STEM Connections
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Science, technology, engineering and math in K-12
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Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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The World's Newest (Official) Ocean

The World's Newest (Official) Ocean | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

"The Southern Ocean extends from the coast of Antarctica north to 60 degrees south latitude. The Southern Ocean is now the fourth largest of the world's five oceans (after the Pacific Ocean, Atlantic Ocean, and Indian Ocean, but larger than the Arctic Ocean). The International Hydrographic Organization (IHO) has  declared, named, and demarcated the Southern Ocean as a fifth, separate ocean."


Via Seth Dixon, Jane Ellingson, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 6, 10:37 AM

Typically we define oceans and seas based on their borders with land as their most important characteristics.  Also, we rarely look at the bottom of the globe as the center of our global perspective.  Those are a few of the reasons why American students usually have never heard of the Southern Ocean, but Australian students see it as one of the world's main oceans.  

 

TagsOceaniaAntarctica, water, environment, physical.

Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Geography Education
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Aerial Photographs Catalogue the Life and Death of Volcanic Islands

Aerial Photographs Catalogue the Life and Death of Volcanic Islands | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

Volcanic islands can seem to appear out of nowhere, emerging from the ocean like breaching monsters of the deep. Below, Mika McKinnon explains how these odd geological formations are born, how they evolve, and how they eventually vanish back beneath the waves.


Via Seth Dixon
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Matthew Richmond's curator insight, December 2, 2015 3:30 PM

Re-scooped from Professor Dixon, pretty cool story on the formation of islands in the south Pacific. A couple of them look like the island visible from the beach in Rincon, Puerto Rico where I stayed. The island is one giant rock so nobody lives there and it's a naval base for the U.S. military. This, however, is a different situation when you realize that not only do people live here, but kind of a lot of people live here.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 9:00 PM

What causes the death and the caldera in a volcano? One thing that happens in a deceased volcano is the center of the volcano starts to either erode or the inside finally caves in. Once this happen a caldera takes shape and the ocean starts to take over. As the waves eat away at the shores it will eventually create a island that is shaped like a "U". After this happens that island will someday retreat back into the ocean and someday form a barrier reef.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:52 PM

Based on general knowledge, I know that the taller a volcano is, the younger it is and the shorter it is, the older it is. The reason they start to get short is from erosion. Hot spots in the Earth's crust make small islands from molten rock. Young islands can be very dangerous, because if they are inhabited, they have the possibility of erupting, whereas an old island does not since the volcano is lnactice and eroding. Over time the inactive volcano will crumble and a caldera will take shape and after even more time, that caldera will slip under the ocean and become a reef. 

Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Geography Education
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The Great Barrier Reef

"Australia urged the UN's World Heritage Committee to keep the Great Barrier Reef off the 'in danger' list to protect their tourism industry. But that doesn't mean the ecological treasure is not in danger."

 

Tags: biogeography, environment, ecology, Australia, Oceania.


Via Seth Dixon
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Danielle Kedward's curator insight, September 12, 2015 7:38 AM
World Heritage for Year 7
Sally Egan's curator insight, November 23, 2015 6:29 PM

Great article for the GBR as an ecosystem at risk.

Chris Costa's curator insight, December 1, 2015 4:27 PM

I have enjoyed the emphasis on the human aspect of geography in this course, and how geography impacts us. However, as much as the world influences us, we do have a substantial amount of influence on the composition of the planet, oftentimes for the worse. The Great Barrier Reef is one of the greatest wonders of the world, home to some of the most spectacular sights one can see; as someone who has been scuba diving a handful of times, I can only imagine what it must be like to explore such a world below the surface, seeing all the life that surrounds me. I would love to be able to at some point in my life, but there is a great probability that I might never get the opportunity, as the reef is dying- fast. 50% of the reef has been lost over the past 3 decades, and while Australia has pledged to reserve over a billion dollars to fund conservation efforts, it might be a case of too little, too late. Man-made climate change as a whole is taking a toll on one of nature's greatest treasures, and it might be out of the hands of the Australian damage to reverse the damage that has already been done. I would love to have the opportunity to see this one day, and I hope I get to, but I don't know if I ever will if current rates of reef loss continue. Here's to hoping humanity gets it act together and tries to save the geography we often take for granted; we won't like the ugly landscapes that will follow if we don't.

Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Geography Education
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What is a Hotspot?

1) What is a hotspot? A volcanic "hotspot" is an area in the upper mantle from which heat rises in a plume from deep in the Earth. High heat and lower pressure at the base of the mantle facilitates melting of the rock. This melt, called magma, rises through cracks to the surface and forms volcanoes. As the tectonic plate moves over the stationary hot spot, the volcanoes are rafted away and new ones form in their place.


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Danielle Lip's curator insight, April 22, 2015 9:46 PM

While watching this video you can learn a lot about a hotspot in just 2 minutes, understanding that a hotspot is an area in the upper mantle in which heat rises and slowly begins to expand, building up pressure. The magma, which is hot rises and the cold matter sinks. the magma rises through the cracks and the plates actually carry the volcano. How did the whole idea of a volcano occur? Who knows where these volcanos are?  The hotspot can cause volcanos to erupt or even cause the volcanos to spread out, who knew a hotspot could be such a huge influence on the world, causing massive landforms and causing much tragedy.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, May 6, 2015 10:33 AM

What is a hotspot? It is a source of localized energy from the seafloor that creates volcanoes. It is not just a shallow reservoir nor a pipe filled with liquid. It is a constant stream of magma that does not move. Simple the plate move over it creating a row of multiple volcanoes, such as the Hawaiian Islands. When the magma erupts thru the surface the magma then turns to lava, and dries to rock. This process repeats until the built up lava is a volcano, still with hotspot in the middle. The plate moves and the hotspot creates a new volcano.

                This is interesting because hotspots are always changing geography, and causing map makers and teachers everywhere to learn new islands. 

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:18 PM

this is a good way to discover how volcanoes are formed, and if you are trying to understand the Oceania region then this is information you need to know.