STEM Connections
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STEM Connections
Science, technology, engineering and math in K-12
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Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from U.S HISTORY SHACK : MIKE BUSARELLO
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The United Countries of Baseball Map

The United Countries of Baseball Map | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

This is the new and improved version of the familiar map can teach regions (formal, functional, vernacular) as well as the importance on TV markets as a diffusion mechanism for culture.  As mentioned by Andy Baker, "This map is also useful for showcasing 'threshold' and 'range' from 'Central Place Theory.' For instance, I ask my students, 'Why are the Mid-Atlantic & California coasts boundaries (range) so small compared to Great Plains teams?'"  Great idea Andy!


Via Seth Dixon, Michael Miller, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
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ASeagrave's comment, January 30, 2012 2:14 PM
It's crazy how obsessed the eastern side of the country is with baseball, but how oblivious and uninterested the western side is.
LMullen's comment, February 2, 2012 5:17 PM
I'd like to see a sales map with this because even thoug the Yankees and Redsox regions are much smaller than the Atlanta Braves or Texas Rangers, they pobably sell MUCH more.
Flo Cuadra Scrofft's curator insight, March 24, 2015 7:57 PM

Although short, I had to dive into the set of webpages that the article presented. it did not give a whole lot of information about the map, but the previous scooper of this article gave a very interesting hindsight on the map. This Baseball map shows the importance of TV markets as a diffusion mechanism for culture. Each of the regions of this map have been classified according to the national Baseball team people from the regions support.

Reflection- not only geographers define regions, but also popular trends and statistics. As well as the last scooper said, it is interesting to note that the Mid-Atlantic and California coasts boundaries between each region is very small compared to Great Plains regions. It is also interesting the fact that the regions include, sometimes, more than just one state, and in other cases, two or more teams exist within one state, such as Texas.

Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Geography Education
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A Map of Baseball Nation

A Map of Baseball Nation | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

"Fans may not list which team they favor on the census, but millions of them do make their preferences public on Facebook. Using aggregated data provided by the company, we were able to create an unprecedented look at the geography of baseball fandom, going down not only to the county level, as Facebook did in a nationwide map it released a few weeks ago, but also to ZIP codes."


Via Seth Dixon
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Greg Russak's curator insight, April 29, 2014 12:53 PM

Maps and baseball - a good combination!

Wyatt Wolf's curator insight, October 30, 2014 7:46 PM

My favorite baseball team is the Philadelphia Phillies, here's everyone else's.

Global Speechwriter's comment, November 4, 2014 2:52 AM
Jays? C'mon.
Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Geography Education
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Geographic Influences of Skating

"Dogtown and Z-Boys: A documentary about the pioneering 1970s Zephyr skating team."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 9, 2014 1:53 PM

Popular culture is shaped by taste-makers, counter-cultural movements, and the blending of cultural practices in new ways creating a distinct aesthetic. Often, the physical geography of a region plays a crucial role in shaping the cultural practices particular to their environment. All of that can be seen quite vividly in the colorful skating revolution of the 1970s that took shape in the Southern California. Kids who grew up idolizing surfers branched out their recreational habits into the modern form of skating that we see today at the X Games. Made legendary through a series of Skateboarder magazine articles, these kids shaped the cultural ethos of skateboarding for over a generation. With the coastal influence of surfing, the socioeconomics of a seaside slum, it’s abandoned piers, the ubiquity of cement and asphalt in the urban landscape, the run-down neighborhood of “Dogtown” was home to cultural movement. The fierce droughts of the 1970 meant abandoned swimming pools; that drought led surfers to the technological infrastructure for modern skating ramps and half pipes as they skated in emptied swimming pools. As stated in those Skaterboarder articles, “two hundred years of American technology has unwittingly created a massive cement playground of unlimited potential. But it was the minds of 11 year olds that could see that potential.” The documentary “Dogtown and Z-Boys” (trailer) and the fictionalized “Lords of Dogtown,” (trailer) both produced by skater turned filmmaker Stacy Peralta, chronicle the age (“Lords of Dogtown” is not appropriate for the K-12 classroom viewing).


Tags: place, spacesport, California, landscapevideo, popular culture, music.

Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Geography Education
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Geography of Soccer in the US

Geography of Soccer in the US | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

" 549 players from 62 different countries play in MLS in the United States"


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Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 8, 2013 11:40 PM

Perfect example of cultural diffusion.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 3:59 AM

I am a huge soccer fan and with that i also have to say i tend to neglect the MLS due to its lack of talent. The problem in the past with the MLS was that it was too home grown and their wasnt many international players to provide a wider demographic in the leauge which also means worse players. But with the MLS signing some big names from around the world such as Henry from France Beckham from Uk and Cahill from the AU the MLS is growing in popularity around the world and is soon to be a globally viewed leauge. This is a map of where the nearly 600 MLS players come from and it goes to show the more nations you can represent the bigger crowd demographic you can draw in.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 19, 2014 5:25 PM

There are 35 MLS players that came from Africa according to the article. In America soccer or football in Europe is not that popular it is more like our baseball or football then like the soccer over there. (That is their "past time") In America we have a large population that play sports but specifically soccer we do not have that many participants that involve themselves in this , I think part of the reason is that abroad soccer is so important to them and they try to flourish from that sport onto tournments and other MLS players go for the cup. Oppose to America and our excitment about the NFL and MBL.