Stem Cells & Tissue Engineering
50.5K views | +0 today
Stem Cells & Tissue Engineering
Stem Cells & Tissue Engineering  news and updates
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Jacob Blumenthal
Scoop.it!

Rejuvenation of the muscle stem cell population restores strength to injured aged muscles - Nature Medicine

Jacob Blumenthal's insight:

A new paper, published in Nature Medicine suggests that in-vitro modification of skeletal muscle stem cells (MuSCs) isolated from aged mice, can restore their potential for regeneration  and their ability to strengthen damaged muscles, when transplanted back into aged mice.

Full paper:

http://www.nature.com/nm/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nm.3464.html

 

Media release: http://media.utoronto.ca/media-releases/turning-back-the-clock-on-aging-muscles/

 

Learn more about the embryonic development of skeletal muscles:

http://discovery.lifemapsc.com/in-vivo-development/skeletal-muscle

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jacob Blumenthal
Scoop.it!

Cell Reports - NPTX1 Regulates Neural Lineage Specification from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

Jacob Blumenthal's insight:

Researchers from the Neural Stem Cell Institute have discovered that the secreted protein  NPTX1 plays a key role in neural lineage specification. They found that NPTX1 is rapidly upregulated during neural induction from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) and that by  contolling its expression levels it is possible to reduce or initiate neural lineage commitment.

Full paper: http://www.cell.com/cell-reports/fulltext/S2211-1247(14)00043-6#Summary


Learn more about stem cells:

http://discovery.lifemapsc.com/


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jacob Blumenthal
Scoop.it!

STAP cells were predicted back in 2011

The effect of stress on dedifferentiation of somatic cells was suggested back in 2011, by Prof. Dov Zipori from the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel, in a paper entitled "Mammalian cell dedifferentiation as a possible outcome of stress". 

Jacob Blumenthal's insight:

While stem cell researchers try to reproduce  STAP cells in their own laboratories, I think it is important to remember that this phenomena is not all new. The effect of stress on dedifferentiation of somatic cells was suggested back in 2011, by Prof. Dov Zipori from the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel, in a paper entitled "Mammalian cell dedifferentiation as a possible outcome of stress". 

In this paper, Zipori and another researcher Ofer Shoshani, suggest that this mechanism enables tissues in the body to adopt to extreme conditions, such as injury which allows eventually  tissue regeneration.

A link to Zipori's paper: 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21279479

 

Come and learn more about stem cells:

http://discovery.lifemapsc.com/stem-cell-differentiation

 

 

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jacob Blumenthal
Scoop.it!

Stem Cells For Darwin: How iPSCs Can Explore Evolution

Stem Cells For Darwin: How iPSCs Can Explore Evolution | Stem Cells & Tissue Engineering | Scoop.it
Jacob Blumenthal's insight:

This short new article in Forbes, discuss a paper recently published in Nature journal where researchers generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from humans, chimpanzees and  bonobos. They investigated the regulation of long interspersed nuclear element-1 (LINE-1 or L1) transposons in order to understand why humans as a species have such limited genetic variation, compared to the non-human primates (NHP) most closely related to them.

Full paper: 

http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v503/n7477/full/nature12686.html


Learn more about embryonic development and stem cells:

http://discovery.lifemapsc.com/

 


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jacob Blumenthal
Scoop.it!

Harnessing the potential of stem cells for new medicines: Doug Melton at TEDxBeaconStreet

Jacob Blumenthal's insight:

Doug Melton speaks about the potential of stem cell biology for regenerative medicine, and especially on his own goal to find therapy for diabetes.

Learn more about stem cells:

http://discovery.lifemapsc.com/stem-cell-differentiation

 

Join my Facebook group:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/STEMCELLSNET/

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jacob Blumenthal
Scoop.it!

2013 CSHL Symposium Interview: Dr. Irving Weissman

Jacob Blumenthal's insight:

A great interview with Dr. Irving Weissman about his research and his thoughts on the stem cell field.

Learn more about stem cells:

http://discovery.lifemapsc.com/stem-cell-differentiation

more...
David O'Connell's curator insight, February 6, 2014 4:07 PM
Jacob Blumenthal's insight:

A great interview with Dr. Irving Weissman about his research and his thoughts on the stem cell field.

Learn more about stem cells:

http://discovery.lifemapsc.com/stem-cell-differentiation

Scooped by Jacob Blumenthal
Scoop.it!

Breakthrough in Stem Cell Research: The Derivation of Novel Human Ground-State Naive Pluripotent Stem Cells

Breakthrough in Stem Cell Research: The Derivation of Novel Human Ground-State Naive Pluripotent Stem Cells | Stem Cells & Tissue Engineering | Scoop.it
Jacob Blumenthal's insight:

Formation of the naive epiblast in the mammalian embryo occurs several days after fertilization. The zygote initially undergoes division and after a fixed number of cell cycles, the inner blastomeres generate the inner cell mass (ICM), while those on the periphery begin to form the trophoblast. The resulting structure is called the blastocyst.
The ICM produces the hypoblast, a second extraembryonic lineage, and at approximately the same time, the inner cells develop into a pluripotent epiblast.
The epiblast constitutes the ground state, namely, a fully unrestricted pluripotent cell population that harbors the developmental potential and flexibility to produce all embryonic lineages. At this point, embryonic stem cells (ESCs), an immortalized representation of the naïve epiblast, can be derived.
Under appropriate conditions, ESCs exhibit an unlimited...

 

Read the full story in our newsletter:  

http://us4.campaign-archive1.com/?u=985051700e9649000fa0c0d4a&id=294091ea20&e=f7779dc7fe

 

more...
Joe Riggs's comment, February 2, 2014 1:48 PM
Jacob, I am a big fan of naive pluripotency as technically superior to primed human pluripotent stem cells. i argue that the field will eventually settle here as the optimal growth conditions for increased efficiency in scale-up and stable propagation.<br><br>While having clonal advantage and decreased heterogeneity are benefits, the limitation may end up being the high cost of LIF. LIF as I have priced it is nearly 10x to fgf. Does anybody know why LIF is so expensive.<br><br>also, academic discussion on the benefit of naive vs primed pluripotent stem cells is encouraged as I'd like to know what you and others think about the benefits of naive pluripotency and should we move faster to establish and adopt these culture conditions.
Scooped by Jacob Blumenthal
Scoop.it!

Stem cells and the transformative power of hope: Bernard Siegel at TEDxDelrayBeach - YouTube

Bernie was a courtroom attorney, and a cancer and Hurricane Andrew survivor. For fun, he owned a minor league basketball team and became commissioner of a pr...
Jacob Blumenthal's insight:

A great and interesting talk!! Highly recommended!

 

Learn more about stem cells:

http://discovery.lifemapsc.com/stem-cell-differentiation

 

Join my Facebook group for more stem cell scoops:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/STEMCELLSNET/

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jacob Blumenthal
Scoop.it!

Could Growing Patient Stem Cells on a Synthetic Scaffold Slash Organ Transplant Waiting Lists? | MIT Technology Review

Could Growing Patient Stem Cells on a Synthetic Scaffold Slash Organ Transplant Waiting Lists?  | MIT Technology Review | Stem Cells & Tissue Engineering | Scoop.it
Jacob Blumenthal's insight:

This review describes the work of a bioscience spin-off company called Harvard Apparatus Regenerative Technology, or HART in designing and production of polymeric scaffolds for organ replacement.

Come and learn about sem cells:

http://discovery.lifemapsc.com/stem-cell-differentiation

 

more...
Christopher Duntsch's curator insight, February 13, 2014 1:23 AM

This is not a new concept that should be aggressively developed and pursued.  Their are two tracks upon which this concept is traveling. One track is to artificially create in vitro a 3D scaffold for this purpose using current scaffold and matrix technology.  The second is to harvest organs or tissues and modify them in vitro for tissue engineering applications. A tissue is harvested, and biochemical and biophysical methodology are used to completely remove all of the donor tissue's biomaterial, with one exception. The final product is a shell of the former, and consists of the natural scaffold the tissue or organ originally possessed.  It is then used in vitro to build a new organ or tissue,  by seeding it with stem cells and other byproducts  over time, until a new organ or tissue is created for use in humans as part of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine approaches. Immunobiology and immunoreactivity are less of a challenge to overcome here because: the natural scaffold is not immunoreactive, and chemical modifications during preparation of the scaffold are even more protective; most stem cells that might be strategic for this approach demonstrate immunoprivilige or biology that suppresses immunoreactions; and finally, because this approach is one in which a patient's own stem cells would be a good donor source.

Scooped by Jacob Blumenthal
Scoop.it!

Clonal culturing of human embryonic stem cells on laminin-521/E-cadherin matrix in defined and xeno-free environment : Nature Communications

Jacob Blumenthal's insight:

Researchers from the Karolinska Institute have developed a robust culturing method, that will allow large scale production of human embryonic stem cells of high clinical quality.

http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2014/140127/ncomms4195/full/ncomms4195.html


*Join my Facebook group: 

  https://www.facebook.com/groups/STEMCELLSNET/

 

*Learn about stem cells:

  http://discovery.lifemapsc.com/stem-cell-differentiation

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jacob Blumenthal
Scoop.it!

Stem Cell Reports - Characterization of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cell Sheets Aiming for Clinical Application

Jacob Blumenthal's insight:

Researchers generated retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell sheets from human pluripotent stem cells under optimized conditions, to meet clinical use requirements. These RPE cells expressed specific RPE markers and were further used in transplantation experiments in animal models.

http://www.cell.com/stem-cell-reports/abstract/S2213-6711(13)00175-6

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Come and learn about stem cells:

http://discovery.lifemapsc.com/stem-cell-differentiation

 

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jacob Blumenthal
Scoop.it!

Pluristem stem cell trial to treat muscle injury meets main goal | Reuters

Pluristem stem cell trial to treat muscle injury meets main goal | Reuters | Stem Cells & Tissue Engineering | Scoop.it
Jacob Blumenthal's insight:

Pluristem had announced that their placenta-derived stem cell product showed promising results in a clinical trial for the treatment of muscle injury.

more...
Scooped by Jacob Blumenthal
Scoop.it!

Open position @LifeMap Sciences - Senior Sales Manager (located in the US)

Send your c.v to jacobb@lifemapsc.com

Jacob Blumenthal's insight:

Job Description
LifeMap Sciences, Inc., a subsidiary of BioTime, Inc. (NYSE: BTX), is a California-based startup with an R&D center in Israel whose core technology and business is based on its proprietary Integrated Biomedical Knowledgebase and discovery platform for biomedical research, which includes GeneCards®: the leading human gene database (www.genecards.org); LifeMap Discovery™, the database of embryonic development, stem cell research and regenerative medicine (discovery.lifemapsc.com); and MalaCards, the human disease database (www.malacards.org). LifeMap's products are used by more than 2 million users including academia, research hospitals, patent offices, and leading biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies.


We are seeking a highly motivated individual who enjoys working in early stage companies and looks forward to doing whatever it takes to grow the business. Your priority will be to maximize sales of our products and services, working with our R&D and management team to achieve your targets, and assuming responsibility for all our existing US-based accounts. This is a unique opportunity to become a key part of an innovative, fast-paced Internet/BioTech company and grow with us. The potential for this position is unlimited with a strong base salary and uncapped commission structure.
You must have prior software and/or services sales experience in the life sciences industry (pharma, biotech and academic) with a successful sales record.
This position requires travelling to customer sites within the United States as well as periodical international travel. Preference will be given to candidates in the vicinity New Jersey, Boston, DC and California.

 

Roles & Responsibilities:
• Identify and actively pursue client relationships and opportunities with existing and new accounts, negotiate contracts and close orders to achieve sales targets
• Manage customer relationships, cultivate deep partnerships and create demand for our products
• Work closely with other members of the management team to ensure long-term customer satisfaction
• Contribute to the growth of the company by being a team player willing to help out beyond the sales role
• Record all sales activities in sales database


Preferred Skills:
• Successful track in exceeding or achieving sales targets
• Degree or equivalent in Life Sciences (biology, chemistry)
• Established relationships in pharma and/or biotech accounts
• Experience working in an entrepreneurial environment
• Driven, proactive and highly motivated
• Excellent communication, presentation and interpersonal skills
• Excellent time management stills
• Excellent negotiation skills
• Flexibility to work outside of normal office hours
• Solid computer skills (MS Word, Excel, Power point)

 

Send your c.v to jacobb@lifemapsc.com

 

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jacob Blumenthal
Scoop.it!

Marrying tissue engineering with systems biology - MIT News Office

Marrying tissue engineering with systems biology - MIT News Office | Stem Cells & Tissue Engineering | Scoop.it
Linda Griffith combines in vitro models with deep molecular analysis to accelerate drug discovery.
Jacob Blumenthal's insight:

This news post discuss the work of Linda Griffith, professor of biological and mechanical engineering, who directs the Barrier-Immune-Organ: MIcrophysiology, Microenvironment Engineered TIssue Construct Systems (BIO-MIMETICS) program initiated by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).  According to Griffith, DARPA's vision is to replicate all 10 human physiological systems on a single research platform to allow researchers to study the  crosstalk between these systems.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jacob Blumenthal
Scoop.it!

Yamanaka takes issue with claims STAP cells are safer than iPS option

Yamanaka takes issue with claims STAP cells are safer than iPS option | Stem Cells & Tissue Engineering | Scoop.it
Nobel Prize-winning scientist Shinya Yamanaka, facing reporters in Kyoto, decried 'three misconceptions' about the induced pluripotent stem, or iPS, cells that he developed in relation to STAP cells were recently ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jacob Blumenthal
Scoop.it!

Five Israeli Biotech Companies That Look to Change Medicine Through Stem Cell Research

Five Israeli Biotech Companies That Look to Change Medicine Through Stem Cell Research | Stem Cells & Tissue Engineering | Scoop.it
A look at medical companies that currently stand at the forefront of stem cell technology and regenerative medicine
Jacob Blumenthal's insight:

Join my group on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/STEMCELLSNET/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jacob Blumenthal
Scoop.it!

Decellularized thymus scaffolds for thymus tissue engineering - John Jackson

Jacob Blumenthal's insight:

A very interesting talk by John Jackson from Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine on tissue engineering of the thymus using decellularized thymus scaffolds.

 

Stem Cells and Tissue Engineering scoops also in Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/STEMCELLSNET/

 

 

more...
Christopher Duntsch's curator insight, February 13, 2014 1:22 AM

This is not a new concept that should be aggressively developed and pursued.  Their are two tracks upon which this concept is traveling. One track is to artificially create in vitro a 3D scaffold for this purpose using current scaffold and matrix technology.  The second is to harvest organs or tissues and modify them in vitro for tissue engineering applications. A tissue is harvested, and biochemical and biophysical methodology are used to completely remove all of the donor tissue's biomaterial, with one exception. The final product is a shell of the former, and consists of the natural scaffold the tissue or organ originally possessed.  It is then used in vitro to build a new organ or tissue,  by seeding it with stem cells and other byproducts  over time, until a new organ or tissue is created for use in humans as part of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine approaches. Immunobiology and immunoreactivity are less of a challenge to overcome here because: the natural scaffold is not immunoreactive, and chemical modifications during preparation of the scaffold are even more protective; most stem cells that might be strategic for this approach demonstrate immunoprivilige or biology that suppresses immunoreactions; and finally, because this approach is one in which a patient's own stem cells would be a good donor source.

Scooped by Jacob Blumenthal
Scoop.it!

Why I’m Sure Testing Induced Stem Cells in Humans Will Be Safe

Why I’m Sure Testing Induced Stem Cells in Humans Will Be Safe | Stem Cells & Tissue Engineering | Scoop.it

Masayo Takahashi is at the Riken Center for Developmental Biology in Kobe, Japan, where she heads the Laboratory for Retinal Regeneration and is planning a pilot safety study using a type of stem cell to treat age-related blindness. Natasha Little: Later this year, you will make history when you begin...

Jacob Blumenthal's insight:

This is an interview with Masayo Takahashi about the first ever human clinical trial of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC). In this clinical trial skin cells will be taken from age-related macular degeneration patients, and will be reprogrammed into iPSC. These iPSC will be then differentiated into retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells in-vitro. The differentiated cells will be introduced back to the eyes of the patients.

Learn more about RPE cells:

http://discovery.lifemapsc.com/in-vivo-development/eye/retinal-pigmented-epithelium/mature-retinal-pigmented-epithelium-cells


Learn more about stem cells differentiation:

http://discovery.lifemapsc.com/stem-cell-differentiation


more...
Christopher Duntsch's curator insight, February 7, 2014 8:36 AM

I think it is worthwhile to be more specific with blogs and statements. Stem cells are are not all the same. I would prefer as discussed below "Why I'm sure Testing induced IPSCs will be safe" Most with some background recognize that induced means IPSCs. But likely in blog context very few.

 

Embryonic stem cells have great potential, but tag along issues and concerns. Further, they are not proven as therapeutics in any venue to a such a degree that safety, efficacy, cell pharmacobiolgy are a given and human studies inevitably, even if the issue was not in part FDA restrictions. Generally speaking their role for tissue engineering for a given disease, is not define. What is defined is complete competency for growth and differentiation potential that is unlimited. That is certainly exciting, but that is just a start. Were we discussing a novel cancer drug this early in development it would not even be on the radar. For ESCs it is the potential that lies ahead that generates the excitement.,


Adult stem cells are further along in all aspects including clinical studies and applications. They are indeed safe and there has never been evidence otherwise. These days it seems every nextgen biotech or group is using a every stem cell for every purpose without rationale or basis. Indeed, it sometimes looks like like a mix and match with more approaches then successes. Nonetheless, despite two decades of great researcher that goes by to Weisman et al. in the early 90s, these cells only get the attention they deserve because in the appropriate venue they constantly produce. Stem cells work well when used in tissues from which they were derived. Adult stem cells are a prevent entity. 

 

I have no interest at this time in STAPs and will let others provide the proof of concept with actual R&D and developmental research to put these stem cells on my radar.

 

Regarding IPSCs, biology behind the induction of a human pluriopotent stem cell is indeed remarkable and has led to a much better understanding of underlying biology. On the one hand I think that sometimes we forget that half of why so much excitement revolves around them is the fact that ESCs can be avoided.  This an issue for some because the NIH will not fund ESC research  in general, and thus this bypassed a big problem.  For others because of the ethical issues that exist here given one's respective perspective. But I don't know we can say much about these cell just yet beyond the what we know from early studies and modeling. To think that we can approximate the infinitely complex biology of ESCs is ridiculous. To think that the artificial biology induced in an aged somatic cell with telomere biology associated with aging, with more exposure to toxins and DNA damaging agents simply because it its has been here longer and exposed more frequently (such as sunburns, much less real oncogenic toxins), and to think that he biology itself is definitive, retains the same developmental biology programs and patterns as ESCs of blastocyst development in uteror,  is not possible to say just yet as a historical fact.  

 

In the long term, IPSCs may not be the best choice for regenerative medicine. These stem cells, need years of research, long term outcomes studies, understanding of genomic stabity and phenotypic stability, and simply put much more developmental R&D. I am not putting any negativity into IPSC approaches. I just have always been more comfortable with naturally occurring stem cell sources whose biology is well understood. If one day that meant ESCs research may need to supported in this respect so be it. Time and understanding will get us there eventually. 

 

Nonetheless, I will be glad to see the data begin to stack up from more  and more animal and human studies with IPSCs and the truth of what lies in the future for IPSCs is in theses studies, not in opinons.

 

Scooped by Jacob Blumenthal
Scoop.it!

A combinatorial cell-laden gel microarray for inducing osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells : Scientific Reports

A combinatorial cell-laden gel microarray for inducing osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells : Scientific Reports | Stem Cells & Tissue Engineering | Scoop.it
Jacob Blumenthal's insight:

In this open-access paper, the authors describe a novel method of screening for  microenvironments that direct  osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. 

http://www.nature.com/srep/2014/140129/srep03896/full/srep03896.html


Learn more about mesenchymal stem cells:

http://discovery.lifemapsc.com/in-vivo-development/mesenchymal-stem-cells

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jacob Blumenthal
Scoop.it!

For the first time: new hair fom stem cells

Jacob Blumenthal's insight:

Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania have developed a novel method for generation of epithelial stem cells (EpSCs)  from human pluripotent stem cells. These EpSCs are capable of generating all hair follicle lineages including the hair shaft, and the inner and outer root sheaths in skin reconstitution assays.

http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2014/140128/ncomms4071/full/ncomms4071.html

 

Learn about hair development:

http://discovery.lifemapsc.com/in-vivo-development/hair

 

Join my Facebook group for more stem cell scoops:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/STEMCELLSNET/

 

more...
Carlos Garcia Pando's comment, January 31, 2014 4:30 PM
After several millenia of magic cures and useless remedies I can't believe all those bold headed people will at last have a chance.
Scooped by Jacob Blumenthal
Scoop.it!

Stimulus-triggered fate conversion of somatic cells into pluripotency - Nature

Jacob Blumenthal's insight:

Researchers from Harvard medical school, report on a new method for generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC). This method is termed stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency or STAP. The researchers suggest that a strong external stimuli such as a transient low-pH stressor can induce reprogramming of mammalian somatic cells, into  pluripotent cells. This could be a very big breakthrough in generation of iPSCS, that until now required nuclear transfer or introduction of transcription factors.

Reference: http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v505/n7485/full/nature12968.html

 

Leran more about stem cells:

http://discovery.lifemapsc.com/stem-cell-differentiation

 

Join my Facebook group for more stem cell scoops:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/STEMCELLSNET/

 

more...
Christopher Duntsch's curator insight, January 31, 2014 8:18 PM

This is fascinating and also just bizarre. Human Pluripotent Stem Cells by defintition iare getting more complex, more random. That does not mean the biology is not there, the approach does not work, but I am most happy when stem cell approaches are well studied, well defined, and rigorous. I do not think much of ESCs or IPSCs (or MSCs) for many reasons both obvious and subtle, but the stem cell biology is amazing. I remember when the first nature article was reported where skin cells were injected with OCT4, NANOG, STAT3, KLM5, and CMyc? That event led to the hypothesis that ESC biology was held in the master transcriptional regulators, especially NOS and NOS genes.  Then other approaches accomplished the same, such as simple epigenetic engineering. Small molecuale induction, culture conditions with modificatoins, etc. But this is just wild.I have not seen the article, and I am sure they do a good job explaining their results, but off the cuff I cannot imagine how this works. Acidic pH is not a strong stressor in my opinion, and I cannot extropolate biology from in vivo modeling to help me think about this (except intradiscal), but it is quite striking if true. Indeed, it is almost as if all those times while culturing cells and forgetting to change the media (with a drop in pH), I was making IPSCs. (bad humor) My only comment is to not get to excited just yet because they do not do much other than some basic assays to show ESC biology occuring.  A good start though. But still an unexpected and exciting response. I wish I had thought of that!

Scooped by Jacob Blumenthal
Scoop.it!

California’s stem cell agency poised to bet big on genomics research | State | SanLuisObispo.com

California’s stem cell agency poised to bet big on genomics research | State | SanLuisObispo.com | Stem Cells & Tissue Engineering | Scoop.it
The state of California is preparing to make a bet of up to $40 million on a fast-moving field that promises to revolutionize medicine and ultimately lead to personalized stem cell treatments that can be tailored for a patient’s genetic makeup.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jacob Blumenthal
Scoop.it!

Trends in Biotechnology - Small-molecule based musculoskeletal regenerative engineering - open access

Jacob Blumenthal's insight:

This open-access review describes various small molecules-based regenerative approaches  for bone, cartilage, and ligament formation. It also describes small molecule-based strategies for peripheral nerve regeneration.

http://www.cell.com/trends/biotechnology/fulltext/S0167-7799(13)00253-9

 

Learn  about stem cell differentiation:

http://discovery.lifemapsc.com/stem-cell-differentiation

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jacob Blumenthal
Scoop.it!

Tiny swimming bio-bots boldly go where no bot has swum before

Tiny swimming bio-bots boldly go where no bot has swum before | Stem Cells & Tissue Engineering | Scoop.it
The alien world of aquatic micro-organisms just got new residents: synthetic self-propelled swimming bio-bots.
Jacob Blumenthal's insight:

A team of engineers led by Taher Saif, from the University of Illinois, have developed tiny bio-bots that can swim in viscous fluids of biological environments on their own. The bio-bot body is made from a synthetic polymer, attached to  self organized  cultured cardiomyocytes to form the "motor". When the cardiomyocytes beat together, they send a wave down the tail that propels the bio-bot forward.

http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2014/140117/ncomms4081/full/ncomms4081.html

 

Watch an animation: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RmU4rWq4KGg

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jacob Blumenthal
Scoop.it!

Stem Cell Therapies for Celiac Disease and IBD Now Offered in the United States - PR Web (press release)

Stem Cell Therapies for Celiac Disease and IBD Now Offered in the United States - PR Web (press release) | Stem Cells & Tissue Engineering | Scoop.it
Stem Cell Therapies for Celiac Disease and IBD Now Offered in the United States PR Web (press release) Regenerative Medicine Solutions (RMS), a global provider of stem cell treatments for degenerative diseases, is now offering Regenerative...
Jacob Blumenthal's insight:

Celiac disease is one of the most common diseases in the western world. Therefore, a new therapy is always a blessing.

more...
No comment yet.