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Science, technology, engineering and math in K-12
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Israel Proves the Desalination Era Is Here

Israel Proves the Desalination Era Is Here | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
One of the driest countries on Earth now makes more freshwater than it needs

 

Driven by necessity, Israel is learning to squeeze more out of a drop of water than any country on Earth; researchers have pioneered new techniques in drip irrigation, water treatment and desalination. “The Middle East is drying up,” says Osnat Gillor, a professor at the Zuckerberg Institute who studies the use of recycled wastewater on crops. “The only country that isn’t suffering acute water stress is Israel.” That water stress has been a major factor in the turmoil tearing apart the Middle East, but Bar-Zeev believes that Israel’s solutions can help its parched neighbors, too — and in the process, bring together old enemies in common cause.

 

Tags: drought, water, environment, Israel, technology, Middle East.


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Susan Grice's curator insight, February 4, 8:51 AM
GReat!
1
Ivan Ius's curator insight, February 5, 5:03 PM
Geographic Concepts: Spatial Significance, Geographic Perspective
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The Worst Mistake in the History of the Human Race

The Worst Mistake in the History of the Human Race | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

"Forced to choose between limiting population or trying to increase food production, we chose the latter and ended up with starvation, warfare, and tyranny. Hunter-gatherers practiced the most successful and longest-lasting life style in human history. In contrast, we're still struggling with the mess into which agriculture has tumbled us, and it's unclear whether we can solve it."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 22, 2016 2:32 PM

Jared Diamond wrote this highly controversial essay back in the 80's and it still can elicit strong reactions from anthropologists, geographers, historians, and other scholars.  This is a good reading to give students during an agricultural unit.  This can get students to question many of the assumptions about humanity that they probably never knew they had (Diamond challenged the mainstream progressivist position).

 

Questions to Ponder: What is the progressivist view?  What were the negative impacts that early agriculture had on human health?  What social problems does Diamond attribute to agriculture?  What evidence would you present to argue against Diamond's position?

 

Tagsagriculturefolk culturestechnologyindigenous.

Eben Lenderking's curator insight, October 12, 2016 3:07 AM

Is it too late to reprogram ourselves?

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Robotics in Agriculture

Autonomous robots created at the University of Sydney can count fruit on trees, spray weeds, and even herd cows.

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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, May 20, 2016 10:08 AM
Until robots understand holism and acquire a metaphysical connection with Nature, agriculture will probably continue down a path where soon they'll design artificial bees for pollination, and chemical-exuding worms to breakdown the nutrients predigested by bacteria ... if that works, which I doubt.
John Edwards's curator insight, June 2, 2016 4:18 AM
I remember doing my GCSE French oral presentation on exactly this matter - "L'exode rural". Seems we're moving slower than I thought.
Nicole's curator insight, January 4, 5:10 PM

Is this the future of #Agriculture? #agrobots #ffce2017

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"The Father of GIS"

"Esri Canada pays tribute to Dr. Roger Tomlinson, known as the 'Father of GIS'. Dr. Tomlinson passed away on Feb. 7, 2014, leaving a remarkable legacy that laid the foundation for modern digital mapping and transformed the field of geography."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 8, 2016 1:52 PM

Two resources on pioneers in GIS. 

  • Here is a video about Roger Tomlinson, 'father of GIS.'
  • This is a nice article on the beginnings of ESRI and Jack Dangermond's impact on digital mapping.  

 

Tags: GIS, ESRI, mapping, cartography, geospatial, technology.

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History in motion

History in motion | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
History in Motion makes it easy to create, share, and explore animated
historical maps and scenarios.

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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, February 28, 2016 5:34 PM

This technology is a useful tool to help primary students make connections to past events and places. Create historical scenarios, animate events and communicate using History in Motion.

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4 Futuristic Gaming Technologies that will probably Blow your Mind

4 Futuristic Gaming Technologies that will probably Blow your Mind | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
A Video Featuring Futuristic Gaming Technologies that will probably Blow your Mind

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An amazing Documentary featuring Future Science & Technology Secrets - 2015

An amazing Documentary featuring Future Science & Technology Secrets -   2015 | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
Future Technology Secrets
An amazing Video featuring the future of Science and technology
with an emphasis on Quantum Mechanics.

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The Precision Agriculture Revolution

The Precision Agriculture Revolution | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

"Thousands of years ago, agriculture began as a highly site-specific activity. The first farmers were gardeners who nurtured individual plants, and they sought out the microclimates and patches of soil that favored those plants. But as farmers acquired scientific knowledge and mechanical expertise, they enlarged their plots, using standardized approaches—plowing the soil, spreading animal manure as fertilizer, rotating the crops from year to year—to boost crop yields. Over the years, they developed better methods of preparing the soil and protecting plants from insects and, eventually, machines to reduce the labor required. Starting in the nineteenth century, scientists invented chemical pesticides and used newly discovered genetic principles to select for more productive plants. Even though these methods maximized overall productivity, they led some areas within fields to underperform. Nonetheless, yields rose to once-unimaginable levels: for some crops, they increased tenfold from the nineteenth century to the present.  

Today, however, the trend toward ever more uniform practices is starting to reverse, thanks to what is known as 'precision agriculture.' Taking advantage of information technology, farmers can now collect precise data about their fields and use that knowledge to customize how they cultivate each square foot."

 

Tags: technology, food production, agriculture, agribusiness, spatial, GPS.


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Cade Johns's curator insight, December 2, 2015 9:57 AM

Agriculture has evolved very much over time to many different methods of growing things and theyve changed the way we affect the soil.-CJ

Samuel bennett's curator insight, January 10, 11:50 AM

In this article it talks about the development of agriculture  and how most of it started. This article relates to my world cultural geography class by telling how people used agriculture to provide for themselves and better there methods year after year. The use of technology and the pesticides they used to help there crops grow is similar  in our class to the was technology was developed and helped out a lot in the fields and in everyday life.

Alanna Thompson's curator insight, January 10, 1:17 PM

This is very interesting insight on how farmers use precision agriculture to customize how they cultivate each square foot of their fields. In my opinion precision agriculture is a good way for farmers to know exactly what they need to do to their field and what they should plant. It also is a way for them to make sure none of the areas within their field underperform. 

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How to Sell Education Technology to Even the Most Technophobic Teachers

How to Sell Education Technology to Even the Most Technophobic Teachers | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
  Dear Technology Integrator: Most modern teachers already use digital technology - yes, even the most technophobic ones: They email They surf the web for resources They use text messenging They cr...

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Becky Roehrs's curator insight, January 22, 2015 2:25 PM

Short and sweet-how to get teachers on board with technology..

rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, January 23, 2015 12:48 AM

I guess, we will contninue to need to sell technology to even the most Technophobic teachers. Technology is no just about checking emails, surfing the web for quick fix solutions!

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Why The U.S. Chills Its Eggs And Most Of The World Doesn't

Why The U.S. Chills Its Eggs And Most Of The World Doesn't | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
In many countries, eggs aren't refrigerated and they're still considered safe to eat. But in the U.S., we have to chill them, because we've washed away the cuticle that protects them from bacteria.

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aitouaddaC's comment, September 22, 2014 5:16 PM
Amazing !
Gareth Jukes's curator insight, March 24, 2015 10:38 PM

Variations of major zones and effects of markets-

 

This article describes why the U.S is one of the few countries that actually refrigerates their eggs. This is beacuse we had washed away the cuticle that protects eggs from bacteria. In other countries, they just leave eggs like how they were laid.

 

This article contributes to the idea of variations of markets by explaining how our country is one different from most of others by eggs. It also explains why we are one of the few that must chill the eggs, unlike other markets and/or venders.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 3:44 PM

For many Americans that are traveling abroad for the first time, realizing that eggs aren't in the refrigerator is a bit of a culture shock (not to mention the moment they find milk in a box that also isn't being refrigerated).  Agricultural practices dictate storage requirements and some things we might have imagined were universal are actually place-specific or peculiar to our cultural setting.  What we are taught to think of as gross, appropriate, attractive or even sanitary is often steeped in a cultural context.  So is it strange the we refrigerate our eggs in the United States, or that they don't in other places? 

 

Tags: food production, technology, industry, food, agriculture, perspective.

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Solar Roadways


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Gabriel Pizarro Dasso's curator insight, June 11, 2014 3:15 PM

creo que es al menos el mejor invento de diseño hasta hoy en día 

Nancy Watson's curator insight, June 13, 2014 9:26 AM

What an interesting idea. Power of the future?

Michelle Fulton's curator insight, June 17, 2014 8:20 PM

Some really interesting discussions could be held around this video-Geographically, Scientifically, Technologically, Environmentally, Creatively and Critically. 

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A Brief History of EdTech (Infographic)

A Brief History of EdTech (Infographic) | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
For the first time in our history, we see personalization of learning for each individual student as a reality. With new technologies growing at a breakneck pace, we’re excited to work with our schools to see what this decade will become.

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, January 30, 2014 10:12 PM

This infographic looks at both technology and education over the last four decades. Are there connections between these two themes? Take a look and see what was going on in the 1980's, 1990's, 2000's and today. This infographic provides geat depth in these two areas, noting that the:

* 1980's was the Age of Processing, the beginning of the Digital Age and a time when tech was a peripheral tool.

* 1990's was Hardware 2.0, the World Wide Web came into being and a time when tech begins to supplement.

* 2000's was the move to connectivity, to an age of sharing and portable devices and technology supplements instruction.

* Today - Perhaps this is yet to be written but a few years in we see multifunctional devices, personalization and technology as an integrated tool.

What would your students think of this chart? What conversation might arise in faculty meeting or with sharing this with the PTO or other stakeholders in your community? It does provide food for thought.

Intriguing Networks's curator insight, January 31, 2014 2:28 AM

how good to see it like this

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Cool Tools for 21st Century Learners: SAMR Through the Lens of the Common Core

Cool Tools for 21st Century Learners: SAMR Through the Lens of the Common Core | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

One of my goals is to weave digital tools into the Common Core to design flexible, student driven learning experiences that are Above the Line as defined by the SAMR model. While this might sound like a mouthful of EdTech, I assure you that combining all that is on our crowded plates is far better than tackling each individual initiative in isolation. This idea is supported by the Partnership for 21st Century Skills.


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A More Accurate World Map Wins Prestigious Japanese Design Award

A More Accurate World Map Wins Prestigious Japanese Design Award | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

"To design a map of the world is no easy task. Because maps represent the spherical Earth in 2D form, they cannot help but be distorted, which is why Greenland and Antarctica usually look far more gigantic than they really are, while Africa appears vastly smaller than its true size. The AuthaGraph World Map tries to correct these issues, showing the world closer to how it actually is in all its spherical glory."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 1, 2016 2:03 PM

This just shows how subjective the concept of "accurate" can be. First off, this is a fabulous map that nicely minimizes distortions (distance, direction, area, and shape) of the land on our planet. Any criticism of the map just shows the impossibility of making an accurate 2D map of a 3D Earth, but I still think that there is plenty of room to discuss the flaws/distortions that were chosen instead of others. It is interesting to note that a Japanese contest awarded this map with it's top honor (I doubt a Brazilian organization would feel the same way about this map). This map does make with some traditional cartographic conventions in its representation of Earth.  

 

Questions to Ponder: What are some elements of this map that are different from more traditional maps? This map claims to be more accurate; does that make it more useful?    

 

Tags: visualization, mapping, cartography, geospatial, technology.

Paula Weir's curator insight, November 15, 2016 9:13 AM
I like this 
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VIDEO: Saving the art of mapmaking

VIDEO: Saving the art of mapmaking | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

"If you're heading out on the road for your vacation this year, you'll probably get directions from a GPS or navigational system. Does that mean that the traditional map is a relic of the past? Mark Albert hits the road to find out."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 23, 2016 10:16 AM

This video is designed for a general news audience and it nicely shows the public how cartography is not rendered unimportant in the era of digital maps, but has become all the more useful.  I could see this video as useful resource to share with parents who are worried that studying geography won't lead to careers.  

 

Tags: GIS, video, mapping, cartography, geospatial, technology.

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It’s Crazy How Much Technology Is Changing the World of Work by Dave LeClair

It’s Crazy How Much Technology Is Changing the World of Work by Dave LeClair | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
by Dave LeClair

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32 Maps That Will Teach You Something New About the World

32 Maps That Will Teach You Something New About the World | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
Our world is a complex network of people, places and things. Here are 32 maps will teach you something new about our interconnected planet.

Via Seth Dixon
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's insight:

Some of these maps are more compellling than others (like all lists like this) but some are really telling.  The map above shows the dense concentration of tech corporate headquarters in Silicon Valley/San Francisco. 

 

Tags: technology, map, map archive. 

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Jodi Esaili's curator insight, April 4, 2016 9:28 AM

Some of these maps are more compellling than others (like all lists like this) but some are really telling.  The map above shows the dense concentration of tech corporate headquarters in Silicon Valley/San Francisco. 

 

Tags: technology, map, map archive. 

macellomedeiros's curator insight, April 4, 2016 10:18 AM

Some of these maps are more compellling than others (like all lists like this) but some are really telling.  The map above shows the dense concentration of tech corporate headquarters in Silicon Valley/San Francisco. 

 

Tags: technology, map, map archive. 

Lynne Stone's curator insight, August 30, 2016 8:08 PM
Everything posted by Seth Dixon really contributes to our understanding to the world.
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Reaching Mars in a few days? It's possible, NASA says #Mars #TheMartian

Reaching Mars in a few days? It's possible, NASA says #Mars #TheMartian | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

A new video released by the space agency discusses the possibility of speeding up our missions to other worlds by harnessing the power of lasers.


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John Edwards's curator insight, February 24, 2016 3:38 AM

Certainly exciting being able (in theory) to properly investigate future habitats for mankind.

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'Water Bubble' Could Be End of Plastic Bottles

'Water Bubble' Could Be End of Plastic Bottles | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
In this week's Swipe, the team meet the innovators competing to become Europe's best cleantech start-up.

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The case for engineering our food

Pamela Ronald studies the genes that make plants more resistant to disease and stress. In an eye-opening talk, she describes her decade-long quest to help create a variety of rice that can survive prolonged flooding. She shows how the genetic improvement of seeds saved the Hawaiian papaya crop in the 1950s — and makes the case that it may simply be the most effective way to enhance food security for our planet’s growing population.

 

Tags: GMOs, technology, agriculture.


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Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:57 PM

Pamela Ronald studies the genes that make plants more resistant to disease and stress. In an eye-opening talk, she describes her decade-long quest to help create a variety of rice that can survive prolonged flooding. She shows how the genetic improvement of seeds saved the Hawaiian papaya crop in the 1950s — and makes the case that it may simply be the most effective way to enhance food security for our planet’s growing population.

Jill Wallace's curator insight, May 30, 2015 9:38 PM

Agriculture

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 1, 2015 9:44 AM

unit 5

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The bizarre history of cellphone towers disguised as trees

The bizarre history of cellphone towers disguised as trees | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
They're tall. They're totally absurd. And they're everywhere.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 24, 2015 12:28 PM

While I'll admit that most of these cell towers aren't fooling anyone that they are actually blending into the local landscape and ecosystem, there is a reason that we work to conceal elements of modern infrastructure that are considered unsightly. 


Tags: infrastructure, technology, landscape.

LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, May 4, 2015 9:27 AM

And they are emitting vast amounts of electrosmog! What would happen to our society (civilization?) if all these electro-magnetic field emitting technologies would be seen to be more destructive to our health than we are led to believe?

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The Legacy of Canals

The Legacy of Canals | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

"The historical geography of Erie Canal reshaped a nation."


Via Seth Dixon
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's insight:

Actually George Washington was interested in canals and the C and O and other canals in the area flourished for a time.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 28, 2014 8:54 AM

Back in the early 1800s, New York was one of the three biggest cities in the United States, but what led to it's surge past Philadelphia and Boston?  Geography and new technological innovations that favored New York City's relative location.   NYC was the only city on the East coast that could access the Great Lakes via canal, and after the construction of the Erie Canal, NYC has always been the preeminent city in the USA.  

TagsNYC, transportation, industry, economic, globalization, technology.

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The Future of Web and Technology [Infographic]

The Future of Web and Technology [Infographic] | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

Infographic on The Future of Web and Technology describes on the trending products and innovations growing rapidly year by year. Augmented reality and its products being the core of advanced technologies in the future. Google glass, augmented reality based wearable gadgets, 3d printers, cloud computing, educational technology, leap motion, another AR product Oculus Rift, AR contact lenses, agent smartwatch and related gadgets, all contribute to the web and technology.


Via Lauren Moss, Alfonso Gonzalez
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Triangle Software's curator insight, July 6, 2014 7:44 AM

With so many technology innovations being developed and implemented - what do you see as the next innovation for your industry?

Jeremy Cooke's curator insight, July 16, 2014 7:05 AM

Another interesting area for games and generesal digital creativity.. now where did I put that Bamzooki ?

 

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Imagine your robot today. Design one tomorrow.

With an open source robot design for 3-D printers, discover how Intel's 21st Century Robot program hopes to increase the growth rate, diversity, and utility of robots by allowing anyone to create and program their own robot.


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