Stem Cell research
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Adult Stem Cells, not Embryonic Stem Cells, Can Treat Cancer: a true story - National Right to Life News

Adult Stem Cells, not Embryonic Stem Cells, Can Treat Cancer: a true story - National Right to Life News | Stem Cell research | Scoop.it
National Right to Life News Adult Stem Cells, not Embryonic Stem Cells, Can Treat Cancer: a true story National Right to Life News Not long ago a coworker, a friend really, and I were standing in the alley behind our office building sipping coffee...
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Duke doctor: Stem cell therapy might help heart disease patients - WRAL.com

Duke doctor: Stem cell therapy might help heart disease patients - WRAL.com | Stem Cell research | Scoop.it
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Duke doctor: Stem cell therapy might help heart disease patients
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Durham, N.C. — People with heart disease have more treatment options than ever. However, sometimes nothing gets rid of continued chest pain known as angina.
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Stem cell implants can fix broken bones - Times of India

Stem cell implants can fix broken bones - Times of India | Stem Cell research | Scoop.it
Wired.co.uk Stem cell implants can fix broken bones Times of India The material developed by the Universities of Edinburgh and Southampton is a honeycomb scaffold structure that allows blood to flow through it, enabling stem cells from the...
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Tufts professor turns to rap to reach students - Boston Globe

Tufts professor turns to rap to reach students - Boston Globe | Stem Cell research | Scoop.it
Boston Globe Tufts professor turns to rap to reach students Boston Globe MEDFORD — One moment, Jonathan Garlick is doing something you might expect of a scholarly looking researcher, leading Tufts University freshmen through a discussion of the...
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Stem cell therapy to repair damaged knee cartilage

Stem cell therapy to repair damaged knee cartilage | Stem Cell research | Scoop.it
Medical researchers are conducting the first clinical study in the U.S. of an innovative stem cell drug, Cartistem, to repair knee cartilage damaged by aging, trauma or degenerative diseases such as osteoarthritis.
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Stem Cell Investigator Awards

Stem Cell Investigator Awards | Stem Cell research | Scoop.it
The New York Stem Cell Foundation requests applications from early career investigators from throughout the world to cultivate research that will exp... (RT @pknoepfler: Kudos to @nyscf Stem Cell New Investigator Awards !
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Stem Cell Research: Inventing The Future

Click here for more info http://LiveLab.is/InventingTheFuture What does the future have in store for stem cells? How will this new research and technology af... (RT @LiveLabNetwork: Curious about what’s next in Stem Cell Research @UCPritzker?
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New method can generate stable human mesenchymal stem cells for bone engineering

New method can generate stable human mesenchymal stem cells for bone engineering | Stem Cell research | Scoop.it
Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) can develop into bone cells and are useful for tissue engineering and regeneration. However, when grown in the laboratory they quickly lose their ability to continue dividing and they die.
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New technique to deliver stem cell therapy may help damaged eyes regain their sight

New technique to deliver stem cell therapy may help damaged eyes regain their sight | Stem Cell research | Scoop.it
Engineers have developed a new technique for delivering stem cell therapy to the eye which they hope will help the natural repair of eyes damaged by accident or disease.
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Stem cells from umbilical cord could cure leukemia girl - KSWT-TV

Stem cells from umbilical cord could cure leukemia girl - KSWT-TV | Stem Cell research | Scoop.it
Stem cells from umbilical cord could cure leukemia girl
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Los Algodones, Mexico--According to Dr. Jose Luis Diaz barboza he is no longer fighting Emily Bracamontes cancer with chemotherapy.
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European Project Aims To Create 1,500 New Stem Cell Lines ...

European Project Aims To Create 1,500 New Stem Cell Lines ... | Stem Cell research | Scoop.it
Scientists are becoming more adept at turning skin cells into pluripotent stem cells, which can then be converted to other cell types such as neurons or heart cells. And because these are human cells they are superior to ...
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Researchers trap immune cells in oil-water droplets in hopes of reprogramming them to fight cancer

Researchers trap immune cells in oil-water droplets in hopes of reprogramming them to fight cancer | Stem Cell research | Scoop.it

Some biologists would like to train patients’ own immune systems to treat diseases such as cancer and autoimmune disorders. They envision programming immune cells to destroy tumor cells or to stop immune system attacks on healthy tissue. Now a team of German researchers reports a method that traps immune cells in microscopic water droplets and exposes the cells to chemical signals that could teach them the difference between friend and foe (J. Am. Chem. Soc., DOI: 10.1021/ja311588c).

 

In our immune systems, T cells play many key roles in preventing disease. They attack invaders such as viruses, help hold the immune system’s memory of past infections, and even prevent other immune cells from attacking the body’s own tissue. Joachim P. Spatz and Ilia Platzman, researchers atMax Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, in Stuttgart, Germany, study how T cells mature and get trained in a particular task. Many types of T cells interact with antigen-presenting cells, which gather up and display fragments of proteins from viruses, bacteria, and other invaders. Through these cellular interactions, the T cells learn how to identify threats and help the immune system eliminate them.

 

Immunologists believe it will be possible to treat diseases by mimicking this process outside the body. For example, a doctor could isolate a cancer patient’s own T cells, expose the cells to antigens specific to the cancer, and then transplant the cells back to direct the immune system to attack the tumor.

 

Previously developed techniques have exposed T cells to flat, relatively rigid surfaces patterned with antigens. But some researchers think a more optimal approach would involve exposing the T cells to an environment that mimics the three-dimensional curvature and squishiness of real cells.

 

The Max Planck Institute group thought they could create such an environment by enclosing T cells within droplets of water in oil. The inner surface of these droplets contains surfactant molecules that produce a fluid and mechanically soft surface, like that of a cell membrane. The team also developed a way to anchor biomolecules to the surfactants, to mimic the surfaces of antigen-presenting cells.

 

The researchers make the droplets by mixing two streams of liquid in a microfluidic system: an oil solution of the surfactants and a water-based mixture of T cells and culture medium. When the two streams meet, droplets form, with the T-cell mixture trapped inside bubbles of surfactant. The researchers attach gold nanoparticles decorated with antigens to the water-facing end of the surfactants. These particles act like the surfaces of antigen-presenting cells. The droplets can be as small as 10 µm wide, and can hold up to six cells each.

 

In a proof of concept experiment, the scientists coated the gold particles with protein fragments known to interact with T cells. When they looked at the droplets under a microscope, they saw that the T cells adhered to the droplets’ inner surfaces. In droplets made with undecorated gold nanoparticles, the cells floated around randomly within the bubbles.

The cells can survive inside the droplets for five days, after which time Platzman believes they run out of food, since the volume of the droplets is extremely small—just a few picoliters. The researchers next plan to use these droplets to expose T cells to disease-related antigens.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Philippe Trebaul's curator insight, March 5, 2013 12:32 PM
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Cellules immunitaires chercheurs piège huile-eau des gouttelettes dans l'espoir de reprogrammer leur lutte contre le cancer.

"Certains biologistes souhaitez former patients propre système immunitaire pour traiter des maladies telles que le cancer et les troubles auto-immunes.Ils envisagent de programmer des cellules immunitaires à détruire les cellules tumorales ou à arrêter les attaques du système immunitaire sur les tissus sains. Maintenant, une équipe de chercheurs allemands fait état d'une méthode qui piège les cellules immunitaires dans les gouttelettes d'eau microscopiques et expose les cellules à des signaux chimiques qui pourraient leur enseigner la différence entre ami et ennemi (J. Am. Chem Soc, DOI:... 10.1021/ja311588c) .

 

Dans notre système immunitaire, les lymphocytes T jouent de nombreux rôles clés dans la prévention de la maladie. Ils attaquent les envahisseurs tels que les virus, aider à maintenir la mémoire du système immunitaire des infections passées, et même de prévenir d'autres cellules du système immunitaire d'attaquer les propres tissus du corps. Joachim P. Spatz et Ilia Platzman, les chercheurs ATmax Planck Institut des Systèmes Intelligents, à Stuttgart, en Allemagne, étudier comment les cellules T matures et se former dans une tâche particulière. De nombreux types de cellules T interagissent avec les cellules présentatrices d'antigène, qui se réunissent et afficher des fragments de protéines du virus, les bactéries et autres envahisseurs. Grâce à ces interactions cellulaires, les cellules T apprendre à identifier les menaces et aider le système immunitaire à les éliminer.

 

Immunologistes crois qu'il sera possible de traiter les maladies en imitant ce processus en dehors du corps. Par exemple, un médecin peut isoler propres d'un patient cancéreux des cellules T, les cellules exposer à des antigènes spécifiques à la tumeur, puis transplanter les cellules de retour pour diriger le système immunitaire à attaquer la tumeur.

 

Techniques précédemment développés ont exposé des cellules T à des surfaces planes et rigides relativement à motifs avec des antigènes. Mais certains chercheurs pensent une approche plus optimale consisterait à exposer les cellules T à un environnement qui imite la courbure tridimensionnelle et squishiness de véritables cellules.

 

L'Institut Max Planck groupe a pensé qu'ils pouvaient créer un tel environnement en enfermant des cellules T dans les gouttelettes d'eau dans l'huile. La surface interne de ces gouttelettes contient des molécules tensioactives qui produisent un fluide et la surface mécaniquement souple, comme celle d'une membrane cellulaire. L'équipe a également développé une façon d'ancrer biomolécules aux tensioactifs, à imiter les surfaces des cellules présentatrices d'antigène.

 

Les chercheurs font des gouttelettes en mélangeant deux courants de liquide dans un système microfluidique: une solution d'huile et de tensioactifs un mélange à base d'eau des cellules T et un milieu de culture.Lorsque les deux flux se rencontrent, sous forme de gouttelettes, avec le mélange des lymphocytes T piégées à l'intérieur des bulles d'agent tensio-actif. Les chercheurs attachent des nanoparticules d'or décorées avec des antigènes à la fin l'eau face à des tensio-actifs. Ces particules se comportent comme des surfaces de cellules présentatrices d'antigène. Les gouttelettes peuvent être aussi petites que 10 um de large et peut contenir jusqu'à six cellules chacun.

 

Dans une preuve de concept de l'expérience, les scientifiques ont recouvert les particules d'or avec des fragments de protéines connues pour interagir avec les cellules T. Quand ils ont regardé les gouttelettes sous un microscope, ils ont vu que les cellules T adhéré à la surface des gouttelettes internes ». Dans gouttelettes faites avec des nanoparticules d'or non décorés, les cellules flottaient autour de hasard dans les bulles.

Les cellules peuvent survivre à l'intérieur des gouttelettes pendant cinq jours, après quoi Platzman pense qu'ils manquent de nourriture, puisque le volume des gouttelettes est extrêmement petite, juste un peu picolitres. Les chercheurs ont ensuite l'intention d'utiliser ces gouttelettes d'exposer les cellules T aux maladies liées à des antigènes".



Researchers trap immune cells in oil-water droplets in hopes of reprogramming them to fight cancer via @MercorOrg http://sco.lt/...

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First Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Trial - National Review Online (blog)

First Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Trial - National Review Online (blog) | Stem Cell research | Scoop.it
Independent Online
First Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Trial
National Review Online (blog)
At present, there are three small human safety embryonic stem cell studies. All deal with macular degeneration-type conditions.
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Are stem cell companies increasingly moving out of the US and into Mexico?

Are stem cell companies increasingly moving out of the US and into Mexico? | Stem Cell research | Scoop.it
  CellTex Therapeutics is the most recent stem cell company to announce they are moving their patients and treatment out of the US and into [...]
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A 3D Printer That Generates Human Embryonic Stem Cells

A 3D Printer That Generates Human Embryonic Stem Cells | Stem Cell research | Scoop.it
3-D printers can produce gun parts, aircraft wings, food and a lot more, but this new 3-D printed product may be the craziest thing yet: human embryonic stem cells. Using stem cells as the "ink" in a 3-D printer, researchers in ...
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Human Hearts Built From Adult Stem Cells - National Review Online (blog)

Human Hearts Built From Adult Stem Cells - National Review Online (blog) | Stem Cell research | Scoop.it
Human Hearts Built From Adult Stem Cells National Review Online (blog) Opponents of unethical stem cell research have always believed that scientists would be able to develop a robust regenerative medical sector without needing to create and/or...
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Next steps in potential stem cell therapy for diabetes -Diabetes news-

Next steps in potential stem cell therapy for diabetes -Diabetes news- | Stem Cell research | Scoop.it
There are currently two ways of generating endocrine cells (cell types, such as beta cells, that secrete hormones) from human embryonic stem cells, or hESCs: either generating the cells in vitro in culture or transplanting ...
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New Technique Transforms Aged Stem Cells into Younger Cells | Medindia

New Technique Transforms Aged Stem Cells into Younger Cells | Medindia | Stem Cell research | Scoop.it
A new method is being developed by which growing cardiac tissue is teaching old stem cells new tricks.
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Umbilical Cord Blood may be Key to Preventing Type 1 Diabetes | Medindia

Umbilical Cord Blood may be Key to Preventing Type 1 Diabetes | Medindia | Stem Cell research | Scoop.it
In a recent research it was found that umbilical cord blood could help prevent the onset of type 1 diabetes in high risk children.
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Susan Solomon: The promise of research with stem cells | Video on TED.com

TED Talks Calling them "our bodies' own repair kits," Susan Solomon advocates research using lab-grown stem cells.
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Medical Edge: Stem Cell Research - KAALtv.com

Medical Edge: Stem Cell Research - KAALtv.com | Stem Cell research | Scoop.it
KAALtv.comMedical Edge: Stem Cell ResearchKAALtv.comThere they explored ideas about regenerative medicine. As we hear more about stem cells in the media, what are the actual benefits? The heart muscle cells that Dr.
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