STEM Connections
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STEM Connections
Science, technology, engineering and math in K-12
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Mapping Your State

Mapping Your State | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
Students research political, physical, and cultural features of their own state or district and work collaboratively to create a state tourism map.
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What should you include when you map your state?
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NOAA's GFS model visualized on NOAA’s Science on a Sphere

NOAA's powerful Global Forecast System model was upgraded on May 11, 2016, providing forecasters with a more accurate 4-D picture of how a weather system will evolve. The upgrade is the latest of a number of model improvements rolling out this spring and summer, thanks to increased supercomputing power NOAA acquired earlier this year.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 12, 1:28 PM

There's some good science with practical applications underneath this very artistic rendering of the planet's atmosphere...it is more fluvial than we give it credit for if we only think of air as empty space.  This video also reminds me of the words of one pilot and his perspective on both the atmosphere and Earth from above: "Geographically speaking, the sky is like a whole other planet encasing our own."

 

Tags: atmosphere, space, video, physical, fluvial.

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America’s year without a winter: The 2015-2016 season was the warmest on record

America’s year without a winter: The 2015-2016 season was the warmest on record | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
Every state but two were warmer than normal and all six New England states set winter records.

 

 

Tags: physical, weather and climate, climate change.


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The field guide, rebooted

The field guide, rebooted | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

"Map of Life joins a small but growing number of mobile applications seeking to reimagine the field guide by combining big data and mobile technology. Following in the footsteps of iNaturalist, a standard-bearer for natural history mobile applications, it allows users to instantly contribute their own geolocated, time-stamped species observations." 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 19, 2015 6:04 PM

The network of geographic alliances will be working on a BioBlitz national initiative in 2016. This article highlights two mobile apps that will enable users to use their smartphones to explore and archive the natural world around them and run an awesome BioBlitz. 

 

Tags: National Geographicphysical, biogeography, environment, edtech.

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Tsunami Animation

"The largest earthquake ever recorded by instruments struck southern Chile on May 22, 1960. This 9.5 magnitude earthquake generated a tsunami that crossed the Pacific Ocean, killing as many as 2000 people in Chile and Peru, 61 people in Hilo, Hawaii, and 142 people in Japan as well as causing damage in the Marquesas Islands (Fr. Polynesia), Samoa, New Zealand, Australia, the Philippines, and in Alaska's Aleutian Islands.  To see how this tsunami compares with two recent tsunamis from Chile, please watch http://youtu.be/qoxTC3vIF1U "

 

Tags: physical, geomorphology, water, tectonics, disasters, video.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 24, 2015 8:19 AM

In 1700, Japan was hit by a tsunami; they knew that tsunamis were caused by earthquakes, but there was no earthquake of that magnitude in Japan that could have caused it.  They called it the Orphan Tsunami, and it puzzled everyone.  Centuries later, data confirmed that a massive earthquake in the Pacific Northwest occurred in 1700 and it's tsunami traveled across the ocean much like the this computer simulation of the 1960 Chile earthquake.   

Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, September 24, 2015 9:23 PM

Tsunami ocurrido en Chile el 22 de Mayo de 1960 donde murieron 2000 personas en Chile y Perú, 61 en Hilo Hawaii, 142 en Japón causando daños en Islas Marquesas Polinesia , Samoa, Nueva Zelanda, Australia, Filipinas, Alaska's Islas Aleutianas.....enlace para ver la comparación con el Tsunamis recientes en Chile (2015)

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Plate Tectonics and the Formation of Central America and the Caribbean

This animation is made from a time series of maps reconstructing the movements of continental crust or blocks, as South America pulled away from North America, starting 170 million years ago. Note that South America is still clinging to Africa at the beginning of the series.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 22, 2015 4:37 PM

The land bridge connecting North and South America is hardly permanent (on a geological time scale that is).  This video is an animated version of the still maps from this article.  


Tags: Mexico, tectonicsphysical, video, Middle America.

Sameer Mohamed's curator insight, May 27, 2015 8:54 AM

The intriguing thing about this video is that it puts into perspective the amount of time that humans have been on this earth. In in less than a million years we have gone from not existing to shaping the ground that we walk on.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:46 AM

Summer reading KQ1

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Motion of Tectonic Plates

"This video is from the BBC documentary film Earth: The Power Of The Planet.  The clip is also embedded in this story map that tells the tale of Earth’s tectonic plates, their secret conspiracies, awe-inspiring exhibitions and subtle impacts on the maps and geospatial information we so often take for granted as unambiguous."

 

Tags: physical, tectonics, disasters, mapping, geospatial, mapping, video, ESRI.


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Journey to the Center of the Earth

Journey to the Center of the Earth | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

"How far would you have to travel to reach the Earth’s core? And what would you see along the way? Use this BBC interactive to dig into the truth. (BBC).  Download the National Geographic Education high-resolution illustration of Earth’s interior."


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Melissa Marshall's curator insight, April 30, 2015 8:17 PM

Interactive that would be great for Year 7 and 8 Science next term - moving through the layers of the Earth!

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If all the Ice melted: National Geographic's Interactive map on Rising Seas

If all the Ice melted: National Geographic's Interactive map on Rising Seas | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

What if all the ice melted in the world? Now whether you believe global warming happens because of human activities or naturally is another debate. The questions “How would the world look if ALL the ice melted?” How much would the sea rise by? What would be the average temperature on Earth? are of interest to everyone.

Trust National Geographic not only to capture such questions in the best manner possible but also to visualize it in such geoawesome manner! Here’s the super interesting map by National Geographic “IF ALL THE ICE MELTED“!

 

Tags: physical, weather and climate, National Geographic, climate change, water, visualization.


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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, April 5, 2015 9:05 AM

Climate change is all about the "Pendulum Effect," where the extremes is what matters, not so much the median or average. The average may fluctuate some, but the real problem comes when the weather goes haywire. Too much water can be as destructive as too little water, and this doesn't only happen in time but in space as well, where regions get too much of one and too little of the other. We'll see strips of drought and strips of wetness, strips of cold and strips of heat, like bands across regions and across the planet. If he ice melts, the sea and fresh water strips in the ocean will keep the fresh water atop and it'll probably freeze in great bands in winter and provoke an extreme albedo effect cooling down the planet radically followed immediately by a potential mini ice age.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, April 5, 2015 9:23 PM

Impact of climate change on landforms and landscapes 


The human causes and effects of landscape degradation (ACHGK051)

The ways of protecting significant landscapes (ACHGK052)



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Volcanic Eruption

"WebCams de Mexico archives the best of webcam videos in Mexico."


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Mr Inniss's curator insight, March 20, 2015 9:28 AM

watch an eruption in action

Paul Farias's curator insight, April 9, 2015 12:43 PM

It almost reminds me of a blemish that needs to be tended to on the face of the earth and it just couldn't handle the pressure anymore. My fascination with the way the earth does things blows my mind. 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, September 22, 2015 8:20 AM

Their is nothing on earth more amazing and terrifying than a volcanic eruption. As mentioned in class, Mexico has a number of active volcanos. The most troubling one is the volcano near Mexico City. An Eruption of that volcano would spell doom for portions of Mexico City, and a wider doom for the whole nation. As a primate city, destruction in Mexico City would be devastating to the overall health of the Mexican economy. We can only hope that Mexico will be prepared to deal with the ramifications of such an eruption.

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Dramatic Confluences

Dramatic Confluences | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

"Confluences occur wherever two streams come together. If the gradient is low (i.e., nearly level) and the properties of the two streams are very different, the confluences may be characterized by a dramatic visible distinction as the mixing occurs only slowly."

 

Tags:  physical, fluvial, geomorphology, erosion, landscape.


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Sylvain Rotillon's curator insight, January 7, 2015 5:47 AM

Wonderful pictures of rivers confluences

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How One Woman's Discovery Shook the Foundations of Geology

How One Woman's Discovery Shook the Foundations of Geology | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
Without ever setting sail, Marie Tharp mapped the ocean floor and made a discovery that shook the foundations of geology. So why did the giants of her field dismiss her findings as “girl talk"?

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Prof. Hankell's curator insight, December 19, 2014 9:27 AM

Marie Tharp v Experts...

Marianne Naughton's curator insight, December 20, 2014 11:32 AM

Marie's Ocean Discoveries ...  

Allan Tsuda's curator insight, December 21, 2014 7:12 PM

Not EdTech but great story. Embarrased I had never heard of Marie Tharp until now.

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Visualizing Earth's Physical Systems

Visualizing Earth's Physical Systems | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

"An animated map of global wind and weather. Join the Facebook community.  Seen here are the dual menaces, Cyclone Hudhud and Typhoon Vongfong."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 7, 2014 2:18 PM

Earlier I shared a dynamic map of near-live wind data for the United States and a static rendering of global wind patterns.  This combines the features of both of those resources to provide a mesmerizing digital globe.  This visualization of global weather conditions is updated every three hours from supercomputer data projections.  Click on the 'earth' text in the lower left-hand corner to customize the display.  For examining the wind patterns and oceans currents, this is much more useful than Google Earth; this is definitely one of my favorite resources.


Tagsphysical, weather and climate, mapping, visualization.

Pam Anderson's curator insight, October 12, 2014 11:48 AM

this might interest some of our teachers who are studying weather With their students.  I just think this site is fascinating!

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How Geospatial Analytics Are Changing Habitat Conservation

"The BirdReturns program is an effort to provide 'pop-up habitats' for some of the millions of shorebirds, such as sandpipers and plovers that migrate along the Pacific Flyway, a route that spans from Alaska to South America. Birds flying on this journey seek out the increasingly rare wetlands teeming with tasty insects to fuel their long-distance flights.  Over the last century, California's Central Valley has lost 95% of the wetlands habitat to development, agriculture, and other land use changes. As a solution, scientists use big data, binoculars, and rice paddies."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 17, 4:35 PM

This project combines data from satellite imagery to map surface water in California's Central Valley, and individual bird observations to select locations that can be temporarily converted into wetlands to aid the migratory birds (for more information than the video provides about this project, read this article). 

 

This is a great example of using both 'big' geospatial data as represented by the satellite imagery and combining it with field data and actual observations to make the world a better place.  We need more decision makers that can think spatially and use geographic skills.  

 

Tags: physicalCalifornia, water, environmentbiogeography, remote sensing.

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Meander? I ‘ardly know ‘er!

Meander? I ‘ardly know ‘er! | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 15, 3:27 PM

This is brilliant.  I can't say how much I love this. 

 

Tagsphysical, fluvial, geomorphology, landscape, funart.

YEC Geo's curator insight, April 28, 9:08 AM
Love geomorphology comics.
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Thousands of Earthquakes Recorded in Puget Sound in Just Two Weeks

Thousands of Earthquakes Recorded in Puget Sound in Just Two Weeks | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
Residents can't feel most of them, but there have been a lot of earthquakes in Puget Sound lately.

 

Tags: disasters, physical, tectonics.


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Wind Forecast

Wind Forecast | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
Ubercool wind animation all over the world. Wind and weather forecast for kiters, surfers, pilots and anyone else.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 1, 2015 3:23 PM

With people on the East Coast concerned about the possible trajectories for Hurricane Joaquin, I think it is the right time to share this interactive map.  In the past I shared a dynamic map of near-live wind data for the United States and a mesmerizing digital globe with wind data.  This new one though, includes multiple meteorological layers with forecasts for the next two weeks...very cool.     

Tagsphysical, weather and climate, mapping, visualization.

Diane Johnson's curator insight, October 19, 2015 9:45 PM

Useful for examining wind power in various areas.

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Ring of Fire

Ring of Fire | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
The Ring of Fire is a string of volcanoes and sites of seismic activity, or earthquakes, around the edges of the Pacific Ocean.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 15, 2015 12:20 PM

The Ring of Fire is a series of plate boundaries where earthquakes and volcanic activity are commonplace.  Surrounding the edge of the Pacific Ocean, the Ring of Fire consists of a string of 452 volcanoes.


Tags physical, tectonics, disasters, K12.

Loreto Vargas's curator insight, July 2, 2015 10:07 AM

“El Anillo de Fuego” es una cadena de volcanes y lugares de actividad sísmica, o temblores, alrededor de los límites del Océano Pacífico.

“L’Anneau de Feu” c’est une chaine de volcans et de sites d’activité sismique, ou tremblements de terre, autour de limites de l’Océan Pacifique.

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, August 6, 2015 3:54 PM

The Ring of Fire is a series of plate boundaries where earthquakes and volcanic activity are commonplace.  Surrounding the edge of the Pacific Ocean, the Ring of Fire consists of a string of 452 volcanoes.

 

Tags: physical, tectonics, disasters, K12.

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The Anatomy of a Tornado

Jim Cantore gives an INCREDIBLE step-by-step description and 3D view into how a tornado forms - like you've never seen before!

 

Tags: physical, weather and climate, visualization.


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Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, May 22, 2015 7:37 PM

JIM CANTORE MUESTRA PASO A PASO EL DESARROLLO DE UN TORNADO EN 3D

Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 24, 2015 2:41 PM

This amazing video shows everything from funnel clouds and weak tornadoes to F5, tornadoes which cause major damage. It explains how a tornado originates from a super cell (rotating thunderstorm) to how it forms from a rear flank downdraft. 

When identifying the formation of a tornado and the direction in which it will be heading, satellite imagery and aerial photography are needed for accurate data.

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Nepal earthquake: Hundreds die, many feared trapped

Nepal earthquake: Hundreds die, many feared trapped | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
At least 970 people have died as Nepal suffered its worst earthquake for more than 80 years, with deaths also reported in India, Tibet and Bangladesh.

 

Tags: Nepal, disasters, physical, tectonics.


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Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 18, 2015 12:48 PM

We have learned that the Himalayas are growing everyday while our Appalachians in the united states are shrinking. What does this all mean? In the platonic spectrum it means in Nepal, earthquakes.

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Five Things The Gulf Oil Spill Has Taught Us About the Ocean

Five Things The Gulf Oil Spill Has Taught Us About the Ocean | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

"The Deepwater Horizon spill in 2010 is the largest accidental marine spill in U.S. history: these are the pivotal discoveries scientists and environmentalists have learned from researching it.  While researching the spill, scientists tracked deep-sea sharks, found new mud dragons, and discovered a new type of ocean current."

 

Tags: water, conservation, physical, biogeography, environment, pollution, resources.


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Beatrice J. P. Vasconcelos's curator insight, April 21, 2015 9:43 AM

Olha o tamanho da bobagem...

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Protecting an Ocean at Risk

"Pristine Seas is an exploration, research, and media project to find, survey, and help protect the last wild places in the ocean. These pristine places are unknown by all but long-distance fishing fleets, which have started to encroach on them. It is essential that we let the world know that these places exist, that they are threatened, and that they deserve to be protected.  Learn more about Pristine Seas here: http://ocean.nationalgeographic.com/ocean/explore/pristine-seas/ "


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 12, 2015 12:35 PM

I was enchanted hearing Enriq Sala discuss his passion for ocean biodiversity and purity.  This passion, combined with scientific exploration and political advocacy is the backbone of a National Geographic's Pristine Seas project.  Here is one news story about the Seychelles, and how they are trying to manage their fishing industries to promote sustainability and hopefully the Pristine Seas project will lead to greater awareness of the need for ocean conservation. 


Tags: water, conservation, National Geographicphysical, biogeography, environmentpollution, resources.

Emily Coats's curator insight, March 24, 2015 12:41 PM

INDUSTRIALIZATION 

Fishing and Urban Development have detrimentally destroyed our oceans, and we have polluted the seas at such a high level. Urban growth and over fishing have caused our oceans to be polluted, and we are killing the diversity in Earth's waters. It is essential that we preserve marine life and stop polluting the ocean and the creatures that inhabit it. 

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How the warming Arctic might be behind Boston's deep freeze

How the warming Arctic might be behind Boston's deep freeze | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
There may be a counterintuitive explanation for the deep freeze that hit New England this winter: The rapidly warming Arctic is causing big disruptions in the jet stream, which carries weather across North America. Is this the worst winter you've experienced?

 

Tags: physical, weather and climate, Arctic, Boston, climate change, podcast.


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Gail McAuliffe's curator insight, March 1, 2015 11:12 AM

Perhaps this article will sway some climate change skeptics...

Paul Farias's curator insight, April 9, 2015 11:33 AM

So bizarre how the rate of the arctic warming causes us to get smacked with the cold weather. Its one of those things that are like how does the jet stream actually work. Including the fact that California is getting hit with a major drought. 

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Gravitational Pull

Gravitational Pull | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

"Revolution and rotation are the terms we use to describe the motions of the earth and moon. Revolution is the movement of the earth in an orbit around the sun.  The Earth completes one revolution around the sun every 365 days. The moon revolves around the Earth about once every month." 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 14, 2014 2:24 PM

Understanding the relationships between the Sun, Earth and moon are critical for for understanding the seasons, climate and other geographic factors.  This interactive simulates gravity unlike anything I've every seen on a computer screen. 


To exploring Earth-Sun interactions, playing around with the University of Nebraska-Lincoln's Sun Simulator is a fun way to make a little more sense of the various factors that control how the Sun appears in the sky.

Barbara Goebel's curator insight, December 23, 2014 10:41 AM

Writing prompt: Specify a set of objects to put in motion, have them observe the interactions of the objects, then write to describe. For younger students, supply an observation organizer note sheet. For older students, the descriptions can be as technical as their math understanding will allow. 

Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 28, 2015 9:06 PM

It's pretty simple, the bigger the particle is, the bigger it's atmosphere is to allow more gravity. For example, Jupiter is the largest planet which is in favor to Earth. The reason why is because Jupiter uses it's large mass to protect Earth from oncoming meteors and comets. It uses it's large atmosphere to absorb comets and meteors onto Jupiter instead of allowing them to crash onto Earth. 

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Eerie Landforms

Eerie Landforms | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

Utah's Fantasy Canyon features mudstone eroded into bizarre shapes. This one's called "Flying Witch". #Halloween

 

Tags: physical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms, Utah.


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