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Generation of 3D Skin Equivalents Fully Reconstituted from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs)

Generation of 3D Skin Equivalents Fully Reconstituted from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs) | Stem Cells & Tissue Engineering | Scoop.it
PLOS ONE: an inclusive, peer-reviewed, open-access resource from the PUBLIC LIBRARY OF SCIENCE. Reports of well-performed scientific studies from all disciplines freely available to the whole world.
Jacob Blumenthal's insight:

Researchers from University of Maryland School of Medicine, describe a method for direct differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells into dermal fibroblasts and keratinocytes. In order to test the in vivo functional capacity of the iPSC-derived fibroblasts and keratinocytes, the researchers prformed skin reconstitution chamber assays and were also able to generate in-vitro 3D skin equivalents using another assay .

Taken together, the results  indicates that pluripotent stem cells have the ability to supply a source of both major types of skin cells, and produce an autologous 3D skin equivalent for generating in vitro skin disease models and developing gene and stem cell therapies for both inherited skin diseases.

http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0077673

 

To learn about stem cells and embryonic development:

http://discovery.lifemapsc.com/

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Skin engineering - an interview with Prof. Howard Green

Skin engineering - an interview with Prof. Howard Green | Stem Cells & Tissue Engineering | Scoop.it
Professor Howard Green stumbled across a skin transplant technique that involved growing keratinocytes into full skin layers, making him a pioneer in regenerative medicine.
Jacob Blumenthal's insight:

This is an interview with prof. Howard Green, a regenartive medicine pioneer. During the 70's and early 80's, he and his graduate student James Rheinwald discovered a technique to co-culture fibroblasts and keratinocytes. The results - a thin layer of skin-like tissue that can be transplanted to replace damaged skin tissue. Only later onthey discovered that the keratinocytes included a sub-population of adult stem cells.The presence of stem cells explains why the grafts, transplanted as thin sheets mainly made up of the skin’s upper layer, the epidermis, continue to grow and thicken, adding a deeper layer, the dermis, over ensuing months.

A great story, truely inspiring!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eo7vSI4LiIs

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