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Science, technology, engineering and math in K-12
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Non-Native American Nations Control over North America

Non-Native American Nations Control over North America | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
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God Is.'s comment, April 5, 11:50 PM
With all due respect. Are we trying to corroborate that because we have been a colonialist nation, now we need someone to help us pay the price? or am I totally assuming wrong here...
Alex Lewis's curator insight, April 6, 10:00 AM

This animated photo shows the progression of the different nations in control of North America. The development of the U.S. is also depicted on here, as they went from mostly European control to independence. While the U.S. controlled most of what is now America, you can recognize the Civil War period by the control of Confederate States. 

 

                                        -A.L.

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, April 8, 1:33 PM

Wow. As a history major, I found this map timeline really interesting and really cool. It's a great example of how even though the physical geography of a place can remain the same, its political and economic geography can change so rapidly (or not so rapidly). It was especially interesting to see the brief stints that entities such as the Republic of the Rio Grande or the Confederate States of America did in the dividing up of North America over the last two and a half centuries. For someone who knows nothing about U.S. history, those blips on the radar beg the question, "what happened there?" How can a political entity encompass a geographic region and then disappear just as quickly?

 

And that ties into what I think this map is really about: colonialism. This map says a great deal about how European (or Western) empires carved up the New World and what some of their political or economic goals were in the times that the map shows. It's also important to note the title of the map: "Non-Native American Nations Control over North America". So as we see the map changing to show European or United States expansion, what we DON'T see is the gradual loss of land experienced by the various Native American tribes that inhabited the continent long before Europeans ever laid eyes on it. This map, therefore, highlights how political and economic geography can change so drastically when groups with a lot of economic, political, and military power are at odds with groups who are severely disadvantaged in these areas. 

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How Google represents disputed borders between countries

How Google represents disputed borders between countries | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
INTERNATIONAL borders are often tricky to chart on maps. Tangible topographic features can be pinned down by satellite imagery but the boundaries between many states...

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Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, September 5, 2014 9:10 AM

How does politics affect map-making? 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 8, 2014 12:36 PM

unit 4

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 13, 2014 3:17 PM

Google is always a step ahead of any other online page so it is not surprising that Google have some countries in dispute because they can see people can see the political status of a country in Google map but that might change the way we see and think about Google and countries with dispute. Google or the Internet will always be a good help for people to be able see what is happening between country's borders.

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How Many Countries Are There?


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Heather Ramsey's curator insight, November 3, 2013 8:12 PM

This is one of those frequently asked questions in Geography class that sometimes results in increased confusion. The maker of this video has summed it up nicely.

Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 8, 2013 2:44 AM

What makes a country a country is if they play by the rules, of other soverin nations on a global scale and follow the rules. Most countries recieve taxes from their citizens, have a military and a recognized as a soverin. Not every body of land is a country but are also properties controlled by other countries. There are countries in the South Pacific. In North, South America, Europe, and Asia, and bevcause of politcal geopgrahpy nations sizes are changing often and new countries are usually created from theis process

 

Mrs. B's curator insight, February 15, 2014 9:44 AM

193....except........

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Rise and Fall of the Ottoman Empire

Rise and Fall of the Ottoman Empire | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

"Animated GIF map chronicling the rise and fall of the Ottoman Empire." 

 

Tags: empire, devolution, Middle East, borders, historical, map.


Via Seth Dixon
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Claudia Patricia Parra's curator insight, April 3, 9:48 AM

añada su visión ...

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 7, 9:08 PM

It was amazing to see the start of the Ottoman empire and the rise over a couple of hundred years.  Then you see the green recede and its amazing it shrinks down to nothing.  All you have left is Turkey.  Once a prosperous empire, it no longer exists.  

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 12:25 PM

This GIF map was particularly interesting to me as a history major and as someone who strongly believes in the importance of incorporating geography into history whenever possible. Though my knowledge about the Ottoman Empire is admittedly lacking, it was still interesting to see the changes that occurred in the empire's borders over six centuries. Some time frames saw significant land gains, others significant losses, and still others small shifts. Someone more well-versed in the history of the Ottoman Empire than I would be able to tell exactly what these changes coincided with, but I knew that the timeline would end shortly after WWI, since that was the undoing of many European/Eurasian empires, including the Ottomans. 

 

What this map best illustrates is the fluidity of borders. Here is an empire that existed for more than 600 years, and its borders changed numerous times throughout its history. While this likely occurred as a result of armed conflict, it is still a major change. Often, people think of borders as concrete and unmoving. This is not the case at all, as borders can shift due to war, treaties, or even natural, geographical change. A GIF map like this is useful and interesting because it shows easily and chronologically the change in borders of a particular nation or empire over the course of its history. Furthermore, it allows the viewer to ponder the implications of the border shifts and how they would have affected politics, economics, and culture at the time. 

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40 Maps That Explain The Middle East

40 Maps That Explain The Middle East | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
These maps are crucial for understanding the region's history, its present, and some of the most important stories there today.

Via Seth Dixon, Henk Trimp
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Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, February 9, 9:26 AM

Seth Dixon - the teacher that sent this article at the first place - assess a very sound comment about the use of maps as tools of comprehenssion of the real world. I love maps, but can t avoid to be worried about what he is saying, so I recommend a thougthful reading of his statements.

(Seth Dixon - el profesor que envió este artículo en primer lugar - hace un profundo comentario acerca del empleo de mapas como herramietas de comprensión del mundo real. Yo amo los mapas, pero no puedo evitar preocuparme por lo que (Dixon) señala, así que recomiendo una reflexiva lectura de sus planteamientos.)  

David Lizotte's curator insight, March 11, 4:44 PM

This was an excellent portrayal of the middle east. The using of maps accompanied by side paragraphs explains the long history which is necessary to know if one is to understand its current status. When learning about different realms and regions (that existed throughout history) I always find it on a map. In order to truly understand a certain empire, one must know its geographical setting and its significance. It helps me better understand the region. These maps, specifically the ones that are changing through the domains reign, are extremely helpful in better comprehending the misunderstood middle eastern region. This website also creates more thought. If a particular map captivates the reader they can do more research on the topic. However, the "slides" do stand alone portraying much knowledge to a wide variety of specific elements that are still ongoing. The grouping of the slides by region/conflict/country was also an excellent strategy. It shows organization which in turn develops an easier learning process. 

The initial map educates many people of how what is modern day Iraq used to be an Oasis. However, over time, due to over farming and soil erosion the landscape changed to dry/desert territory. 

The maps displaying the rise of Islam and its transitioning into the Ottoman Empire give a great perspective as to the amount of land it covered. The Islamic world thrived and was very advanced in there culture in regards to medicine and arithmetic. The shear size of the empires should increase ones respect of the Islamic theatre. What many people are not aware of is how the Ottoman Empire was knocking on the door of the Holy Roman Empire during the sixteenth century. This was quite an advancement of territory crossing through much of eastern Europe ending as far west as Vienna. A lot of what is Eastern Europe today was part of the Ottoman Empire, including Greece. 

Another excellent map that contributes to the better understanding of western involvement can be seen in the carving up of the Ottoman Empire post WWI. Colonialism was very much present throughout less developed regions so the carving up of the middle east was not an exotic concept to the victorious west. Territories/countries were created and ethnic groups dominated one another. Its certainly true a western presence has contributed to prior and existing issues throughout the middle East.

 

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, March 15, 8:47 PM

It is interesting to see the same trends over and over again.  These maps are a great tool to show the history of the area, as well as the history of religion and political views.  I appreciate the information provided since the Middle East has undergone the most transitions (going all the way back to Mesopotamia) and its history can be confusing.