STEM Connections
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STEM Connections
Science, technology, engineering and math in K-12
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Who wields the knife? | #Robotics #Surgery #Medicine #Research 

Who wields the knife? | #Robotics #Surgery #Medicine #Research  | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
THEY don’t drink, they don’t get tired and they don’t go on strike. To hospital managers, the idea of robots operating on patients without human intervention is an attractive one. To patients, though, the crucial question is, “are they better than human surgeons?” Surgery is messy and complicated. A routine operation can become life-threatening in minutes.

Such considerations have meant that the role of robots in operating theatres has been limited until now to being little more than motorised, precision tools for surgeons to deploy—a far cry from the smart surgical pods and “med-bays” of science fiction. But a paper published this week in Science Translational Medicine, by Peter Kim of the Children’s National Health System in Washington, DC, and his colleagues, brings the idea of real robot surgeons, operating under only the lightest of human supervision, a step closer. Though not yet let loose on people, it has successfully stitched up the intestines of piglets.

 


Via Gust MEES, Stephania Savva
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Gust MEES's curator insight, May 7, 7:39 PM

THEY don’t drink, they don’t get tired and they don’t go on strike. To hospital managers, the idea of robots operating on patients without human intervention is an attractive one. To patients, though, the crucial question is, “are they better than human surgeons?” Surgery is messy and complicated. A routine operation can become life-threatening in minutes.

Such considerations have meant that the role of robots in operating theatres has been limited until now to being little more than motorised, precision tools for surgeons to deploy—a far cry from the smart surgical pods and “med-bays” of science fiction. But a paper published this week in Science Translational Medicine, by Peter Kim of the Children’s National Health System in Washington, DC, and his colleagues, brings the idea of real robot surgeons, operating under only the lightest of human supervision, a step closer. Though not yet let loose on people, it has successfully stitched up the intestines of piglets.

 

Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from 21st Century Innovative Technologies and Developments as also discoveries, curiosity ( insolite)...
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Functional human heart tissue grown from skin cells | Research

Functional human heart tissue grown from skin cells | Research | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
The need for heart transplants will always exceed the number of donor hearts available for transplant. Thanks to research just out from Massachusetts General Hospital, though, this may not continue to be a problem for much longer. Researchers there have just succeeded in growing fully contractile heart tissue by recellularizing a collagen scaffold, and they’re hoping to refine the method so that it can be used as a “functional myocardial patch” for cardiac injuries.

Via Gust MEES
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's insight:

The need for heart transplants will always exceed the number of donor hearts available for transplant. Thanks to research just out from Massachusetts General Hospital, though, this may not continue to be a problem for much longer. Researchers there have just succeeded in growing fully contractile heart tissue by recellularizing a collagen scaffold, and they’re hoping to refine the method so that it can be used as a “functional myocardial patch” for cardiac injuries.

 

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Gust MEES's curator insight, March 15, 2:18 PM

The need for heart transplants will always exceed the number of donor hearts available for transplant. Thanks to research just out from Massachusetts General Hospital, though, this may not continue to be a problem for much longer. Researchers there have just succeeded in growing fully contractile heart tissue by recellularizing a collagen scaffold, and they’re hoping to refine the method so that it can be used as a “functional myocardial patch” for cardiac injuries.

 

Fernando de la Cruz Naranjo Grisales's curator insight, March 16, 7:20 AM

The need for heart transplants will always exceed the number of donor hearts available for transplant. Thanks to research just out from Massachusetts General Hospital, though, this may not continue to be a problem for much longer. Researchers there have just succeeded in growing fully contractile heart tissue by recellularizing a collagen scaffold, and they’re hoping to refine the method so that it can be used as a “functional myocardial patch” for cardiac injuries.

 

Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Linking Literacy & Learning: Research, Reflection, and Practice
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This Is Your Brain On Games - InformED

This Is Your Brain On Games - InformED | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

"The past year has illuminated many things about the way the brain works, including how it responds to games. It is now erroneous to conflate ten hours of Super Mario with minor head trauma. We know that you won’t go blind if you’re looking for coins and bananas and rings on a screen all day. Your motivation and attention span will remain intact no matter what level you reach in Skyrim. In fact, the very latest science is telling us the exact opposite of what we thought all along: video games actually increase brain function."


Via Beth Dichter, Dean J. Fusto
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, January 29, 2015 9:35 PM

Brain research now shows that action video games impact "brain plasticity, learning, attention, and vision." What does this mean? That video games may make the brain bigger, as in increasing brain volume.

Along with information on how video games may make the brain "bigger, better, faster, stronger" the post also shares information on "using the neuroscience of games to boost learning" and "how to ditch your biases."

A number of studies are quoted in the post with links to additional information.

luc taesch's curator insight, February 7, 2015 6:23 AM

game your biais away ! #antifragile #agile

Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Technology in Today's Classroom
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The Power of the Educational Infographic

The Power of the Educational Infographic | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

Via Beth Dichter, Tracy Shaw, John Purificati
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, October 12, 2013 3:48 PM

Have you had people ask you why you choose to use infographics in your classroom? This presentation is by Mia MacMeekin, who has created many great infographics (some of which have been posted on this Sccop.it). The best way to access this is in PDF format. This file is quite large so here is a direct link to it: http://anethicalisland.files.wordpress.com/2013/10/rscon-presentation-22.pdf

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Science.gov: USA.gov for Science - Government Science Portal

Science.gov: USA.gov for Science - Government Science Portal | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
Science.gov is a gateway to government science information provided by U.S. Government science agencies, including research and development results.
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Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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The importance of Visual Mathematics


Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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medalgecko's comment, April 30, 2:04 AM
Fabulous

Really good
Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Education and Tech Tools
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How to use ‘app smashing’ for research, building, and collaboration

How to use ‘app smashing’ for research, building, and collaboration | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
Having completed the wondrous Romeo and Juliet text for Grade 9, the time had come to investigate the deeper intricacies of Shakespeare’s wonderful work!

Via Becky Roehrs
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Becky Roehrs's curator insight, March 14, 2015 9:08 PM

What Apps did they use for their App Smashing?

 BlipparSocrative, and Padlet

Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Technology in Today's Classroom
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12 Good Research and Citation Tools for Students

12 Good Research and Citation Tools for Students | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , John Purificati
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Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Into the Driver's Seat
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How To Organize Your Research With The Power Of Google Drive

How To Organize Your Research With The Power Of Google Drive | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
Google Docs has made its home on Google Drive. So after one year, it’s high time to get used to calling it by the new account name.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Petra Pollum, camaher, kathymcdonough, Katie Frank, Jim Lerman
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's insight:

Thanks Jim!

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María Asunción Martínez Mayoral's curator insight, September 9, 2013 5:58 PM

Google no deja de sorprender; interesantes herramientas para investigación dentro de Google drive.

María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, December 14, 2013 1:55 PM

Amazing

Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from 21st Century STEM Resources
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"How To Do Research" Game

"How To Do Research" Game | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
"How To Do Research" game is presented by Kentucky Virtual Library. It's designed for kids to learn how to do research independently with kids-friendly user experience. Did you know that you can ac...

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.
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Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, February 24, 2014 12:37 PM

A Game for the children :)

Lotte Schacht's curator insight, September 14, 2014 7:09 AM

Great stuff.

larcher's curator insight, October 19, 2014 11:07 AM

ajouter votre point de vue ...