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Storytelling with Maps

Public Maps Gallery.
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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's comment, September 6, 2013 5:01 AM
Story maps combine intelligent Web maps with Web applications and templates that incorporate text, multimedia, and interactive functions. Story maps inform, educate, entertain, and inspire people about a wide variety of topics.
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's comment, September 6, 2013 5:03 AM
Esri publishes story maps with three goals: To showcase interesting and important topics; to explore techniques and best practices for map-based storytelling; and to help enable people to make their own story maps. What's your story?

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STEM Connections
Science, technology, engineering and math in K-12
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STEM and Writing: A Super Combination - Edutopia

STEM and Writing: A Super Combination - Edutopia | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

"I brought a superhero into my classroom the other day. He wasn't wearing a cape. He didn't have an alias. But he had the greatest superpower of all: inspiration.

When you teach using project-based learning (PBL), one brings outside expertise into the classroom. My eighth graders begin the year creating science fiction based origin stories for original superhero characters as an introduction to a greater advocacy unit. Therefore, it seemed natural to bring in an actual scientist. Which brought me to CalTech and Dr. Spyridon Michalakis."


Via John Evans, Suvi Salo
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Big Data: Uncovering The Secrets of Our Universe At CERN

Big Data: Uncovering The Secrets of Our Universe At CERN | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

CERN is best known these days as the research organization which operates the Large Hadron Collider – the largest and most complicated science experiment ever…


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The Precision Agriculture Revolution

The Precision Agriculture Revolution | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

"Thousands of years ago, agriculture began as a highly site-specific activity. The first farmers were gardeners who nurtured individual plants, and they sought out the microclimates and patches of soil that favored those plants. But as farmers acquired scientific knowledge and mechanical expertise, they enlarged their plots, using standardized approaches—plowing the soil, spreading animal manure as fertilizer, rotating the crops from year to year—to boost crop yields. Over the years, they developed better methods of preparing the soil and protecting plants from insects and, eventually, machines to reduce the labor required. Starting in the nineteenth century, scientists invented chemical pesticides and used newly discovered genetic principles to select for more productive plants. Even though these methods maximized overall productivity, they led some areas within fields to underperform. Nonetheless, yields rose to once-unimaginable levels: for some crops, they increased tenfold from the nineteenth century to the present.  

Today, however, the trend toward ever more uniform practices is starting to reverse, thanks to what is known as 'precision agriculture.' Taking advantage of information technology, farmers can now collect precise data about their fields and use that knowledge to customize how they cultivate each square foot."

 

Tags: technology, food production, agriculture, agribusiness, spatial, GPS.


Via Seth Dixon
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Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, Today, 12:54 PM

Farmers now have the ability to use a new process of "precision agriculture." This allows farmers to gain data on each area of land, thus creating even greater yields. 

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How Suburban Are Big American Cities?

How Suburban Are Big American Cities? | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

"What, exactly, is a city? Technically, cities are legal designations that, under state laws, have specific public powers and functions. But many of the largest American cities — especially in the South and West — don’t feel like cities, at least not in the high-rise-and-subways, 'Sesame Street' sense. Large swaths of many big cities are residential neighborhoods of single-family homes, as car-dependent as any suburb.

Cities like Austin and Fort Worth in Texas and Charlotte, North Carolina, are big and growing quickly, but largely suburban. According to Census Bureau data released Thursday, the population of the country’s biggest cities (the 34 with at least 500,000 residents) grew 0.99 percent in 2014 — versus 0.88 percent for all metropolitan areas and 0.75 percent for the U.S. overall. But city growth isn’t the same as urban growth. Three cities of the largest 10 are more suburban than urban, based on our analysis of how people describe the neighborhoods where they live."

 

Tags: urban, suburbs, housing, sprawl, planning, density.


Via Seth Dixon
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On the Trail of Captain John Smith

On the Trail of Captain John Smith | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
Go on an interactive journey with Captain John Smith to discover Jamestown and the year 1607!
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's insight:

http://www.nationalgeographic.com/chesapeake/resources/

 

 

 

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Science Just Discovered Something Amazing About What Childhood Piano Lessons Did to You

Science Just Discovered Something Amazing About What Childhood Piano Lessons Did to You | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
If your parents forced you to practice your scales by saying it would "build character," they were onto something. The Washington Post reports that one of the largest scientific studies into music's effect on the brain has found something striking: Musical training doesn't just affect your musical ability — it provides tremendous benefits to children's emotional and behavioral maturation. The study by the University of Vermont College of Medicine found that even those who never made it past nursery rhyme songs and do-re-mi's likely received some major developmental benefits just from playing. The study provides even more evidence as to why providing children with high-quality music education may be one of the [...]
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Lon Woodbury's curator insight, May 24, 2:12 AM

I especially liked the observation that schools that deprive most of their students of studying music or the arts are depriving them of much more than simply not learning an instrument - it is depriving them of a good way to developed executive function for one thing. -Lon 

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, May 24, 10:47 PM

I think having to concentrate the way a person does to learn scales and music helps children focus and be mindful.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Prague astronomical clock | Wikiwand

Prague astronomical clock | Wikiwand | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
The Prague astronomical clock, or Prague orloj , is a medieval astronomical clock located in Prague, the capital of the Czech Republic. The clock was first installed in 1410, making it the third-oldest astronomical clock in the world and the oldest one still working.
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Your Contribution to the California Drought

Your Contribution to the California Drought | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
The average American consumes more than 300 gallons of California water each week by eating food that was produced there.
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Scientists discover gorgeous and fragile new sea creatures

Scientists discover gorgeous and fragile new sea creatures | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
Scientists aboard the schooner TARA found new species of plankton and other creatures, while discovering their sensitivity to changing ocean conditions.
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Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Geography Education
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Plate Tectonics and the Formation of Central America and the Caribbean

This animation is made from a time series of maps reconstructing the movements of continental crust or blocks, as South America pulled away from North America, starting 170 million years ago. Note that South America is still clinging to Africa at the beginning of the series.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 22, 4:37 PM

The land bridge connecting North and South America is hardly permanent (on a geological time scale that is).  This video is an animated version of the still maps from this article.  


Tags: Mexico, tectonicsphysical, video, Middle America.

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A Test of Education Reform - Education Next

A Test of Education Reform - Education Next | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
I’m a strong supporter of assessments and accountability, and I wouldn't opt out, but I think it’s unfair to discount the views of those who disagree.
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's insight:

It would be nice if the testing was year beginning and year ending for a student, so that the "blame' IS FAIRLY placed.

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The Anatomy of a Tornado

Jim Cantore gives an INCREDIBLE step-by-step description and 3D view into how a tornado forms - like you've never seen before!

 

Tags: physical, weather and climate, visualization.


Via Seth Dixon
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Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, May 22, 7:37 PM

JIM CANTORE MUESTRA PASO A PASO EL DESARROLLO DE UN TORNADO EN 3D

Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 24, 2:41 PM

This amazing video shows everything from funnel clouds and weak tornadoes to F5, tornadoes which cause major damage. It explains how a tornado originates from a super cell (rotating thunderstorm) to how it forms from a rear flank downdraft. 

When identifying the formation of a tornado and the direction in which it will be heading, satellite imagery and aerial photography are needed for accurate data.

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Computer or Pen ... why not both!

Computer or Pen ... why not both! | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
The Phree is an interesting device that will probably be very useful to a lot of people. The Phree is a pen that can write on pretty much

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Nature Conservancy | Protecting Nature, Preserving Life

Nature Conservancy | Protecting Nature, Preserving Life | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
The Nature Conservancy protects Earth's natural resources and beauty. Our conservation efforts are driven by our members. Act Now.
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Turning the iPad into a mini-production studio

Turning the iPad into a mini-production studio | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
The kids in Dave Basulto's high school video class were producing shaky videos, poor sound and lighting, so he decided to invent a rig to fix those ills. His creation: the iOgrapher,
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The Greatest Mathematicians Infographic - e-Learning Infographicse-Learning Infographics

The Greatest Mathematicians Infographic - e-Learning Infographicse-Learning Infographics | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
The Greatest Mathematicians Infographic - e-Learning Infographicse-Learning Infographics.

Via professorsharma
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Transforming Cities for Sustainability

Transforming Cities for Sustainability | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
Mark Tercek and Pascal Mittermaier discuss the world’s urban future, green cities and why leaders should incorporate nature into urban planning.
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A Step-by-Step Guide to the Best Projects - Edutopia ~ by Mariko Nobori

A Step-by-Step Guide to the Best Projects - Edutopia ~ by Mariko Nobori | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
We followed a sophomore world studies class through a three-week project called Controlling Factors, created by teaching partners Mary Mobley (English) and Michael Chambers (world history). They designed a project that capitalized on the wild popularity among their students of the best-selling novel The Hunger Games. Built on specific English and world history state standards, the project covered concepts including the pre-World War II global economic crisis, the rise of totalitarianism, and the societal moral dilemmas that world leaders at that time faced, and then had students draw parallels to similar fictional themes in the book.

Here is a breakdown of key steps, with some examples from Mobley and Chambers's project:

Via Jim Lerman
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Sample Student's curator insight, May 24, 5:21 PM

The project based learning approach is another PBL - the same acronym as Problem Based Learning. Are they the same thing? Read Edutopia http://www.edutopia.org/blog/pbl-vs-pbl-vs-xbl-john-larmer for explanation. But the key message here is authenticity, meaning, complexity, learner-centredness, cross-curricular thinking, and collaboration. These are key pedagogies that are relevant to any discipline area. Although this may be focused on History and English, there are lessons to be found within this article that are relevant to any discipline area. It is an excellent informing article for everyone in our group.

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Saving Chesapeake Bay - It's a Job - YouTube

Since the passage of federal clean water and air laws in the 1970s, a burgeoning new industry has sprouted that creates jobs and stimulates the economy throu...
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The Oregon Trail Generation: Life before and after mainstream tech

The Oregon Trail Generation: Life before and after mainstream tech | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
We’re an enigma, those of us born at the tail end of the '70s and the start of the '80s.
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's insight:

We’re an enigma, those of us born at the tail end of the '70s and the start of the '80s. Some of the “generational” experts lazily glob us on to Generation X, and others just shove us over to the Millennials they love to hate — no one really gets us or knows where we belong.

We’ve been called Generation Catalano, Xennials, and The Lucky Ones, but no name has really stuck for this strange micro-generation that has both a healthy portion of Gen X grunge cynicism and a dash of the unbridled optimism of Millennials.

A big part of what makes us the square peg in the round hole of named generations is our strange relationship with technology and the Internet. We came of age just as the very essence of communication was experiencing a seismic shift, and it’s given us a unique perspective that’s half analog old school and half digital new school.

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Urban Farmers Say It's Time They Got Their Own Research Farms

Urban Farmers Say It's Time They Got Their Own Research Farms | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
The University of the District of Columbia is the one land-grant university in the U.S. with an urban focus. It's leading research on growing food in raised beds, hoop houses and shipping containers.

 

Tags: agriculture, food, urban, unit 5 agriculture. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Katie's curator insight, May 22, 12:07 PM

The amount of food being grown in urban cities has increased. This increases the need to grow more in a smaller place. They also need help when they need a soil test or have a pest outbreak. In order to learn how to do that farmers turn to institutions. This article suggest that farmers need to have there own research farms. This is an example of issues in contemporary commercial agriculture. 

Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 24, 2:28 PM

Almost 80 percent of Americans live in urban areas and that means many people are wanting to grow their own food in the busy city life. To learn how to properly do this, these people turn to land-grant colleges and universities to give then helpful advice. Many colleges do help with urban and rural ares, but there is only one one in the entire country that is devoted singularly to urban farming; The University of the District of Columbia.

This is a great example of the distribution of agricultural and a great way to educate people on the proper way to cultivate and harvest your own food in small, limited spaces. It also proves that we really can prosper everywhere with the right tools and knowledge about urban farming.

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Girls With Toys: A Powerful, Funny, Inspiring Response to Sexism in Science

Girls With Toys: A Powerful, Funny, Inspiring Response to Sexism in Science | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
On Saturday morning, I turned on NPR while I made breakfast for my daughter and me. We had a big day ahead: first the farmers market, then a nearby forest preserve’s migratory bird festival featuring a mist-netting demonstration and the chance to take home and dissect your own owl pellet....
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Tim Peake asks for help in space food science experiment - BBC News

Tim Peake asks for help in space food science experiment - BBC News | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
British astronaut Tim Peake invites schoolchildren to help him in an experiment to learn more about how to grow food in space.
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