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Science, technology, engineering and math in K-12
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40 maps that explain World War I | vox.com

40 maps that explain World War I | vox.com | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

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38 maps that explain Europe

38 maps that explain Europe | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
Europe, as both a place and a concept, has changed dramatically in its centuries of history.

 

Tags: Europe, map.


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Padriag John-David Mahoney's curator insight, February 19, 2015 3:17 PM

Despite the number of maps and figures, this is a really nice, condensed  broad stroke  of European history and politics, geography, and some economies. It's  also, for me, very entertaining.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, February 26, 2015 7:49 PM

Europe was once the most war torn nation, but is now known for its peace. This article’s introduction says that Europe has relative great prosperity but at the same time deep economic turmoil. I guess like everywhere else. This is a collection of 38 maps that show Europe in different stages of development to give the reader a better understanding. The first maps shows the countries that make up the EU. NATO’s growth is show in the second map from 1949 to 2009. Some maps show the unemployment rates, while others show who in Europe uses the Euro. Mine home country of Italy is shown in the lowest category of unemployment in the southern region. Other maps illustrate the histories of Europe starting in 117. AD. I think that this collection of maps is awesome for gathering knowledge on Europe. It sure is teaching me a lot.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 6, 2015 7:55 PM

At first this was overwhelming to digest.  But then I found it amazing in the fact that Europe could be explained in 38 maps!  The break down was very interesting.  I found it funny to see the breakdown of the richest in Europe.  This being based on finance, businesses, and real estate.  Nutella is definitely one of my favorites, but I had no clue the company was worth $27 billion.  

Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from 21st Century Innovative Technologies and Developments as also discoveries, curiosity ( insolite)...
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French surgeon performs world’s first spinal fusion surgery using 3D printed spine cages

French surgeon performs world’s first spinal fusion surgery using 3D printed spine cages | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
A surgeon in Lyon, France has performed the world's first spinal fusion surgery using customized spine cages created with a 3D printer.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?tag=3D

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, July 22, 2014 8:07 AM

A surgeon in Lyon, France has performed the world's first spinal fusion surgery using customized spine cages created with a 3D printer.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?tag=3D


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Top 10 Countries That Disappeared In The 20th Century

Top 10 Countries That Disappeared In The 20th Century | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
New nations seem to pop up with alarming regularity. At the start of the 20th century, there were only a few dozen independent sovereign states on the planet; today, there are nearly 200!

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, July 2, 2013 11:38 AM

Amazing to see many of the countries and empires that are no longer around.  Also with the dissoution of many of the empires it lead's to many of the issues that were are dealiing with today.  Splitting the Austro-Hugaraian Empire after WWI along ethnic lines didn't really work and helped to lead to WWII.  The Germans in the Sudetenland in Czechoslovakia fro example.  See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sudetendeutsche_gebiete.svg

 for the area of German population.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 27, 2014 5:01 PM

10 countries that have become nonexistent in the 20th century include Tibet, East Germany and Yugoslavia. These countries have died off because of ethic, religious and cultural falls that were quickly taken over by bigger and more powerful countries.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 23, 2014 9:13 PM

Essentially this article boils down to the issues of religion, ethnicity and nationalism.  People who are diverse and have different ideas generally cannot all live together under one rule and agree on everything, hence nations split and new ones form to cater to their own beliefs and similarities.

Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Geography Education
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4 Maps Crucial to Understanding Europe's Population Shift

4 Maps Crucial to Understanding Europe's Population Shift | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
Despite economic growth in Central and Eastern Europe, the continent is still migrating to the Northwest.

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Sally Egan's curator insight, November 23, 2015 6:42 PM

These contemporary maps help undetrstand the changing global population distribution.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 7, 2015 4:53 PM

The two maps that received my attention the most was 'No Work for the Young' and "Big City Drain.' It bothers me to read that the young population of European citizens is out of work, even the cities that do well. Stockholm, a well off country has a you unemployment rate of 30 percent, and Sheffield is 35 percent, that is huge! As for Big City Drain, although Europe's cities are growing, it is because of immigrants from other countries and migrants from that country moving to another part, just to find better work. Having immigrants does not help a particular countries population. Also the fact that since big cities are more expensive, people will leave the big cities such as London and Paris to find cheaper means of living. 

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, December 15, 2015 1:01 AM

Population shifts are an important part of determining migrating trends of a population. Are they going to more urban areas? Are they going to suburban areas?  These maps can help understand the questions regarding where the higher population trends are and what countries are seeing a drop in their population to people moving to new places and creating new lives.

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The price of passage

The price of passage | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
Almost 35,000 people have reached the shores of Italy and Malta in 2013 and two-thirds have filed for asylum.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 6, 2014 1:00 PM

This interactive map/infographic is a wealth of information about migration to Europe. 


TagsEurope, migration, economic, labor, infographic

Jennifer Lopez's curator insight, November 7, 2014 10:51 AM

This passage was about the immigration that are coming into Europe. It helped me learn how they get to there destination and the struggles they go through. This scoop also showed me thew amount of money a immigrant would have to spend in or for them to get to their destination. By it showing us statistics i can get a better understanding. Also, the statistics about the amount of immigrants that don't get to even make it to their destination and what they can and cannot bring with them.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 5, 2014 1:41 PM

Due to the vast distances and irregular manner of transportation to Europe, prices are very high with transport between northern Africa and southern Europe often costing more than 1000 dollars. Even traveling from Greece to Italy can cost up to 6000 dollars. Despite the high price to "guarantee access", the journey is still dangerous with 500 deaths over a two month period in 2013. This interactive shows that even though 35,000 seems like a lot of people to arrive in Europe in 2013, it is a very long, difficult, and expensive journey to get there.

Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from 21st Century Innovative Technologies and Developments as also discoveries, curiosity ( insolite)...
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E-ELT: Europe's Extreme New Telescope - Space - YouTube

The Atacama desert in Chile is famous for nothing: no water, no plants, no animals. That makes it a perfect place for astronomy, and the ideal location to bu...

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Gust MEES's curator insight, July 18, 2014 10:26 AM

E-ELT: Europe's Extreme New Telescope - Space