STEM Connections
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Science, technology, engineering and math in K-12
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Robotics in Agriculture

Autonomous robots created at the University of Sydney can count fruit on trees, spray weeds, and even herd cows.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 19, 11:26 AM

We all know that agriculture is becoming increasingly mechanized.  In addition to large, expensive machinery, this video showcases some robots that are automating work that was previously very labor intensive. 

 

Questions to Ponder: How will robotics impact agriculture and other industries in the future?  Will this impact the spatial dynamics of agricultural land? 

 

Tagsfood production, agriculture, foodeconomic, industry, scale, agribusiness, technology.       

 

 

LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, May 20, 10:08 AM
Until robots understand holism and acquire a metaphysical connection with Nature, agriculture will probably continue down a path where soon they'll design artificial bees for pollination, and chemical-exuding worms to breakdown the nutrients predigested by bacteria ... if that works, which I doubt.
John Edwards's curator insight, June 2, 4:18 AM
I remember doing my GCSE French oral presentation on exactly this matter - "L'exode rural". Seems we're moving slower than I thought.
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Bad Earth: the human cost of pollution in China – in pictures

Bad Earth: the human cost of pollution in China – in pictures | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
This series of images shows the extent of China’s pollution problems and the human toll of exponential growth on local communities in China’s vast and severely damaged northern region

 

Ghazlan Mandukai, 52, left, looks out over the vast, toxic tailings lake beyond the industrial city of Baotou, Inner Mongolia. He farmed in this area for 40 years until the influx of steel and rare earth metal factories rendered local lands infertile. Poisonous waste that results from refining rare earths is continually dumped into the Weikuang Dam, as seen here.

 

Tags: pollution, China, East Asia, industry, sustainability, images, art, landscape.

 


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Keone Sinnott-Suardana's curator insight, June 22, 10:21 PM
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The Periodic Table of Elements Scaled to Show The Elements’ Actual Abundance on Earth

The Periodic Table of Elements Scaled to Show The Elements’ Actual Abundance on Earth | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
When you learned about The Periodic Table of Elements in high school, it probably didn’t look like this. Above, we have a different way of visualizing the elements. Created by Professor William F. Sheehan at Santa Clara University in 1970, this chart takes the elements (usually shown like this) and scales them relative to their abundance on the Earth’s surface.

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Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, November 19, 2015 7:57 AM

elements abundance

16s3d's curator insight, November 23, 2015 7:16 AM

Morphisme du tableau périodique des éléments en fonction de leur abondance

Lilydale High School's curator insight, May 17, 5:57 AM
science!
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The Legacy of Canals

The Legacy of Canals | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

"The historical geography of Erie Canal reshaped a nation."


Via Seth Dixon
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's insight:

Actually George Washington was interested in canals and the C and O and other canals in the area flourished for a time.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 28, 2014 8:54 AM

Back in the early 1800s, New York was one of the three biggest cities in the United States, but what led to it's surge past Philadelphia and Boston?  Geography and new technological innovations that favored New York City's relative location.   NYC was the only city on the East coast that could access the Great Lakes via canal, and after the construction of the Erie Canal, NYC has always been the preeminent city in the USA.  

TagsNYC, transportation, industry, economic, globalization, technology.

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Logging and Mudslides

Logging and Mudslides | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
In recent decades the state allowed logging — with restrictions — on the plateau above the Snohomish County hillside that collapsed in last weekend’s deadly mudslide.

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Geofreak's curator insight, April 3, 2014 1:39 PM

Mijnbouw en aardverschuivingen, een goede combinatie ...... 

PIRatE Lab's curator insight, April 7, 2014 11:48 AM

There are several reasons for mudslides--some are purely a result of physical geography and others are related to land use patterns.  This last week's mudslide in Washington state was a combination of the two and although this impacts one place (see on map), it is a good teaching moment to discuss the environmental impacts of land use patterns and resource extraction projects.  As seen in this interactive, the river was cutting at the base of the hill, while loggers were clear-cutting at the top of the mountain.  Trees help prevent erosion as the roots hold the soil in place--a critical piece to the puzzle in a very rainy climate.  With $1 million worth of timber on the slope, logging companies persisted despite objections from the Department of Natural Resources and some restrictions (but in hindsight, those restrictions clearly were not enough). 

 

View the impact in ArcGIS online: Before and After Swipe, LiDAR I and II, and Imagery.

 

Questions to Consider: Other than economic worth, what other ways are there to value and evaluate the environment?  How could this landscape have been protected and managed better or was this mudslide inevitable?   

El Futuro deWaukesha's curator insight, April 18, 2014 12:03 AM

Working on an Inquiry of recent natural disasters with first grader.  

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This is an incredible visualization of the world's shipping routes

This is an incredible visualization of the world's shipping routes | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

"Ships carry 11 billion tons of goods each year. This interactive map shows where they all go.  About 11 billion tons of stuff gets carried around the world every year by large ships. Clothes, flat-screen TVs, grain, cars, oil — transporting these goods from port to port is what makes the global economy go 'round.  And now there's a great way to visualize this entire process, through this stunning interactive map from the UCL Energy Institute."


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aitouaddaC's curator insight, May 2, 8:44 AM
On pourra voir aussi , en français  et en allemand :  http://ddc.arte.tv/nos-cartes/le-transport-maritime-coeur-de-la-mondialisation
South Florida Guide's curator insight, May 3, 11:40 AM
Very interesting.
Caitlyn Scott's curator insight, June 14, 10:25 PM
This resource shows great detail into where are products travel when they are imported but also shows us what and where Australian products are going. Good source in regards to showing how large Australia's export market is. Article contains a good amount of information as to why the routes shown on the map are taken as well as having in-depth data showing the different cargo on board ships. This data helps high light what different countries are renowned for in their exports as well as giving so information into why some countries are poorer than others when analysing their exports. Planned use within unit regarding the cost of Australian exports and its sustainability for the future.      
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The Ganges River Is Dying Under the Weight of Modern India

The Ganges River Is Dying Under the Weight of Modern India | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
The country’s future depends on keeping the holy river alive.

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Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 7:00 PM

The Ganges River is a place of religion for these people, they see it as a place where they can bathe for the forgiveness of sins and for ancestors alike. The only problem with this really is that it is a very dirty river, sewage and other sorts of waste, germs and disease are running through it. Unfortunately, the people are drinking from this river.  

Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:21 AM

The Ganges River is the most populated region in all of India. The river is sacred and is very holy to the people of India. The river is a religious river in which the people residing in the area use it as a symbolization or purification, life, bathing and drinking. The bigger issue for 'purification' is the fact that the river is very polluted and unsanitary. The pollution not only threatens the people because it could be used for drinking but it also affects the thousands of species, for example fish, that are in the river. The fish could be a source of food for the very overpopulated area but instead the very own people of India are damaging the river. One would think that a river so sacred would be protected and cleaned but it fails to meet these standards. Overall, regardless of the pollution, India still uses it for its religious beliefs and still declare it a holy river. 

Sarah Holloway's curator insight, February 16, 6:26 PM

This article touches on very serious religious and environmental issues connected to the Ganges River.  The Ganges is the sacred river of Hinduism and in part because the river valley is the most heavily populated region of India.  Simultaneously, this holy river is an incredibly polluted river as it's the watershed for a industrial region that struggles with significant sanitation problems; this is a great article on the environmental and cultural issues of development.

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The Atlas of Economic Complexity

"The Atlas is a powerful interactive tool enabling policy makers, entrepreneurs, academics, students and the general public to map the path of diversification and prosperity for 128 countries.  The tool will allow users to explore growth opportunities by country and industry, with the potential to provide input into economic policy and private investment decisions. The analysis may also be used to inform the agendas of development banks in policy recommendations and loan programming; an entrepreneur developing a market plan; an investment promotion agency pitching a new factory, as well as guide other choices we have yet to imagine." http://wp.me/P2dv5Z-21a


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 14, 2015 8:15 PM

This video is an introduction to the Atlas of Economic Complexity; in it they use the visualization tool to analyze the Netherlands' economy and the cut flower industry.  The Atlas of Economic Complexity is hosted by the Center for International Development at Harvard University (MIT also worked on this project and on their site it is called the Observatory of Economic Complexity).


Tags: developmentindustry, visualization, statistics, economicNetherlandsvideo.

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Troubles on Russia's Lake Baikal

"Workers at an ailing paper mill in Siberia are clinging to their jobs in the face of financial pressure and criticism from environmentalists.
Related Article: http://nyti.ms/gSvOkM"


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Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 29, 2015 7:16 PM

I can relate to this article seeing my research article is about Lake Baikal. You are right it is a bit outdated but most of the 2000 people who have lost their jobs are receiving help from the state even if it is short term. The people who have important skills are being relocated while others are given some other form of training. Others are waiting  for something to open up while in the meantime they are raising chickens and farming. There could be a bright side in the future economically as there has been talk about building a Russian type Disneyland which could produce income and jobs for people. The problem is there is a lot of environmental liquid waste to clean up which is cost effective. But it could attract investors in the future.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 1:34 PM

i feel like the problem of choosing between economic problems and environmental problem, deciding which is more important, happens all over the world. especially in this case where the people of baikal where there actually are no other jobs. in situations like this you have to decide if keeping those people alive now is more important than worrying about the environment in the future.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:15 AM

The environment, industry and politics play key roles in this story of an old style Soviet mono-town on Lake Baikal.  Monotowns had planned economies that revolved around one industry and today many of these are struggling in the post-Soviet era.  While the particulars of the political situation are a bit dated, the overall issue is still quite relevant to understanding Russia today. 

2013 update: The paper plant is now officially closed.   

 

Tags: Russia, industry, labor, environment, economic, water, pollution, environment modify, unit 6 industry.

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Follow the Things

"Who makes the things that we buy?  Few of us know. They seem untouched by human hands. Occasionally there's a news story, a documentary film, or an artwork showing the hidden ingredients in our coffee, t-shirts, or iPads. They often 'expose' unpleasant working conditions to encourage more 'ethical' consumer or corporate behaviour. followthethings.com is this work's 'online store'. Here you can find out who has followed what, why and how; the techniques used to 'grab' its audiences; the discussions and impacts that this has provoked; and how to follow things yourself."
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Fran Martin's curator insight, September 10, 2013 3:37 AM

Great website by colleague Ian Cook at Exeter University

Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, September 10, 2013 3:56 AM

About Globalisation, flows and production today. 

Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 8, 2013 12:32 PM

Where did your T-Shirt come from?   Where did the food your parents bought at the grocery store come from?  What's the origin of the components in your cell phone?  These questions all allude to what geographers call a commodity chain analysis.  Analyzing where the consumer goods that we use every day came from can make global issues hit a little closer to home and reinforce concepts such as globalization. The website Follow the Things is a great resource for learning  about commodity chains and mapping out your own personal geographies.