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The field guide, rebooted

The field guide, rebooted | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

"Map of Life joins a small but growing number of mobile applications seeking to reimagine the field guide by combining big data and mobile technology. Following in the footsteps of iNaturalist, a standard-bearer for natural history mobile applications, it allows users to instantly contribute their own geolocated, time-stamped species observations." 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 19, 2015 6:04 PM

The network of geographic alliances will be working on a BioBlitz national initiative in 2016. This article highlights two mobile apps that will enable users to use their smartphones to explore and archive the natural world around them and run an awesome BioBlitz. 

 

Tags: National Geographicphysical, biogeography, environment, edtech.

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If all the Ice melted: National Geographic's Interactive map on Rising Seas

If all the Ice melted: National Geographic's Interactive map on Rising Seas | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

What if all the ice melted in the world? Now whether you believe global warming happens because of human activities or naturally is another debate. The questions “How would the world look if ALL the ice melted?” How much would the sea rise by? What would be the average temperature on Earth? are of interest to everyone.

Trust National Geographic not only to capture such questions in the best manner possible but also to visualize it in such geoawesome manner! Here’s the super interesting map by National Geographic “IF ALL THE ICE MELTED“!

 

Tags: physical, weather and climate, National Geographic, climate change, water, visualization.


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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, April 5, 2015 9:05 AM

Climate change is all about the "Pendulum Effect," where the extremes is what matters, not so much the median or average. The average may fluctuate some, but the real problem comes when the weather goes haywire. Too much water can be as destructive as too little water, and this doesn't only happen in time but in space as well, where regions get too much of one and too little of the other. We'll see strips of drought and strips of wetness, strips of cold and strips of heat, like bands across regions and across the planet. If he ice melts, the sea and fresh water strips in the ocean will keep the fresh water atop and it'll probably freeze in great bands in winter and provoke an extreme albedo effect cooling down the planet radically followed immediately by a potential mini ice age.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, April 5, 2015 9:23 PM

Impact of climate change on landforms and landscapes 


The human causes and effects of landscape degradation (ACHGK051)

The ways of protecting significant landscapes (ACHGK052)



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Protecting an Ocean at Risk

"Pristine Seas is an exploration, research, and media project to find, survey, and help protect the last wild places in the ocean. These pristine places are unknown by all but long-distance fishing fleets, which have started to encroach on them. It is essential that we let the world know that these places exist, that they are threatened, and that they deserve to be protected.  Learn more about Pristine Seas here: http://ocean.nationalgeographic.com/ocean/explore/pristine-seas/ "


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 12, 2015 12:35 PM

I was enchanted hearing Enriq Sala discuss his passion for ocean biodiversity and purity.  This passion, combined with scientific exploration and political advocacy is the backbone of a National Geographic's Pristine Seas project.  Here is one news story about the Seychelles, and how they are trying to manage their fishing industries to promote sustainability and hopefully the Pristine Seas project will lead to greater awareness of the need for ocean conservation. 


Tags: water, conservation, National Geographicphysical, biogeography, environmentpollution, resources.

Emily Coats's curator insight, March 24, 2015 12:41 PM

INDUSTRIALIZATION 

Fishing and Urban Development have detrimentally destroyed our oceans, and we have polluted the seas at such a high level. Urban growth and over fishing have caused our oceans to be polluted, and we are killing the diversity in Earth's waters. It is essential that we preserve marine life and stop polluting the ocean and the creatures that inhabit it. 

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Geography of Thanksgiving

Geography of Thanksgiving | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 26, 2014 3:31 PM

I am very pleased to be blogging for National Geographic Education.  Here is the link to my first post on the geography of Thanksgiving. 

Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 28, 2014 2:34 PM

Dr. Seth Dixon also has geographyeducation.org, one of the finest sites of its kind...

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Feeding Our Hungry Planet

"By 2050, the world's population will likely increase 35 percent. But is growing more food the only option—or even the best? National Geographic investigates the challenges and solutions to feeding everyone on our planet, based on an eight-month series in National Geographic magazine.  Visit http://natgeofood.com for ongoing coverage of food issues as we investigate the Future of Food today on World Food Day."

 

Tags: sustainability, agriculture, food production, unit 5 agriculture.


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Truthbehere2's curator insight, October 17, 2014 10:30 AM

I think I might as well buy some land and plant my own huge garden for this crap coming up and have a fence around my yard too

Nancy Watson's curator insight, October 19, 2014 8:53 AM

Population increase is just part of the story. How do we feed everyone? How will we provide for the needs of everyone?  Can the earth sustain the use of her resources and the impact of our growing needs and output. First we must eat. Can we learn to do that wisely? 

Bella Reagan's curator insight, November 28, 2014 5:48 PM

Unit 2-Population

 

This video was about the growing population in the world and as a result the growing food demand. This video points out that even though more food production seems like the solution, instead other solutions are more logical. Solutions include reducing wastes, preserving forests, being more productive on current farms and more. It states that farming is a huge business but it goes towards more than growing food for people to eat but also for other things like animals and materials. The worlds population is growing and there needs to be a change in food industries to keep thriving. 

 

This relates to unit 2 about population since it is thinking of ways to adapt to the worlds growing population. By 2050 it is predicted that population will increase by 33% and something has to change about food in order for people to stay fed. There is too much food being wasted that if that could be decreased it could make a huge difference. The video made a good point that it's not that we need more food it's that we need to manage and prioritize production.  

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The World's Largest Trees

"The world's second-largest known tree, the President, in Sequoia National Park is photographed by National Geographic magazine photographer Michael 'Nick' Nichols for the December 2012 issue."


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Hemant Galviya's curator insight, April 17, 2014 2:55 AM

hiiiiiiiiiiii

Miroslav Sopko's curator insight, April 18, 2014 11:44 AM

Najväčšie stromy sveta.

Basant Kerketta's curator insight, April 21, 2014 4:26 AM

Magnificent !!!

These kind must be saved.

Wish I could plant and replicate this size and height here in my home town.

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Rising Seas: If All The Ice Melted

Rising Seas: If All The Ice Melted | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
Explore the world’s new coastlines if sea level rises 216 feet.

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Brian Hammerstix's curator insight, November 23, 2013 7:29 PM

#stopburningfossilfuels or #goodbyeflorida

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 1:15 PM

Aside from the mass devastation i think it would be pretty cool of all the ice melted. As the interactive map shows there would be in inland sea in australia which i can turn into the AUs great lakes. Also imagine the possiblility of being able to take a vacation to antartica and not having to dress for absurdly negative tempatures, all the undiscovered land and preservated fossils. It would be a interestling link to the past that only in the future we could experience.

Mrs. Karnowski's curator insight, August 27, 2014 7:20 AM

Would Belgium be covered in water if all the ice melted?

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MOOC on Water

"Water is an essential theme in social studies, science, and geography. Whether teaching about natural or human systems, water is part of the story. This course, framed around California's Education and the Environment Initiative (EEI), focuses on ocean and freshwater topics and strategies for teaching environmental topics in Grades 4-8. Resources and support are provided for how to use EEI to implement Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 6, 2013 8:27 AM

This new MOOC on water resources in California is project supported by National Geographic Education and Annenberg Learner.  This is a course is designed to span the disciplines and create an awareness in students about environmental issues that impact them. 


Tags: consumptionCalifornia, water, environment, resources, environment depend.

Top Free Classes's curator insight, September 10, 2013 12:45 AM

Starts in October.

Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, October 12, 2013 6:53 PM

I find this video very informative because I didn’t know, that they have this type of course. I feel this course should be teach in every classroom around the United States, because is not only the adult that needs to learn how to protect the environment. We also need to educate our children because they are the future of America.  I think that by taking this class people will learn which places have the more environmental problem, and by becoming more aware of the issue , we all together will find the solution.

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Earth's Green Places Mapped

"Although 75% of the planet is a relatively unchanging ocean of blue, the remaining 25% of Earth's surface is a dynamic green. Data from the NASA/NOAA Suomi NPP satellite is able to detect these subtle differences in greenness. The resources on this page highlight our ever-changing planet, using highly detailed vegetation index data from the satellite, developed by scientists at NOAA. The darkest green areas are the lushest in vegetation, while the pale colors are sparse in vegetation cover either due to snow, drought, rock, or urban areas. Satellite data from April 2012 to April 2013 was used to generate these animations and images."


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Louis Culotta's curator insight, July 16, 2013 5:05 PM

This is something to check out if you want to see first hand look at the green and not so green places on our planet. It really makes you see the parts of the world that get enough rain and the areas that don't that makes what we see from Satellite images from space.

Magnus Gustafsson's curator insight, July 16, 2013 5:13 PM

Useful insiight how we humans can change the world!

Al Picozzi's comment, July 18, 2013 11:19 AM
Can really see the effect of development in the Amazon river basin. Also this system can be a great use to help in areas that are facing a drought.
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The World’s Congested Human Migration Routes in 5 Maps

The World’s Congested Human Migration Routes in 5 Maps | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

"The desperate men, women, and children flooding into Europe from the Middle East and Africa are not the only people moving along ever-shifting and dangerous migration routes. Last year saw the highest levels of global forced displacement on record—59.5 million individuals left their homes in 2014 due to 'persecution, conflict, generalized violence, or human rights violations' according to the United Nations. That's 8.3 million more people than the year before."


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PSC AS Geography's curator insight, September 21, 2015 8:30 AM

Excellent links here to the population movement and global shift of people moving from 'Switched Off' to 'Switched On' and from developing to developed regions of Europe and North America.

Matthieu CLEMENT's curator insight, September 25, 2015 12:25 AM

Pour compléter et prolonger un petit peu notre dossier sur la crise des réfugiés en Europe. A analyser  une série de cartes dans l'article aux différentes échelles régionales.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 1, 2015 4:14 AM

The World’s Congested Human Migration Routes in 5 Maps

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Nat Geo Kids on YouTube

Nat Geo Kids on YouTube | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

"Did you know 300 hours of video are uploaded to YouTube every minute? That's a lot of video to sort through! Luckily, National Geographic Kids has done the work for you. We're bringing you the best videos the Internet has to offer! 

 

National Geographic Kids playlists are an exciting way to 

discover the very best of YouTube. Hosted by kids for kids, we've created amazing playlists on awesome animals, cool science, funny pets, and more. With a new playlist added regularly, we're the best destination for curious kids like you to explore, laugh, and learn. So pick a topic you love and start watching today!"

 

Tags: National Geographic, K12, biogeography.


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Marianne Naughton's curator insight, March 21, 2015 5:29 PM

Nat Geo For Kids

Dr. Faith Morrison Alexander's curator insight, March 23, 2015 5:47 AM

This is fantastic!  For our visual learners, this technology can easily be embedded into daily instruction.

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Teaching Cultural Empathy: Stereotypes, World Views and Cultural Difference

Teaching Cultural Empathy: Stereotypes, World Views and Cultural Difference | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

"I am torn about how to teach these two ideas about cultures and societies all around the world:

People and cultures are different all over the world.People and cultures are the same all over the world.

These points may seem like a contradiction, but when put into proper context they teach important truths about culture."


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Avery Liardon's curator insight, March 23, 2015 9:48 PM

Unit 3:

Shines insight on stereotypes that are commonly used throughout the world. Reading this article really made me think about stereotypes that are so commonly used they are considered acceptable. It's a ridiculous idea to think that all people under a culture act and behave the same way. 

Emily Coats's curator insight, March 24, 2015 12:06 PM

UNIT 3 CULTURE

This article is written to compare and contrast various ways to teach young school children about global cultures. On one hand, we can relate all cultures to each other, due to their common goals and views. For example, all families around the world aim to do what's best for each other, love and cherish one another, and try their hardest to succeed economically. On the other hand, cultures are extremely different around the world, with different music, clothing, and underlying views on life. We can continue to say that popular culture has diffused so greatly, with advanced technologies and means of transportation, so it has influenced and homogenized our landscape quite a bit. Folk culture is obviously still a powerful force, but popular culture does have some effects around the world. I believe that children need to understand the importance of maintaining diversity thy preserving folk culture but they also need to acknowledge the pros and cons of the global diffusion of popular culture and how it connects us at a global scale. 

Danielle Smith's curator insight, April 12, 2015 12:21 AM

I think Teaching Cultural Empathy: Stereotypes, World Views and Cultural Difference is a helpful article for teachers to read. This article considers ideas I constantly come back to, whilst collecting resources and ideas for teaching students about cultural diversity and identity. How do I teach students, that ‘people and cultures are different all over the world’ (Dixon, 2015, April 2), but also the same?

Dixon suggests that we need to teach that people and cultures worldwide are the SAME and DIFFERENT simultaneously.  In this way, students can appreciate the rich diversity of cultures and societies, whilst at the same time learning values of humanity and empathy, which unite us all.

 

I believe by recognising and appreciating the rich cultures of students in the classroom, we can explore and learn about cultural diversity in an honest, rich and non-stereotypical way and allow students to feel valued at the same time. In addition, as students know each other, this helps them relate to ‘people from other places, who speak other languages’ and follow different religions to their own (Dixon, 2015, April 2). Furthermore, this should help increase intercultural understanding in the classroom by developing a ‘socially cohesive’ environment that ‘respects, and appreciates cultural, social and religious diversity’ (MYCEETA, p. 7).

 

References

Dixon, S. (2015, April 2). Teaching cultural empathy: Stereotypes, world views and cultural difference. National Geographic. Retrieved April 7, 2015, http: http://blog.education.nationalgeographic.com/2015/02/04/teaching-cultural-empathy-stereotypes-world-views-and-cultural-difference/

 

Ministerial Council on Education, Employment, Training, and Youth Affairs. (2008, December). Melbourne declaration on educational goals for young Australians. Melbourne: Author. 

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Geography of Thanksgiving

Geography of Thanksgiving | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 26, 2014 3:31 PM

I am very pleased to be blogging for National Geographic Education.  Here is the link to my first post on the geography of Thanksgiving. 

Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 28, 2014 2:34 PM

Dr. Seth Dixon also has geographyeducation.org, one of the finest sites of its kind...

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The Great Green Wall

The Great Green Wall | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
The Great Green Wall initiative uses an integrated approach to restore a diversity of ecosystems to the North African landscape.

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Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 5:53 PM

The great green wall initiative project, is a project which wants to plant tens of thousands of trees, roughly fifty thousand trees alone in Senegal. The point of this is to restore a failing  environment. Around five hundred million people are living in a desertification area. Both human and nature is at fault for this creation of a transition zone getting bigger and bigger, Humans are not necessarily taking care of the land like it should be taken care of and as for factors of nature such as climate change, drought and not enough rain. There are social impacts that may affect the area too, experts think that improvements in land and economy may help curb terrorism in Mali. 

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:59 PM

The great green wall is a way of separating the desert from the rain forest in Africa The Sahel is the area that separates the deforestation and the desert and would be a way to keep the desert in a different climatic region of the country.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 2:40 PM

this a great i think, the only way that countries in an area with such harsh environments can survive is by helping eachother and using their own beneficial land to help other and recieve help for their own deficiencies. 

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Changing Earth

Changing Earth | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
Over the years, ISS astronauts have had a rare opportunity to witness climate change on Earth from space.

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Sally Egan's curator insight, March 30, 2014 7:29 PM

A great illustation of the changes to the environment as a result of increasing technology and population. Plays for 1minute 30.

Sally Egan's curator insight, March 30, 2014 7:34 PM

A short but fascinating illustration of the rapid changes to areas of teh Earth, observed by astronauts since 2000. Plays for 1 minute 30.  

BI Media Specialists's curator insight, April 4, 2014 7:46 AM
This is a great resource for some of our science classes. It is an interesting presentation of the changes that we are making over time.
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The Geography and Literacy Connection

The Geography and Literacy Connection | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

"What do you think of when you hear the word literacy? Depending on what you teach, chances are geography is not the first thought that comes to mind. But believe it or not, geography and literacy naturally share many similarities. And you can deepen students’ learning in both geography and literacy when they are integrated in the curriculum."


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Ana Melo's curator insight, November 4, 2013 9:41 AM

Geography provides a lot of fundamental knowledge and gives you also a sense of place, which I find very relevant in times of globalization where you belong everywhere and nowhere simultaneously.

Chris Cividino's curator insight, November 8, 2013 12:06 AM

Understanding key terminology in geography is paramount to demonstrating deep knowledge of geographical concepts.

Max Minard's curator insight, March 21, 2015 10:45 PM

In this report, a researcher describes the relationship between geography and literacy on educational terms. When combined, these two very similar topics would provide major benefits to a child curriculum in school giving them a better insight on geography through literary concepts. These certain concepts help kids better recognize relationships within graphs and charts that give valuable geographic information. This article helps prove geography as a field of inquiry based on its relations with other subjects that help enhance the knowledge among the children in any school curriculum. 

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What Do We Mean by 'Reading' Maps?

What Do We Mean by 'Reading' Maps? | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
The common-core standards present an ambiguous message on how to draw information from maps and charts, Phil Gersmehl says.

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mufidmmn's comment, July 24, 2013 4:08 AM
ngapain itu ya
Taryn Coxall's curator insight, August 5, 2013 9:38 PM

This is a resource i feel would be relevant to those students who struggle to be egaged in their reading

This can be used on readers on many different level

the reading maps foccus on language arts, Its description is communicated through charts, graphs, and maps intead of normal paragraphs and text

Shelby Porter's comment, September 30, 2013 11:19 AM
I feel the skill of reading a map is very important, but it becoming less prevalent in classrooms. Teachers may find it more difficult to teach and therefore are not going in depth with it. I remember as a child in grade school we would color maps or have to find where the states are. We never were taught how to fully understand the uses of a map and all the different ways they are used and how to read them. It is becoming a lost skill in a world that needs to be more appreciative of geography.