Regenerative Veterinary Medicine (Aspect 2) & Veterinarian Acupuncture (Aspect 3)
19 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Macey Marks
Scoop.it!

Veterinary Acupuncture (Aspect 3)

Acupuncture involves the insertion of small gauge needles to various points on the body in order to cause physiological responses in the body. Acupuncture wo...
Macey Marks's insight:

Acupuncture is the stimulation of specific acupoints along the skin of the body involving the penetration of thin needles to various points on the body in order to cause physiological responses. Nerve endings around the acupuncture point are stimulated and nerve fibers become active. These nerve fibers conduct impulses to the brain and spinal cord, causing changes in the body that speed healing. When common medicine does not seem to be working, and surgical options are risky or expensive, animal owners turn to acupuncture so their pets receive the best care.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Macey Marks
Scoop.it!

Pet Acupuncture: An Important Healing Tool (Aspect 3)

Pet Acupuncture: An Important Healing Tool (Aspect 3) | Regenerative Veterinary Medicine (Aspect 2) & Veterinarian Acupuncture (Aspect 3) | Scoop.it
Pet acupuncture is a natural, non-invasive therapy that can help treat various health conditions in pets.
Macey Marks's insight:

There are not many concrete scientific studies that prove the benefits of acupuncture, or the science behind it, but through observing the results of animals treated with acupuncture, it does work. It benefits animals in much the same way it benefits humans. The ideals of western medicine have conditioned us to look for the quick fix. However, holistic and alternative therapies, including acupuncture, have results that are often not seen immediately and require more frequent and longer treatments. With some acupuncture treatments immediate improvement is documented, and with others, repeated treatment may not yield the same results as another patient who has received one treatment. Acupuncture is generally effective with a series of treatments.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Macey Marks
Scoop.it!

Veterinary Acupuncture - How does it work? (Aspect 3)

Veterinary Acupuncture - How does it work? (Aspect 3) | Regenerative Veterinary Medicine (Aspect 2) & Veterinarian Acupuncture (Aspect 3) | Scoop.it
Check out http://acupuncture4animals.com! Acupuncture For Animals
Macey Marks's insight:

Chinese people researched, discovered, and mapped 173 points in animals called Shu-xu. These points are used as a guide as where to place needles during an acupuncture treatment. Modern studies show that stimulating these points releases beta-endorphin, serotonin, and other neurotransmitters. Acupuncture is well established for pain relief, and is documented to benefit in treating seizures, hormonal imbalances, diarrhea, cough, allergies, kidney disease, and asthma.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Macey Marks
Scoop.it!

Pets On Pins And Needles (Aspect 3)

Pets On Pins And Needles (Aspect 3) | Regenerative Veterinary Medicine (Aspect 2) & Veterinarian Acupuncture (Aspect 3) | Scoop.it
Acupuncture Seems To Help Some Animals
Macey Marks's insight:

CBS News investigates the validity and effectiveness of acupuncture as a treat for animals. They acknowledge the use of acupuncture for human use, and do not dismiss the fact that animals can benefit as well. Using acupuncture on animals has been shown to lessen the effects of arthritis, calm allergic reactions, and even treat kidney disease. Acupuncture can take longer to see results and can be more expensive than conventional medical therapies, but seem to be worth it in the success story shared in the article. A dog with severe, red, hot skin allergies was reported, by the owner, to be 90% improved after one treatment of acupuncture. The basic principles of acupuncture are the same in animals as with humans. Chinese medicine says that disease is the result of a blockage in energy flow along pathways in the body called meridians. Inserting needles into these pathways unblocks the energy and restores health.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Macey Marks
Scoop.it!

What is Veterinary Acupuncture? (Aspect 3)

Macey Marks's insight:

"Acupuncture may be defined as the insertion of needles into specific points on the body to produce a healing response." Every acupuncture point is placed in an area to stimulate an action. The Chinese also used acupuncture as preventative medicine. Acupuncture is primarily used for problems involving paralysis, noninfectious inflammation, and pain. Small animals reap the benefits of acupuncture mostly from musculoskeletal problems such as arthritis, intervertebral disk disease, or traumatic nerve injury, respiratory problems, skin, gastrointestinal, and selective reproductive problems. Large animals use acupuncture in all the same areas as small, except neurological problems such as facial paralysis can be treated.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Macey Marks
Scoop.it!

Stem Cell Regenerative Therapy in Veterinary Medicine

Stem Cell Regenerative Therapy in Veterinary Medicine | Regenerative Veterinary Medicine (Aspect 2) & Veterinarian Acupuncture (Aspect 3) | Scoop.it
Stem cells have been in the news in recent years because they can grow and differentiate into many types of cell types. For cells originating from human embryos, there are many ethical and legal debates about usage of these cells. Scientists are now focusing on adult stem cells; cells from adult animals that do not harm the animal to procure the cells. Treatment potential spans many types of diseases and injury. Learn more in this article on stem cell therapy in animals.
Macey Marks's insight:

The first stem cells were derived from adipose to treat injured racehorses. Adipose tissue is used because it is easily and safely collected in large concentrations from the animal hosts. Today, a licensed stem cell serviced called Vet-Stem uses stem cells from adipose tissue to treat both horses and dogs. Treatment of injured racehorses began with adipose-derived stem cells.

Only veterinarians credited by Vet-Stem can perform the collection of adipose tissue. Two tablespoons of adipose are collected surgically from places high in fat such as the stomach. The sample is shipped to the Vet-Stem laboratory where they extract the stem cells from the adipose tissue then ship back the stem cells and adipose. In only three days, the veterinary injects the stem cells into the injured patient to start the healing process. At this time stem cells are used for joint, ligament, and bone injuries in dogs and horses. The future holds much promise for regenerative stem cell medicine to help other diseases such as liver, kidney, heart, and neurologic and immune-mediated diseases.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Macey Marks
Scoop.it!

The science behind Adipose derived Stem Cells

"MediVet America is the a leader in Veterinary Medicine and provides stem cell therapy for Dog Arthritis, Horse Tendon Ligament Injuries and more.

Macey Marks's insight:

Adult Stem Cells, or ASC, that are found in adipose tissue can develop into different cell types such as cartilage, bone, and muscle. In an animal body cells can be induced into endothelium, pancreatic cells, bone, myocardium, liver and neural cells given the right condition. Adipose, or fat tissues, are harvested from cats and dogs from the thorax of falciform area and harvested with a liposuction technique for horses. After ASCs are transplanted into a tissue environment different from their own changes begin to occur. Horses only need to be under a sedative when harvesting the stem cells, however small animals require general anesthesia. Using patented Medistem™ enzymes, the tissue is broken down, filtered for cleanliness, and sterilized with a mild antibiotic. Compared to previous methods of stem cell therapies that relied on difficult and painful bone marrow collection, easily harvested first generation stem cells are a superior alternative. Bone marrow derived stem cells can take weeks to culture to therapeutic levels. "Autologous transplant of adipose-derived stem cells poses an extremely low risk to the patient when completed under strict aseptic conditions." These transplants are belived to be the most effective treatment against osteoarthritis, tendon injury, ligament injury and fractures. Most of the adipose-derived stem cells that are removed from fat tissue are dormant, non-dividing state. To be activated in the body after plantation, low-level light photoactivation can be utilized in the stimulant of growth factors, cytokines, and proliferation. The repair mechanism must be activated in order to make the stem cells circulate in the body and start dividing into new tissue cells. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Macey Marks
Scoop.it!

Canine patient requirements for stem cell treatment

Canine patient requirements for stem cell treatment | Regenerative Veterinary Medicine (Aspect 2) & Veterinarian Acupuncture (Aspect 3) | Scoop.it
Macey Marks's insight:

1) A health assessment within the last six months that proved good general health

2) Lab tests such as CBC, Chemistry Profile, U/A, T4, and tick titers provided

3) Diagnosis of injury/disease confirmed with radiographs and x-rays

4) Confirmed labeled use of flea and tick control, or screenings for tick borne diseases prior to treatment

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Macey Marks
Scoop.it!

Differences in regenerative medicine compared to traditional methods:

Vet-Stem Regenerative Medicine uses a concentrated form of autologous adipose-derived adult stem cells to treat traumatic and degenerative diseases, including bowed tendons, ligament injuries, osteoarthritis, and osteochondral defects in horses, dogs and cats.

Macey Marks's insight:

Regenerative medicine does not rely on a single receptor or a single pathway in order to work. It can be delivered two ways: directly to the infected area or systematically through the disease itself. The cells used can differentiate into many tissue types, induce repair, and stimulate regeneration. Through paracrine and auto modalities the regenerative cells  communicate with the cells of their local environment. This creates an optimal environment for natural healing. Regenerative cells produce both secreted and cell surface substances that regulate tissue growth, integrity, and function.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Macey Marks
Scoop.it!

Vet-Stem Cell Therapy: Arthritis in Dogs & Cats | Tendons, Ligaments & Joints in Horses

Vet-Stem Cell Therapy: Arthritis in Dogs & Cats | Tendons, Ligaments & Joints in Horses | Regenerative Veterinary Medicine (Aspect 2) & Veterinarian Acupuncture (Aspect 3) | Scoop.it
Vet-Stem provides veterinarians and owners with a way to treat dogs, horses and cats with the animal’s own stem cells from a small sample of fat for arthritis and tendon and ligament injuries. Stem cells can also be stored as insurance for the future.
Macey Marks's insight:

Vet-Stem Cell Therapy for Arthritis in Dogs & Cats:

More than 80% of dogs, old and young, with arthritis have improved quality of life. Dogs on pain medication have significantly decreased their need for the medication after the Vet-Stem treatment. There is Stem Cell Therapy in development for inflammatory bowel disease, kidney disease in cats, immune mediated diseases, and heart diseases. Stem Cells should not be used as treatment for caner or systemic infection.

 

Vet-Stem Cell Therapy for Horses:

Stem Cell Therapy for horses can be used for horses with arthritis, a tendon injury, or a ligament injury. Horses with suspensory ligament injuries have reported that 76% have returned to full work, 77% of tendon injuries have returned to full work, and 57% of horses with joint disease have returned to full work. There is Stem Cell Therapy in development for laminitis, uveitis, and COPD.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Macey Marks
Scoop.it!

Our Services:Veterinary Acupuncture - Mountain Shadow Veterinary Hospital (Aspect 3)

Our Services:Veterinary Acupuncture - Mountain Shadow Veterinary Hospital (Aspect 3) | Regenerative Veterinary Medicine (Aspect 2) & Veterinarian Acupuncture (Aspect 3) | Scoop.it
We offer veterinary acupuncture to treat sick or injured pets, especially those with chronic health problems such as arthritis and joint disease.
Macey Marks's insight:

This website is run by the Mountain Shadow Veterinary Hospital and it currently providing veterinary acupuncture for their patients. The most common use of acupuncture is to treat sick or injured pets with chronic conditions. The use of acupuncture can stimulate nerves, increase blood circulation, relieve muscle spasms, and cause the release of hormones such as endorphins or cortisol, which are the body's natural pain control hormone and a natural steroid. Although acupuncture is not a "cure-all," it can be used to treat specific aliments such as musculoskeletal, skin, respiratory, gastrointestinal, and reproductive problems. It can also be used in combination with medicine to aid in healing. Acupuncture is virtually painless, and most animals relax or even sleep during a thirty-minute treatment. It is a very safe form of medical treatment when administered by a properly trained veterinarian.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Macey Marks
Scoop.it!

Dog-upuncture: Treating Pets With Human Medicine (Aspect 3)

Dog-upuncture: Treating Pets With Human Medicine (Aspect 3) | Regenerative Veterinary Medicine (Aspect 2) & Veterinarian Acupuncture (Aspect 3) | Scoop.it
There is a growing movement to treat animals with the best human treatments.
Macey Marks's insight:

Modern medicine for humans is always advancing and causing wonderful results. The idea to treat animals with the best that human medicine has to offer, including physical therapy, hydro-therapy, and even alternative therapies -- acupuncture, to be precise -- is a growing movement. However, there is a lot of skepticism among pet owners and veterinarians. Veterinarians believe that there is no science behind it to prove that sticking animals with tiny needles is a good practice of medicine. "David Ramey helped shape the guidelines for alternative therapies for animal treatment plans for the American Veterinary Medical Association and said the root of the issue is "there is no consensus" on if acupuncture has any effect on the animal's health."

 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Macey Marks
Scoop.it!

Acupuncture (Aspect 3)

Acupuncture (Aspect 3) | Regenerative Veterinary Medicine (Aspect 2) & Veterinarian Acupuncture (Aspect 3) | Scoop.it

ACUPUNCTURE VET & HOLISTIC VET - VETERINARY ACUPUNCTURE for all species ARTHRITIS, BACK, PARALYSIS, WOBBLER, ERU, SPONDYLOSIS, DYSPLASIA, holistic and integrated medicine - AVMC

Macey Marks's insight:

Today, some people see acupuncture as a model for holistic medicine. The theory behind acupuncture is rooted from Chinese culture, though some practitioners shun this route. Through the Chinese model, energy is perceived to flow through the body in meridians or channels. These channels are related to the internal organs and the channels can sometimes be disrupted. With acupuncture, the needles reach those meridians and create the flow of energy that was missing. After the energy, or Qi, is flowing again, natural body healing hormones and released which aid to a speedy recovery.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Macey Marks
Scoop.it!

Old Dog, New Trick: Acupuncture - New York Times (Aspect 3)

Old Dog, New Trick: Acupuncture - New York Times (Aspect 3) | Regenerative Veterinary Medicine (Aspect 2) & Veterinarian Acupuncture (Aspect 3) | Scoop.it
See Otto mope. See Otto pricked with needles. See Otto go!
Macey Marks's insight:

This article is about a dog who was very energetic and spunky as a young dog, but contracted arthritis and was very slow and not himself as an old dog. The owners had never thought about acupuncture treatments before until they were on a walk one day and saw an older dog like theirs behaving like a young dog. A quick chat with the owner led them to research about animal acupuncture. After finding an acupuncturist and starting treatment, their dog did not seem to be improving. However, after the fifth treatment the owners took their dog to his favorite park and he ran, swam, jumped, and played like his good old days. The owners aren't sure if it was the acupuncture that did it because there were other factors involved, but it did help reduce swelling at his joints. One thing the acupuncturist said about skepticism of her work was, "I've never seen acupuncture hurt a dog."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Macey Marks
Scoop.it!

Animal Acupuncture (Aspect 3)

Macey Marks's insight:

ASPECT 3

Acupuncture originated in China where the Chinese regularly practiced on horses, then gradually experimented on other farm animals, dogs, cats, and birds. Acupuncture is healing work focused around bio-energy or Qi. Acupuncture unblocks Qi energy and releases endorphins and hormones to boost the immune system and promote self-healing. It also decreases inflammation both internally and externally.

Areas that respond favorably to acupuncture:

Musculo-skeletal, gynecological, male reproductive, hormonal, neurological/psychological, dermatological, and performance.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Macey Marks
Scoop.it!

Why Use Adipose-Derived Stem Cells?Demonstrated Efficacy of Regenerative Medicine

Why Use Adipose-Derived Stem Cells?Demonstrated Efficacy of Regenerative Medicine | Regenerative Veterinary Medicine (Aspect 2) & Veterinarian Acupuncture (Aspect 3) | Scoop.it
Macey Marks's insight:

"Stem Cells are multipotent and can differentiate into tendon, ligament, bone, cartilage, cardiac, nerve, muscle, blood vessels, fat, and liver tissue. The stromal fraction that is harvested from adipose tissue is a heterogeneous mixture of regenerative cells." 

Adipose-derived regenerative cells are a readily available source. The harvesting area is large and easy to get to. They can be collected in far greater concentrations than those from bone marrow. They are able to differentiate into multiple lineages implicating their potential in bone, cartilage, and cardiac repair. This is shown in the picture above. Lastly, when parts of adipose tissue are isolated, they are found to contain a heterogeneous mixture of regenerative cells. These include Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), Endothelial progenitor cells, Pericytes, Immune cells, fibroblasts, and other growth factor-secreting bioactive cells. These are the cells used to culture new tissue and be injected into a patient for healing.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Macey Marks
Scoop.it!

Canine Stem Cell Therapy - The Center for Regenerative Medicine at VOSM

Canine Stem Cell Therapy - The Center for Regenerative Medicine at VOSM | Regenerative Veterinary Medicine (Aspect 2) & Veterinarian Acupuncture (Aspect 3) | Scoop.it
VOSM's Center For Regenerative Medicine provides stem cell therapy and platelet-rich plasma treatments for small animals with orthopedic and neurological conditions.
Macey Marks's insight:

"The Orthobiologic Innovations Center for Regenerative Medicine had been providing stem cell therpy and platelet-rich plasma cell treatments to patients since 2008." The center uses regenerative medicine for treating soft tissue injuries, osteoarthritis, and neurological conditions. Some of the neurological conditions in dogs the center treats for are Atlanto-axial Instability/Luxation, Wobbler Disease, Intervertebral Disc Disease, Lumbosacral Disease, Spinal Cord Trauma, Stroke and Cancer/Tumors. For issues with cancer and tumors, the vets at the Center can perform limb sparing procedures which are an alternative to amputation. Another option is Fluoroscopically-Guided bone biopsy to obtain real-time images of internal structures which greatly improved the accuracy of incisions and limited surgical trauma. With spinal cord trauma, treatment may include supportive care, pain managment, and surgery in cases where the stability of the spine is compromised.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Macey Marks
Scoop.it!

Basic science and clinical application of stem cells in veterinary medicine

PubMed comprises more than 23 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.
Macey Marks's insight:

Research in Stem Cell Therapy enhance veterinary medicine in different ways. Some stem cells therapies are still being developed while others are in current use. Animals are being used for models to study potential properties of stem cells for application of human medicine. In the emerging field of stem cell research, human and veterinary medicine are tied to each other. 

WIth cooperation of the human and veterinary scientific fields, most innovations are achieved. Embryonic stem cells, or ES, are mainly performed in animals, and have potential to adapt to any tissue type of the body. ES have an exceptionally prolonged culture because of their ability of self renewal.

ES cells have only been recovered and maintained from non-human primates and mouse and horse blastocysts. Scientists have successed in growing bovine cells in primary culture, and have reported ES cells derived from mink, rabbit, chicken, and pigs. Due to their vivo teratogenic degeneration clinincal applications of ES are not possible. "The potential to form a teratoma consisting of tissues from all three germ lines even serves as a definitive in vivo test for ES cells." Any postnatal organisms that stem cells are obtained from are defined as adult stem cells. Adult haematopoietic stem cells possess a more limited plasticity compared too embryonic counterparts. Embryonic cells are believed to serve as a source to maintain tissue and organ mass during cell turnover in adult individuals. In the case of veterinary medicine, adult stem cells are perfered becuase of their potential in regenerative medicine. Experiecnce and information gained from animal patients stem cell therapy and research serve as a precursor for human medicine. Using haematopietic stem cells in animal therapy are not common because of the monetary and animals welfare reasons. Regenerative medicine for treatment of acute injuries and chronic disorders are becoming clinical routine. Therefore, embryonic or adult tissues are in the focus of veterinary medicine and research.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Macey Marks
Scoop.it!

William R. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital

William R. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital | Regenerative Veterinary Medicine (Aspect 2) & Veterinarian Acupuncture (Aspect 3) | Scoop.it
Macey Marks's insight:

Different types of Cell Processing:

Bone Marrow Expansion and Return is when bone marrow is isolated to expand mesenchymal stem cells. One dose is kept by the animals veterinarian and another three are stored for future use.

Equine Umbilical Cord Blood or Cord Tissue is where blood or tissue from the umbilical cord of a new born foal is concentrated and stored. It can also be expanded like the bone marrow tissue.

Canine and Equine Fat Tissue is adipose tissue harvested from the stromal vascular fraction. Portions of this sample can be sent to a clinic for testing, a veterinarian for therapy, or processed and stored for future use. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Macey Marks
Scoop.it!

Stem Cells as Therapies | California's Stem Cell Agency

Stem Cells as Therapies | California's Stem Cell Agency | Regenerative Veterinary Medicine (Aspect 2) & Veterinarian Acupuncture (Aspect 3) | Scoop.it

"Stem cells have the potential to treat a wide range of diseases, including diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, spinal cord injury, and heart disease. Learn why these cells are such a powerful tool for treating disease as well as what the current hurdles are before new therapies can become available"

Macey Marks's insight:

How can stem cells treat disease?

Stem cell transplant is the most common form of therapy. Stem cells in the embryonic stage are differentiated into the necessary cel type and replace damaged cells. The list of tissue the stem cells can repair include any tissue that is injured or diseased. Not only are these embryonic cells used in stem cell transplants, but they are also being studied to help provide clues to what factors  lead to musclse or other tissues to repair itself. The studying of developing cells can be used to study disease, indentify new drugs, or screen drugs for side effects. All these advancements would lead to an impact on human health.

more...
No comment yet.