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Science, technology, engineering and math in K-12
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Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Geography Education
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When Mexico Was Flooded By Immigrants

When Mexico Was Flooded By Immigrants | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
In the early nineteenth-century, Mexico had a problem with American immigrants.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 29, 2016 4:53 PM
A century and a half ago, the immigration debate and geopolitical shifts in power on the United States-Mexico border reflected a profoundly different dynamic than it does today.  This history has enduring cultural impacts on southwestern states that had the international border jump them.

 

Tags: culture, demographicsmigration, North Americahistorical, colonialism, borders, political.

Ken Feltman's curator insight, July 31, 2016 7:56 AM
Turning the tables...
Rescooped by Bonnie Bracey Sutton from Geography Education
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4 Maps Crucial to Understanding Europe's Population Shift

4 Maps Crucial to Understanding Europe's Population Shift | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
Despite economic growth in Central and Eastern Europe, the continent is still migrating to the Northwest.

Via Seth Dixon
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Sally Egan's curator insight, November 23, 2015 6:42 PM

These contemporary maps help undetrstand the changing global population distribution.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 7, 2015 4:53 PM

The two maps that received my attention the most was 'No Work for the Young' and "Big City Drain.' It bothers me to read that the young population of European citizens is out of work, even the cities that do well. Stockholm, a well off country has a you unemployment rate of 30 percent, and Sheffield is 35 percent, that is huge! As for Big City Drain, although Europe's cities are growing, it is because of immigrants from other countries and migrants from that country moving to another part, just to find better work. Having immigrants does not help a particular countries population. Also the fact that since big cities are more expensive, people will leave the big cities such as London and Paris to find cheaper means of living. 

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, December 15, 2015 1:01 AM

Population shifts are an important part of determining migrating trends of a population. Are they going to more urban areas? Are they going to suburban areas?  These maps can help understand the questions regarding where the higher population trends are and what countries are seeing a drop in their population to people moving to new places and creating new lives.

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Old Mexico lives on

Old Mexico lives on | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
On February 2nd 1848, following a short and one-sided war, Mexico agreed to cede more than half its territory to the United States. An area covering most of present-day Arizona, California, Nevada, New Mexico and Utah, plus parts of several other states, was handed over to gringolandia. The rebellious state of Tejas, which had declared its independence from Mexico in 1836, was recognised as American soil too. But a century and a half later, communities have proved more durable than borders. The counties with the highest concentration of Mexicans (as defined by ethnicity, rather than citizenship) overlap closely with the area that belonged to Mexico before the great gringo land-grab of 1848. Some are recent arrivals; others trace their roots to long before the map was redrawn. They didn’t jump the border—it jumped them.

 

Tags: culture, demographics, North America, historical, colonialism, borders, political.


Via Seth Dixon
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1/5 of Humanity

1/5 of Humanity | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

"The world divided into 5 regions, each with the population of China."


Via Seth Dixon, Fabio Padovan
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's insight:

Your thoughts...?

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2013 2:15 AM

Population and liveability are connected. Population distribution and density influence the characterisics from places - at all scales ( region, continent, country, state ,city, neighbourhood)

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 5:42 AM

This map is mind blowning to try to grasp. To think that India has an equvilant population to every country in the Americans has me dumbfounded. Then comparin the economic instability of India to all the economic juggernauts that fit into the light blue regions really shows how poor the distrubution of wealth and population is throught the world.

Trish Pearson's curator insight, April 9, 2014 3:33 PM

A little perspective on population