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NASA Plans to Put an 'Iron Man' Robot on Mars

NASA Plans to Put an 'Iron Man' Robot on Mars | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
At 6'2", 275 pounds, NASA's latest robot might be a decent football player, but Valkyrie is earmarked for another human profession--astronaut.
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's insight:

This is interesting.

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STEM Connections
Science, technology, engineering and math in K-12
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ArcGIS Explorer (Free GIS software)

ArcGIS Explorer (Free GIS software) | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
Esri is the world leader in GIS (geographic information system) modeling and mapping software and technology.

 

Not the full blown 10.0 GIS software package, it's a viewer.  But it is a free download that might fit some of your tight budgets. 


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Grammie's comment, September 23, 2011 1:30 PM
Sounds great
Seth Dixon's comment, September 23, 2011 3:04 PM
It is. I believe that they even have a one designed for the iPad.
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STEM seeds | a community of STEM teachers sharing lesson ideas

STEM seeds | a community of STEM teachers sharing lesson ideas | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

Jim Lerman's insight:

 

A great (fairly) new site where Wes Fryer is gathering all sorts of resources for mostly (K-8) STEM teachers. Archived here are periodic Google hangouts, ideas, and links. Check back often, this is sure to grow to an increasingly rich resource.

 

A running record of all the links and ideas from each of the hangouts is posted as a Goggle Doc here


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THE GRADE: Frontier High students launch service projects - Bakersfield Californian

THE GRADE: Frontier High students launch service projects - Bakersfield Californian | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
THE GRADE: Frontier High students launch service projects Bakersfield Californian The classes, according to a PG&E press release, will be based on nationally sponsored Boys & Girls Clubs programs that offer career exploration, financial literacy...
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A Month of Math, Magic and Mystery | Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network

A Month of Math, Magic and Mystery | Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
Haven’t got the Math Awareness Month bug yet? Here are three teasers to get you started:

1. What read the same right side up and upside down, ...
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Fast Home Wireless: A Content Weapon?

Fast Home Wireless: A Content Weapon? | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
Following a recent announcement by Qualcomm, another semiconductor maker announces a huge upgrade in the speed of wireless home routers. The Broadcom offering is expected to allow all sorts of devices to send video at speeds that make transmitting content as easy as changing channels.
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Growing interest in STEM [Commentary] - Baltimore Sun

Growing interest in STEM [Commentary] - Baltimore Sun | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
Growing interest in STEM [Commentary] Baltimore Sun The dearth of women and certain minorities in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) fields represents a huge problem within this country and is a crisis often repeated in the...

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Can You Identify These Cities From Their Light Signatures?

Can You Identify These Cities From Their Light Signatures? | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

"The light that a city emits is like its glowing fingerprint. From the orderly grid of Manhattan, to the sprawling, snaking streets of Milan, to the bright contrast of Kuwait’s ring-roads, each city leaves its own pattern of tiny glowing dots. See if you can ID these cities based on the way they shine."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 12, 6:59 PM

This short quiz of 16 cities combines several analytic components of geography that you won't see in more standard map quizzes for regional geography;  this draws on some similar skills similar to the map quiz that was based on identifying the city based on Starbucks locations.  Some recognition of local spatial patterns from previous map analysis can make this quiz easier but there are still some cities that you haven't ever looked at from space before.  Things to consider as you attempt this quiz:  Which of the four possible selections can you rule out out?  What enabled you to eliminate those selections (e.g.-coastal, scale, size, grid pattern, transportation systems, density, etc.)?  What does to layout of the city tell us about the planning and historical origins of the city?  Is there one urban model that best helps us explain the configuration of this city?     


Tags: urbanmodels, planning, density, urbanism, unit 7 citiestrivia.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, April 14, 8:00 AM

Geography education

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The science of anatomy is undergoing a revival - The Conversation

The science of anatomy is undergoing a revival - The Conversation | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
The Conversation The science of anatomy is undergoing a revival The Conversation Anatomy gained impetus, even catapulting scientists such as Thomas Henry Huxley (“Darwin's bulldog”) into celebrity status, from the realisation that organisms had a...
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What a great article and accumulated resources.

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Math alive - Game based Learning - YouTube

Math alive - Game based Learning izle, Math alive - Game based Learning video, Math alive - Game based Learning hd A topic that affects the UK's industrial g...

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Chris Carter's curator insight, April 8, 6:00 PM

Growth mind set and GBL. Brilliant!

Chris Carter's comment, April 8, 7:07 PM
Hi Bonnie, it is my pleasure to bring sometimes overlooked content to the fore.
Chris Carter's comment, April 13, 4:37 AM
Makhtar, it is my pleasure. Thank you for spreading the message on this useful resource!
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Self Taught Teen Wows MIT

Self Taught Teen Wows MIT | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
via KarmaTube Self Taught Teen Wows MI In Sierra Leone, West Africa, the lights may come on once in a week, with the rest of the month, dark. So, Kelvin Doe made his own battery to power lights in ...

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Aerial Photographs Catalogue the Life and Death of Volcanic Islands

Aerial Photographs Catalogue the Life and Death of Volcanic Islands | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

Volcanic islands can seem to appear out of nowhere, emerging from the ocean like breaching monsters of the deep. Below, Mika McKinnon explains how these odd geological formations are born, how they evolve, and how they eventually vanish back beneath the waves.


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PIRatE Lab's curator insight, April 7, 8:50 AM

Darwin was the first to bring an academic overview to the formation of these coral-harboring islands but the beauty and diversity were really first brought home with free aerial imagery (ala Google Earth, etc.).


Where an island is along this developmental continuum says much about the human populations that may inhabit said island.  If the island is tall and young with rich volcanic soil, the mountain will attract rainfall and the soil could support agriculture, making the island able to sustain a higher population density.  On the other hand, an old, eroding island with little rainfall and depleted soils will need human inhabitants to rely on the ocean's resources for food and would thus support a more minimal population.  These islands are changing, even if the time scale is slow--but just recently two disconnected islands 'merged' as growing volcanic island has expanded in the Pacific.

Tracey M Benson's curator insight, April 7, 2:15 PM

Insight from Seth Dixon:

Where an island is along this developmental continuum says much about the human populations that may inhabit said island.  If the island is tall and young with rich volcanic soil, the mountain will attract rainfall and the soil could support agriculture, making the island able to sustain a higher population density.  On the other hand, an old, eroding island with little rainfall and depleted soils will need human inhabitants to rely on the ocean's resources for food and would thus support a more minimal population.  These islands are changing, even if the time scale is slow--but just recently two disconnected islands 'merged' as growing volcanic island has expanded in the Pacific. 

Helen Rowling's curator insight, April 17, 1:55 PM

Geographical wonders.

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2014 Carl Sagan Fellows Chose By NASA - RedOrbit

2014 Carl Sagan Fellows Chose By NASA - RedOrbit | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
RedOrbit 2014 Carl Sagan Fellows Chose By NASA RedOrbit The primary goal of the fellowship program is to support outstanding recent postdoctoral scientists in conducting independent research related to the science goals of NASA's Exoplanet...
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If the Earth Stood Still

If the Earth Stood Still | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

"The following is not a futuristic scenario. It is not science fiction. It is a demonstration of the results of an extremely unlikely, yet intellectually fascinating query: What would happen if the earth stopped spinning?  ArcGIS was used to perform complex raster analysis and volumetric computations and generate maps that visualize these results.


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Tracey M Benson's curator insight, April 4, 1:49 PM

What a fascinating question, answered as a visualisation: What would happen if the earth stopped spinning? ArcGIS was used to perform complex raster analysis and volumetric computations and generate maps that visualise the results.

Christian Allié's curator insight, April 5, 1:40 AM

........""""""""""""""""""""""......

 

[ ... ]

 

......... 

Most scientists agree that the solar day (related to the speed of rotation) is continuously getting longer. This minimal increase of the day length is due mainly to the oceanic tidal friction. When the estimated rate of the slowdown was projected back to past geologic eons, it showed that the length of a day was several hours shorter than today.

Consequently, during the Devonian period (400 million years ago), the earth rotated about 40 more times during one revolution around the sun than it does now. Because the continents have drifted significantly since that time, it is difficult to make estimates of the land versus ocean outlines for that era. However, we can be certain that—with a faster spinning speed in the past—the equatorial bulge of oceanic water was much larger then than it is today. Similarly, the ellipsoidal flattening of the earth was also more significant.

The influence of the rate of the earth's rotation has a dominant effect on the geometry of the globe, in terms of the globe's overall shape as well as the outline of the global ocean. The earth's physical relief is only a secondary factor controlling the delineation of oceans. The slowdown of earth's rotation will continue for 4 billion years—as long as we can imagine. The slowdown infinitesimally—but steadily—changes the globe's geometry and makes it dynamic. The net result of these dynamic adjustments is that the earth is slowly becoming more and more like a sphere. However, it will take billions of years before the earth stops spinning, and the gravitational equipotential creates a mean sea level that is a perfect sphere.

 

About the Author

Witold Fraczek is a longtime employee of Esri who currently works in the Application Prototype Lab. He received his doctorate in the application of GIS in forestry from Agricultural University and master's degrees in hydrology from the University of Warsaw, Poland, and remote sensing from the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

Melissa Marshall's curator insight, April 9, 7:25 PM

How interesting! The detailed GIS is fascinating and although an unlikely scenario, is great for discussion and deeper thought. You could discuss with students how the world would cope or what sort of device could start it spinning again...?

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NASA | Earthrise: The 45th Anniversary - YouTube

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Severe Scurvy Struck Christopher Columbus's Crew - National Geographic

Severe Scurvy Struck Christopher Columbus's Crew - National Geographic | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
National Geographic
Severe Scurvy Struck Christopher Columbus's Crew
National Geographic
(One of Tiesler's co-authors, her husband and colleague Andrea Cucina, is a National Geographic Society grantee, on a separate but related project.) Bones Speak.

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The World's Largest Trees

"The world's second-largest known tree, the President, in Sequoia National Park is photographed by National Geographic magazine photographer Michael 'Nick' Nichols for the December 2012 issue."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 16, 9:28 AM

There is a beauty and magnificent in nature, both is the microscopic and delicate as well as the grand and powerful.  The biosphere's diversity is a great part of it's allure that keeps geographers exploring for to understand the mysteries on our planet.  The incredible image at the end of this project really is truly stunning.  


Tags: biogeography, environmentecology, California.

Hemant Galviya's curator insight, April 16, 11:55 PM

hiiiiiiiiiiii

Miroslav Sopko's curator insight, April 18, 8:44 AM

Najväčšie stromy sveta.

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Twitter in the Classroom

Twitter in the Classroom | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
 
Hello Organized Classroom Readers,
 
It is Kristy from the 2 Peas and a Dog blog. One of the things I started this year was using Twitter to communicate with students and parents about homework and upcoming assignments, tests and events.

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K-12 Educators « Astronomical Society

K-12 Educators « Astronomical Society | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

.

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's insight:

Good resources here.

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The Science behind Google Earth

The Science behind Google Earth | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

"Google is using a new technology to automatically generate  3D buildings from 45-degree angle aerial photography made by overlapping passes of aircraft.  The aerial photos are combined to create 3D models."


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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 15, 6:37 AM

unit one

Annenkov's curator insight, April 15, 9:46 PM

This technology of visualization I would name "3D landscape"

Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, April 16, 5:40 PM

Tecnología para generar imágenes en 3D con Google Earth

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Stressful environments genetically affect African American boys - Science Codex

Stressful environments genetically affect African American boys - Science Codex | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
Science Codex Stressful environments genetically affect African American boys Science Codex A study of 40 9-year-old black boys, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, shows that those who grow up in disadvantaged...
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8 Reasons For Teaching Kindness In School

8 Reasons For Teaching Kindness In School | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
8 Reasons For Teaching Kindness In School

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Tools & Resources — Connect — Voices of Youth

Tools & Resources — Connect — Voices of Youth | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
Learn, share, advocate.

Via Rachael Dixon, Sally
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Rachael Dixon's curator insight, June 9, 2013 8:38 PM

Templates and resources - students engaging in social (health promoting) action and an opportunity to contribute to a global debate. 

katie Dobson's curator insight, June 10, 2013 11:06 PM

Great tool to use when teaching 2.3 

Health & PE NZ's curator insight, June 25, 2013 1:41 PM

Health promotion 2.3

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Dr. Louis Uccellini: 'Building a Weather Ready Nation' - WGNtv.com

Dr. Louis Uccellini: 'Building a Weather Ready Nation' - WGNtv.com | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
Dr. Louis Uccellini: 'Building a Weather Ready Nation'
WGNtv.com
I marvel thinking back on the things I learned on during those map room gatherings from Louis! His career was to take off after leaving UW-Madison on the shores of Lake Mendota.
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Technology: Special Education Resources | Reso...

Technology:  Special Education Resources | Reso... | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
Video: Assistive Technology in Special Education (Video: Assistive Technology in Special Education http://t.co/2bPQnfp8Q7) (Technology: Special Education Resources | @scoopit http://t.co/PODsY5tMn6)...
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Building a War of 1812 Warship

Building a War of 1812 Warship | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
This summer, a ship named after naval hero Oliver Hazard Perry will set sail

 

Oliver Hazard Perry, the U.S naval officer who won a decisive victory against the Royal Navy on Lake Erie during the War of 1812—“We have met the enemy and they are ours,” he declared—would have appreciated the irony. An extraordinary new sailing ship was supposed to be a replica of a British warship that his flotilla captured. But when the Canadian group behind the venture ran out of money, enthusiasts in Rhode Island bought the unfinished 138-foot-long steel hull and named it after Perry, an Ocean State native. Six years and more than $10 million later, the three-masted, 20-sail tall ship will launch this summer from the Newport Shipyard. And while it’s the first vessel of its kind to be built in the United States since 1903, it’s also fitted with 21st-century technology, such as twin six-cylinder backup engines.


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Is Google Making the Digital Divide Worse? | Re...

Is Google Making the Digital Divide Worse? | Re... | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
In the future envisioned by Google, Internet access will be a basic human right. Through its Roots in Science and Engineering Awards, the company plans to spend $1.5 million this year to support computer science education around the world.

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