimated that in the next five years, major American companies will need to add nearly 1.6 million STEM-skilled employees (Business Roundtable & Change the Equation, 2014). Labor market data also show that the set of core cognitive knowledge, skills, and abilities that are associated with a STEM education are now in demand not only in traditional STEM occupations, but in nearly all job sectors and types of positions (Carnevale, Smith, & Melton, 2011; Rothwell, 2013). 

The nation has persistent inequities in access, participation, and success in STEM subjects that exist along racial, socioeconomic, gender, and geographic lines, as well as among students with disabilities. STEM education disparities threaten the nation’s ability to close education and poverty gaps, meet the demands of a technology-driven economy, ensure national security, and maintain preeminence in scientific research and technological innovation.

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Is the maker movement putting librarians at risk?

Is the maker movement putting librarians at risk? | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Librarians in the Shawnee Mission School District are making way for “the maker movement,” and some worry where that story is going.

Reading stories, of course, has been a big part of what Jan Bombeck does with children. “Stories, stories and more stories,” she told the school board last month.

The Ray Marsh Elementary School directory lists Bombeck as “librarian” because she is state-certified to be one. But at least four Shawnee Mission grade schools have hired “innovation specialists” to run their libraries when fall classes open.

That’s the language of the maker movement, which seeks to convert once-quiet school spaces — usually in the libraries — into hands-on laboratories of creation and computer-assisted innovation.
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In fact, the word “librarian” didn’t come up in the job description for an innovation specialist at Merriam Park Elementary. “Stories” wasn’t there, either. 

 No mention of “books,” “literature” nor “shelves.”
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The Active Learning Continuum

The Active Learning Continuum | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Ninety-one percent of respondents to a recent CDE survey agreed active learning better prepares students for college and careers than traditional education frameworks. So why is it that it’s more common to see rows of desks facing the front of the room instead of workspaces designed for collaboration and exploration in today’s classrooms? Unfortunately, students can often lack the communication, critical-thinking and problem-solving skills they will need in their careers when they graduate. This paper helps school districts change that outcome. It discusses the benefits and challenges of active learning and offers real-life examples and strategies to help districts make their learning environments more engaging and collaborative.
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Can Schools Get Maker Education Right?

Can Schools Get Maker Education Right? | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
as districts rush to embrace the trend, some key observers are also worried.

Can schools, with their standards, state tests, and bell schedules, maintain the do-it-yourself, only-if-you-want-to ethos that fueled making's popularity in the first place?

"There's an amazing grassroots effort underway to bring the maker movement into education," said Dale Dougherty, the founder of MAKE magazine and godfather of the modern maker phenomenon. "But if schools don't get the spirit of it, I don't think it will benefit them a whole lot."

Undoubtedly, making is having a moment. Beginning June 17, the White House will host its second National Week of Making. The U.S. Department of Education is supporting efforts to rethink career and technical education through the creation of high school maker spaces. And nonprofit advocacy groups such as Digital Promise and Dougherty's Maker Education Initiative are encouraging districts to champion making inside their schools.

For all the excitement, though, there are also hurdles.
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National Week of Making

National Week of Making | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Makers are developing new solutions and products to pressing challenges, engaging students in hands on, interactive learning of STEM, arts and design and enabling individuals to learn new skills in design, fabrication and manufacturing. This site was created by Makers to support, encourage, promote, and highlight organizations from around the country who are working to create more opportunities for more people of all ages to make. This was inspired by President’s call to action to “lift up makers and builders and doers across the country.”
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Dancing with Robots

WHAT’S NEXT? 
Well before the Great Recession, middle class Americans questioned the ability of the public sector to adapt to the wrenching forces re-shaping society. And as we’ve begun to see a “new economic normal,” many Americans are left wondering if anyone or any institution can help them, making it imperative that both parties—but especially the self-identified party of government—re-think their 20th century orthodoxies. With this report Third Way is continuing NEXT—a series of in-depth commissioned research papers that look at the economic trends that will shape policy over the coming decades. In particular, we’re bringing this deeper, more provocative academic work to bear on what we see as the central domestic policy challenge of the 21st century: how to ensure American middle class prosperity and individual success in an era of everintensifying globalization and technological upheaval. It’s the defining question of our time, and one that as a country we’ve yet to answer. Each of the papers we commission over the next several years will take a deeper dive into one aspect of middle class prosperity—such as education, retirement, achievement, and the safety net. Our aim is to challenge, and ultimately change, some of the prevailing assumptions that routinely define, and often constrain, Democratic and progressive economic and social policy debates. And by doing that, we’ll be able to help push the conversation towards a new, more modern understanding of America’s middle class challenges—and spur fresh ideas for a new era. In Dancing with Robots, Frank Levy and Richard Murnane make a compelling case that the hollowing out of middle class jobs in America has as much to do with the technology revolution and computerization of tasks as with global pressures like China. In so doing, they predict what the future of work will be in America and what it will take for the middle class to succeed. The collapse of the once substantial middle class job picture has begun a robust debate among those who argue that it has its roots in policy versus those who argue that it has its roots in structural changes in the economy. Levy and Murnane delve deeply into structural economic changes brought about by technology. These two pioneers in the field (Murnane at Harvard’s Graduate School of Education and Levy at MIT) argue that “the human labor market will center on three kinds of work: solving unstructured problems, working with new information, and carrying out non-routine manual tasks.” The bulk of the rest of the work will be done by computers with some work reserved for low wage workers abroad. They argue that the future success of the middle class rests on the nation’s ability “to sharply increase the fraction of American children with the foundational skills needed to develop ...

http://content.thirdway.org/publications/714/Dancing-With-Robots.pdf
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Societal implications
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Under Pressure: New technique could make large, flexible solar panels more feasible — Eberly College of Science

Under Pressure: New technique could make large, flexible solar panels more feasible — Eberly College of Science | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
A new, high-pressure technique may allow the production of huge sheets of thin-film silicon semiconductors at low temperatures in simple reactors at a fraction of the size and cost of current technology. A paper describing the research by scientists at Penn State University appears May 13, 2016 in the journal Advanced Materials.
"We have developed a new, high-pressure, plasma-free approach to creating large-area, thin-film semiconductors," said John Badding, professor of chemistry, physics, and materials science and engineering at Penn State and the leader of the research team. "By putting the process under high pressure, our new technique could make it less expensive and easier to create the large, flexible semiconductors that are used in flat-panel monitors and solar cells and are the second most commercially important semiconductors."

Thin-film silicon semiconductors typically are made by the process of chemical vapor deposition, in which silane -- a gas composed of silicon and hydrogen -- undergoes a chemical reaction to deposit the silicon and hydrogen atoms in a thin layer to coat a surface. To create a functioning semiconductor, the chemical reaction that deposits the silicon onto the surface must happen at a low enough temperature so that the hydrogen atoms are incorporated into the coating rather than being driven off like steam from boiling water. With current technology, this low temperature is achieved by creating plasma -- a state of matter similar to a gas made up of ions and free electrons -- in a large volume of gas at low pressure. Massive and expensive reactors so large that they are difficult to ship by air are needed to generate the plasma and to accommodate the large volume of gas required.
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How Teens Benefit From Reading About the Struggles of Scientists

How Teens Benefit From Reading About the Struggles of Scientists | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
What kind of people can become scientists?  When a group of researchers posed that question to ninth- and 10th-graders, almost every student gave empowering responses, such as “People who work hard” or “Anyone who seems interested in the field of science.”

But despite these generalized beliefs, many of these same students struggled to imagine themselves as scientists, citing concerns such as “I’m not good at science” and “Even if I work hard, I will not do well.”

It’s understandable that students might find imagining themselves as scientists a stretch — great achievements in science get far more attention than the failed experiments, so it’s easy to see a scientist’s work as stemming from an innate talent. Additionally, several science fields have a long way to go to be more inclusive of women and underrepresented minorities.  

But for high school students, learning more about some of the personal and intellectual struggles of scientists can help students feel more motivated to learn science. Researchers at Teachers College, Columbia University and the University of Washington designed an intervention to “confront students’ beliefs that scientific achievement reflects ability rather than effort by exposing students to stories of how accomplished scientists struggled and overcame challenges in their scientific endeavors.”

During the study, the students read one of three types of stories about Albert Einstein, Marie Curie and Michael Faraday:

Intellectual struggle stories: stories about how scientists “struggled intellectually,” such as making mistakes while tackling a scientific problem and learning from these setbacks.
Life struggle stories: stories about how scientists struggled in their personal lives, such as persevering in the face of poverty or lack of family support.
Achievement stories: stories about how scientists made great discoveries, without any discussion of concurrent challenges.
Researchers found that students who heard
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Irreverent Learning

Irreverent Learning | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it

There are dozens of resources available to tell you about makerspace. How to create one, how to implement one, etc. Articles about libraries as the hub for a school's makerspace; articles telling you what you need to set up and what kinds of projects you might do; and many, many, many books to read to better understand and implement a makerspace.

I was thinking about makerspace today as I was watching a couple of kindergarten students build a fantastic structure with wooden blocks. And then I was watching some kids make drawings influenced by a rather heated conversation about emojis. And later I watched some kids figure out how to create their own manipulatives so they could better understand a particular way of solving a particular kind of math problem.

Makers. Making. And just randomly in a classroom.

I agree that some resources for some kinds of makerspace activities require storage and often an electrical outlet so those tools also require rules. And I agree that having a space or resources for kids to use for specific kinds of tasks or problems, or for extension activities, or for supplemental work when they've finished their other work might require a separate space if only to reduce distraction for other kids and for storage.

But I've also seen what kids can do with some craft sticks and Play-Doh®. Toss in some markers, a few sheets of construction paper, some chenille sticks, and random other stuff and who knows what they'll make? Give them access to a tablet or laptop with the ability to record something and stand back.

Then they'll be asking for other stuff when they say "It would be cool if we had something that let us. . . " because they might know exactly what they want but they have an image in their heads for what they want to create, to make.

So when schools and teachers talking about setting aside space so they can have a single place for making, I assume that's mostly for quality and damage control because making can be messy.

If you're waiting for a budget or a special room for a makerspace, stop waiting. Get some craft sticks, duct tape in different sizes and colors, chenille sticks, styrofoam shapes, and whatever else. Mismatched buttons, leftover pieces of cardboard, small nuts and bolts that don't seem to have a home, leftover wire, glue sticks, yarn or string. All kinds of stuff you can pick up while walking through Michael's, Hobby Lobby, your garage, and elsewhere. If you want to be organized, but each of them in their own bins or baskets. Or just make the stuff available on a table or on a shelf in your classroom.

....read more

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Jumpstart Projects with Cayenne - myDevices Cayenne

Jumpstart Projects with Cayenne - myDevices Cayenne | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Jumpstart Raspberry Pi & Arduino Projects with Cayenne
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Communicators Tours Driverless Car Test Site

The Communicators tours the Mobility Transformation Center at the University of Michigan to see how this test site can help car companies develop wireless…
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Lessons Learned from the 2016 AP Chemistry Exam

Lessons Learned from the 2016 AP Chemistry Exam | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Lessons Learned from the 2016 AP Chemistry Exam

Tue, Oct 4, 2016 6:00 PM - 7:00 PM CDT
Show in My Time Zone
This presentation will outline the process involved in the creation and refinement of the AP Chemistry Exam, and it will discuss the elaborate measures taken to ensure the consistent, fair, and accurate grading of the free-response section. The presentation will then review in detail all the free-response questions from the 2016 AP Chemistry Exam and highlight the most common…Read more
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K12 Engineering Postcast #STEM

Promoting education in engineering and design for all ages. Produced by Pius Wong, engineer.

This podcast is for educators, engineers, entrepreneurs, and parents interested in bringing engineering to younger ages. Listen to real conversations among various professionals in the engineering education space, as we try to find better ways to educate and inspire kids in engineering thinking.

Topics to cover are intended to be wide-ranging. They include overcoming institutional barriers to engineering in K12, cool ways to teach engineering, equity in access to engineering, industry needs for engineers, strategies for training teachers, "edtech" solutions for K12 classrooms, curriculum and pedagogy reviews, and research on how kids learn engineering knowledge and skills. Thanks for listening!
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Preparing Students for a Project-Based World

Preparing Students for a Project-Based World | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it

Authored by Bonnie Lathram, Bob Lenz and Tom Vander Ark


In the paper, Preparing Students for a Project-Based World, released jointly by Getting Smart and Buck Institute for Education (BIE), we explore equity, economic realities, student engagement and instructional and school design in the preparation of all students for college, career and citizenship.

The new economic realities are illustrated by Robin Chase, founder of Zipcar: “My father had one job in his life. I’ve had six in mine, my kids will have six at the same time.”

Throughout the paper, authors Bonnie Lathram, Bob Lenz and Tom Vander Ark describe how the new economy and growing inequities are impacting students and schools, and what we need to be doing to better prepare students for a project-based world.

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The Power of Curiosity

The Power of Curiosity | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Research shows when people are curious about something, not only do they learn better, they learn more. It should come as no surprise, then, that inquiry-based learning is proving to be an effective education model. Inquiry-based learning occurs when students discover and construct information with the teacher’s guidance. It is a learner-centered model that arouses students’ curiosity and motivates them to seek their own answers. Increasingly, technology is the foundation of an effective inquiry-based lesson. Download this Center for Digital Education paper to learn more about inquiry-based learning and how you can support this model in your classrooms. The paper also offers sample lesson plans that draw upon inquiry-based strategies with the integration of technology.
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Brit Morin: Inspiring Creativity with Great Content [Entire Talk] | Stanford eCorner

Brit Morin: Inspiring Creativity with Great Content [Entire Talk] | Stanford eCorner | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Brit Morin, founder and CEO of Brit + Co, describes her path and motivation for launching a platform that aims to inspire women and girls to be creative through compelling content such as videos, online classes and do-it-yourself kits. Morin explains how creativity is sparked by rekindling that playful spirit from our youth and stems from the primal instinct to make things.
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Maker Promise

Maker Promise | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
In March 2016, Digital Promise and Maker Ed issued a call-to-action for school leaders around the country to commit to growing the next generation of American makers, by committing to dedicate a space, designate a champion, and display the results of maker education.
School leaders across the country answered the call.
Over 1,400 schools representing one million students in all
50 states
signed the Maker Promise.

These schools are leading the movement to harness new digital design and production abilities to unleash students’ passion, creativity, and capacity to make. But it doesn’t stop with them.

You can join this movement by signing the Maker Promise today.
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Students on STEM | Change the Equation

Students on STEM | Change the Equation | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
More Hands-on, Real-World ExperiencesA new survey of American teenagers from the Amgen Foundation and Change the Equation finds that teens like science and would welcome the opportunity to do more engaging, hands-on science in school.  Yet the survey also reveals that teens lack access to real-world science experiences, out-of-school opportunities, and professional mentors, which is limiting their chances to pursue science any further.
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The Maker Movement Isn't Just About Making and Electronics: EdSurge Talks to MIT's Mitch Resnick

The Maker Movement Isn't Just About Making and Electronics: EdSurge Talks to MIT's Mitch Resnick | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Mitchel Resnick (or Mitch, for short) knows his making—from a lot of different angles. And he’s not too bought into the whole “electronics and gadgets” side of the maker movement.

Resnick has been in this business for more than 30 years, and it’s safe to say that he’s seen the maker movement—and the state of STEM education, in general—go through its phases, its ups and downs. He’s currently the LEGO Papert Professor of Learning Research and head of the Lifelong Kindergarten group at the MIT Media Lab, where he and his team have developed products familiar to many a science educator: the "programmable brick" technology that inspired the LEGO Mindstorms robotics kit, and Scratch, an online computing environment for students to learn about computer science.

It's not the media or materials, but what you do with it.
Mitch Resnick, MIT Professor and head of Lifelong Kindergarten group
Is making something that every school should be doing—and are all interpretations of “making” of equitable value? EdSurge sat down with Resnick in his office at the MIT Media Lab to learn more, and to find out how he and his team are working to bring more creativity into the learning process.

E: Thanks for sitting down with us, Mitch. Let’s start off with a big question: When you have so many students in existence… how do you work with so many different types of learners?

A: Rather than trying to think how we educate all of these students, I think "how can we create opportunities for learning?" The spaces, the technologies that support everyone having rich learning experiences? Of course, everyone is going to have different pathways to learning, so you have to be aware that one size doesn't fit all.
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Get Involved - National Week of Making

Get Involved

There are many different ways that you can get involved and participate in the run up to and during the Week of Making!

Tell your Story as a Maker, Maker Educator or Maker Advocate

Are you a Maker with an innovative project or an interesting story? Do you know someone who has been an amazing advocate for supporting the Maker community in your city or town? If so, we want to get to know him/her. In the run up to the Week of Making, we’ll be featuring profiles of incredible Makers, Maker Educators and Maker Advocates across the U.S. on the Week of Making site.

To tell your story, submit a profile here.

Host an Event

Whether you’re one person, a maker space, community center, university, company or other organization, you can organize an event during the week and invite others in your community to participate. The event can be big or small, for students or adults, or both. It doesn’t matter as long as you’re having fun and making something! Make sure submit your event to this site here, so others can learn about it.

If you need some ideas, below is a snapshot of amazing events that took place throughout the country in 2015:

East Central High School (San Antonio, TX) offered an electronics and hardware programming course.
Muncie Public Library (Muncie IN) hosted a series of courses focused on designing, prototyping, and building things that fly.
Hofstra University (Hempstead, NY) organized iDesign student conferences to engage 6th-9th graders in designing and creating digital games.
The Alamance Makers Guild (Burlington, NC) hosted the Burlington Makeover Takeover, a free community celebration where Makers shared their projects, from wood turning to upcycled toys.
To get your event noticed, submit it here.

Attend an Event

Find an event in your community that you’re interested in and participate! Extra brownie points if you bring friends or family members with you. To check out the events near you, visit here.
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