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STEM Connections
Science, technology, engineering and math in K-12
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Moving at the Speed of Creativity | Preparing for STEM Lessons on Coding with Hopscotch for iPad

Moving at the Speed of Creativity | Preparing for STEM Lessons on Coding with Hopscotch for iPad | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

"This evening I’ve been playing with the free iPad app “Hopscotch,” which I’m planning to use for a four part / two week introductory unit on coding on the iPad with my 4th and 5th grade STEM students. (@iesSTEM) I’ve worked quite a bit with Scratch software from MIT, but this is my first time to “seriously play” with Hopscotch. Hopscotch is similar to Scratch, as a block-based (or icon-based) programming environment, but it is MUCH more limited with fewer available coding blocks. Despite these limitations, it appears to be a great app to use when introducing students to coding. And, it’s FREE! Since I have an iPad cart to use with students in my STEM classroom, but not full-day access to one of our school’s Windows-based computer labs, an iPad-based coding solution / app like Hopscotch is preferable for me now over Scratch. (Scratch is still flash-based, so although it’s web-based it doesn’t work completely on iPads. I’ve tried using Scratch on flash-friendly iPad browser apps like iSwifter and Puffin, but haven’t found the experience very good… yet.)"


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Facebook Just Recognized a New Country

Facebook Just Recognized a New Country | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
Physical map of Kosovo (Wikimedia Commons) The world's largest social network, Facebook, has finally listed Kosovo as its own country—more than five years after the breakaway territory proclaimed independence from Serbia and after more than 100...

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Global Warming Effect: Major Iceberg Cracks off Pine Island Glacier

Global Warming Effect: Major Iceberg Cracks off Pine Island Glacier | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
Landsat 8 captures a view of the ice separating from the ice shelf.

 

Between November 9–11, 2013, a large iceberg finally separated from the calving front of Antarctica’s Pine Island Glacier. Scientists first detected a rift in the glacier in October 2011 during flights for NASA’s Operation IceBridge. By July 2013, infrared and radar images indicated that the crack had cut completely across the ice shelf to the southwestern edge. New images now show that Iceberg B-31 is finally moving away from the coast, with open water between the iceberg and the edge of Pine Island Glacier.

 

The Operational Land Imager on the Landsat 8 satellite acquired these natural-color images of the iceberg in Pine Island Bay on November 13 (top) and October 28, 2013. Clouds and fog make the November 13 image a bit hazy, but the open-water gap between the iceberg and the ice shelf is still apparent. 

 

Named B-31 by the U.S. National Ice Center, the new iceberg is estimated to be 35 kilometers by 20 kilometers (21 by 12 miles), roughly the size of Singapore. A team of scientists from Sheffield and Southampton universities will track the 700 square-kilometer chunk of ice and try to predict its path using satellite data.

 

“It is hard to predict with certainty where and when these things will drift,” said NASA glaciologist Kelly Brunt.“Icebergs move pretty slowly, and watching this iceberg will be a waiting game.”

 

The shelf of Pine Island Glacier has been moving forward at roughly 4 kilometers per year, so the calving of this iceberg is not necessarily a surprise, noted Tom Wagner, NASA’s cryosphere program manager. Such events happen about every five or six years, though Iceberg B-31 is about 50 percent larger than previous ones in this area.

 

Scientists have been studying Pine Island Glacier closely because there is evidence that warmer seawater below the shelf will cause the ice grounding line to retreat and the glacier to thin and speed up.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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The Periodic Table of Videos

The Periodic Table of Videos | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

Short films about the chemistry of elements, presented by The Periodic Table of Videos.


Via Monica Mayer, John Purificati
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nice resource

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Turning Wellesley into STEM central - The Swellesley Report

Turning Wellesley into STEM central - The Swellesley Report | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
Turning Wellesley into STEM central
The Swellesley Report
The highlight of the effort will be the actual 4-hour science fair, which organizers say is intended to interest students K-12 but also adults.
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Insect-like robots to conduct climate research over rainforests

Insect-like robots to conduct climate research over rainforests | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
A flying, insect-like robot will give an unprecedented look at Peru's tropical cloud forest, one of the world's most biodiverse ecosystems and a key indicator of global climate change.

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Sea Level Rise Mapped In 'Drown Your Town' Visualization Of Cities Around the ... - iScienceTimes.com

Sea Level Rise Mapped In 'Drown Your Town' Visualization Of Cities Around the ... - iScienceTimes.com | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

"Climate change is becoming an increasingly important priority for nations around the world as the impact of rising sea levels becomes more visible and extreme weather events such as hurricanes and tornadoes become more frequent.

 

To bring attention to the global issue of rising sea level, San Francisco deep-sea ecologist and population geneticist Andrew David Thaler devised an application for Google Earth maps that shows how cities around the world might be impacted under levels of flooding ranging from one meter up to 80 meters. Some of Thaler's images were included in a slide show in an article by Mark Fischetti in the Nov. 9 issue of Scientific American."

 

Source:  http://www.isciencetimes.com/


Via ghbrett
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Norfolk Va? paying attention?

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ghbrett's curator insight, November 14, 2013 4:55 PM

This is an interesting article to read. It also includes a link to an explanation by Andrew David Thaler how to use Google Earth to experience the impacts of rising waters on your town as well.

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OpenScientist: New Mobile Citizen Science App for Ocean and Shark Lovers

OpenScientist: New Mobile Citizen Science App for Ocean and Shark Lovers | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
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Why Do Leaves Change Color and Fall Off Trees?

Why Do Leaves Change Color and Fall Off Trees? | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
If you're driving through Connecticut, you've probably noticed a lot of colors on your commute. Fall foliage has been on full display these last few weeks,

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Future Timeline of Our Solar System, Our Galaxy and Our Universe

Future Timeline of Our Solar System, Our Galaxy and Our Universe | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

The biological and geological future of the Earth can be extrapolated based upon the estimated effects of several long-term influences. These include the chemistry at the Earth's surface, the rate of cooling of the planet's interior, the gravitational interactions with other objects in the Solar System, and a steady increase in the Sun's luminosity. An uncertain factor in this extrapolation is the ongoing influence of technology introduced by humans, such as geoengineering, which could cause significant changes to the planet. The current biotic crisis is being caused by technology and the effects may last for up to five million years. In turn, technology may result in the extinction of humanity, leaving the planet to gradually return to a slower evolutionary pace resulting solely from long-term natural processes. Over time intervals of hundreds of millions of years, random celestial events pose a global risk to the biosphere, which can result in mass extinctions. These include impacts by comets or asteroids with diameters of 5–10 km (3.1–6.2 mi) or more, and the possibility of a massive stellar explosion, called a supernova, within a 100-light-year radius from the Sun, called a Near-Earth supernova. Other large-scale geological events are more predictable. If the long-term effects of global warming are disregarded, Milankovitch theory predicts that the planet will continue to undergo glacial periods at least until the quaternary glaciation comes to an end. These periods are caused by eccentricity, axial tilt, and precession of the Earth's orbit. As part of the ongoing supercontinent cycle, plate tectonics will probably result in a supercontinent in 250–350 million years. Some time in the next 1.5–4.5 billion years, the axial tilt of the Earth may begin to undergo chaotic variations, with changes in the axial tilt of up to 90°. During the next four billion years, the luminosity of the Sun will steadily increase, resulting in a rise in the solar radiation reaching the Earth. This will cause a higher rate of weathering of silicate minerals, which will cause a decrease in the level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. In about 600 million years, the level of CO 2 will fall below the level needed to sustain C3 carbon fixation photosynthesis used by trees. Some plants use the C4 carbon fixation method, allowing them to persist at CO 2 concentrations as low as 10 parts per million. However, the long-term trend is for plant life to die off altogether. The die off of plants will be the demise of almost all animal life, since plants are the base of the food chain on Earth. In about 1.1 billion years, the solar luminosity will be 10% higher than at present. This will cause the atmosphere to become a "moist greenhouse", resulting in a runaway evaporation of the oceans. As a likely consequence, plate tectonics will come to an end. Following this event, the planet's magnetic dynamo may come to an end, causing the magnetosphere to decay and leading to an accelerated loss of volatiles from the outer atmosphere. Four billion years from now, the increase in the Earth's surface temperature will cause a runaway greenhouse effect. By that point, most if not all the life on the surface will be extinct. The most probable fate of the planet is absorption by the Sun in about 7.5 billion years, after the star has entered the red giant phase and expanded to cross the planet's current orbit.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, John Purificati
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Happy GIS Day


Via Seth Dixon
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Interesting, educational and new learning for some.

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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 20, 2013 1:14 PM

Geospatial awarness and application is important GIS Day allows people to learn about and plug in to present technology that helps make geopraphy more palpable and easier to understand. There are more and more resources and advancements that have been made available to teach us and simply things in the world around us. understanding relatability and awareness helps us to answer questions about geography that we might not know because of distance and allows those who are preparing to be social studies or history majors to communicate to their students a better understanding of the world around them, and as time passes more helpful resources will be teaching aides in the classroom

Pájaro Chogüí's curator insight, November 26, 2013 4:42 PM

torne47@yahoo.es

 

Mr Inniss's curator insight, July 21, 2014 7:03 PM

Well, you may have missed 2013, but the next one is going on in Birmingham on the 20th of November: http://www.gisday.com/gis-day-events-map.html

 

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Coding, Making, and the Arts: Essential Tools for Students | MindShift

Coding, Making, and the Arts: Essential Tools for Students | MindShift | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

"Some of the most important subject areas and activities we want students to learn are the very ones that are left out of many schools: the arts, computer programming, and learning to making things by hand."


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Excellent article.

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How to make an exploding sandwich bag

This video shows you a how to do an easy kitchen science experiment using bicarb, vinegar and a plastic ziplock sandwich bag. Learn more about the exploding ...
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teach the process of investigate and experimentation with safe materials.

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Astronomers Witness An Extraordinarily Bright Stellar Explosion

Astronomers Witness An Extraordinarily Bright Stellar Explosion | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
On April 27, NASA’s Fermi and Swift satellites detected a record-setting burst from a dying star located in a nearby galaxy. Most likely the result of a massive supernova, it produced the highest-energy light ever detected by scientists.

 

Above image: The map above shows gamma-ray energies above 100 million electron volts (MeV). The first frame shows the sky during a three-hour interval just before the explosion. The second frame shows a three-hour interval starting 2.5 hours before the burst, and ending a half-hour into the event. Credit: NASA/DOE/Fermi LAT Collaboration.

 

The gamma-ray burst, called GRB 130427A, has wowed astronomers for a host of reasons. Not only was it freakishly powerful — one gamma-ray was measured at 94 billion electron volts (GeV) — but it was uncharacteristically long-lasting; the burst lasted for hours and was detectable for most of the day by Fermi’s Large Area Telescope (LAT). It produced 35 billion times the energy of visible light, and is about three times more powerful than the LAT’s previous record.

 

The explosion set a new record for the longest gamma-ray emission from a gamma-ray burst. And at 3.6 billion light years away, it was actually quite close. GRB 130427A falls within the closest 5% of all supernovas ever recorded. Celestial explosions like these are exceptionally rare, happening only once every million years or so per galaxy. They’re also very difficult to detect; the hyperfast jet emanating out from the ensuing black hole has be to positioned directly towards Earth. Needless to say, astronomers are not able to see the vast majority of GRB events.

 

Gamma-ray bursts happen when massive stars run out of fuel and collapse under their tremendous weight. As the core collapses into a newly-formed black hole, jets of material shoot outward through the collapsing star at nearly the speed of light. The jets continue into space, where they interact with gas shed by the star to produce bright afterglows.

 

These explosions wreak havoc to the immediate area. Any habitable planet located within several thousand light years are likely to be sterilized by such events. "We have waited a long time for a gamma-ray burst this shockingly, eye-wateringly bright," noted Julie McEnery through an official statement. "The GRB lasted so long that a record number of telescopes on the ground were able to catch it while space-based observations were still ongoing." McEnery is a project scientist for the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.


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What The World Will Look Like If Nothing Is Done To Combat Climate Change - weather.com Climate Change: The State of the Science

What The World Will Look Like If Nothing Is Done To Combat Climate Change - weather.com Climate Change: The State of the Science | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
A visual tour of what happens if the world takes no action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and curb the worst impacts of climate change over the coming decades.
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Share this widely please.

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Pizza place geography - FlowingData

Pizza place geography - FlowingData | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
Most of the major pizza chains are within a 5-mile radius of where I live, so I have my pick, but I usually order from whatever place is closest to where I am. So it doesn't matter if there are more Domino's locations than Pizza ...

Via Jim Wells
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Interesting geography Pizza Parlor placement.

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Watch Earth's Forests Disappear Before Your Very Eyes

Watch Earth's Forests Disappear Before Your Very Eyes | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
From 2000 to 2012, the planet lost more than 888,000 square miles of tree cover.

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Home - www.TeachEngineering.org

Home - www.TeachEngineering.org | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

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John Purificati's curator insight, November 10, 2013 9:46 AM

Nice collection of ideas for K-12.

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Physics Week in Review: November 16, 2013 | Cocktail Party Physics, Scientific American Blog Network

Physics Week in Review: November 16, 2013 | Cocktail Party Physics, Scientific American Blog Network | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
This week, my guest on Virtually Speaking Science was TIME health reporter Maia Szalavitz, who specializes in addiction, among other topics. We started by discussing the ...

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Transforming Science Education Infographic

Transforming Science Education Infographic | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
Do you agree with the following statement?

Via David Mackzum, Ed.D.
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Beyond Minecraft: Games That Inspire Building and Exploration

Beyond Minecraft: Games That Inspire Building and Exploration | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
The success and popularity of Minecraft in and out of classrooms is no surprise.

Via Skip Zalneraitis
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