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Rescooped by Frank Yates from Biotech Pharma Innovation in Immuno-Oncology & beyond. Cancer - Immunology - Immunotherapy.
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Analyst Questions High Cost of T Cell Therapies as Potential Frontline Treatment for Blood Cancers

Analyst Questions High Cost of T Cell Therapies as Potential Frontline Treatment for Blood Cancers | Stem Cell Biotech | Scoop.it
T Cell therapy is one of the more exciting explorations of personalized immuno-oncology for blood cancers being undertaken today in the pharmaceutical industry. But, there may be some serious concerns around the marketability of the treatments, an analyst with research and data firm GlobalData told BioSpace (DHX).

CAR-T therapies are seen by many as a potent weapon in the fight against cancer. Chimeric antigen receptor T cells (CAR-T) are engineered to recognize and kill cancer. Steven Rosenberg, an oncology researcher at the Center for Cancer Research, wrote in a 2013 article in “Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology” that “CAR T-cell therapy eventually may become a standard therapy for some B-cell malignancies.”

However, in a new report, Cai Xuan, GlobalData’s analyst covering Oncology and Hematology, said T Cell therapies being developed by such companies as Novartis (NVS), Juno Therapeutics (JUNO), Kite Pharma (KITE) and more, are being hailed as potential breakthroughs in oncology treatments for blood cancers, but the per patient cost is so high, that it must “demonstrate curative ability before it can be considered as a frontline treatment.”

Xuan pegs the cost of potential T Cell treatments as ranging between $300,000 and $500,000 per patient, while existing treatment options, which include stem cell transplantation, have a price point of between $100,000 to $200,000. In addition to the high costs of T Cell therapies, Xuan noted there are also “long and difficult manufacturing” hurdles that must be overcome as well. Xuan said the CAR-T therapies are tailor-made for the individual patient, but that means there is a “complicated and expensive” manufacturing process involved.

Via Dominique Blanchard
Frank Yates's insight:

The cost of Innovative Pratcice in Medicine will become a hurdle as these therapies gain efficiency and increase their market share. Once recserved to a fraction of the population (rare genetic deficiencies..) these therapies will soon become a new medication, and stat-funded health will have difficulties coping with the prices which will necessarily be high, because no Economies of Scale will be possible for these new, complex, biotech products. A new economic model will have to be invented, which will probably be very far from the traditional chemical-based pharmaceutical model.

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Rescooped by Frank Yates from Biotech Pharma Innovation in Immuno-Oncology & beyond. Cancer - Immunology - Immunotherapy.
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Vers l’auto-médecine ?

Vers l’auto-médecine ? | Stem Cell Biotech | Scoop.it
Les auto-tests de dépistage du virus du sida sont arrivés en pharmacie cette semaine. Promus par le Ministère, ils sont désormais en vente libre, sans restriction d’âge. Leurs avantages et inconvénients peuvent être mis en balance interminablement. Pour : fiabilité et simplicité, accès parfaitement anonyme, diagnostic plus aisé pour les sujets ayant des comportements à risques. Contre : solitude au moment du résultat, conséquences imprévisibles résultant d’une absence totale d’encadrement thérapeutique. On peut craindre, en effet, pour l’adolescent(e) découvrant sa séropositivité sans assistance médicale. Si ce test est aujourd’hui disponible, malgré tout, c’est qu’un mouvement d’ensemble, bien plus vaste, suscite des formes inédites d’autonomie des patients. Ce test n’est qu’une pièce d’un vaste puzzle, en construction depuis des années.

Via Dominique Blanchard
Frank Yates's insight:

Patient autonomy and personal freedom are closely linked. In the particular context of the French society, this is an fascinating subject, as a state-governed medicine has until now been the model but it is now being severely shook by bleak economical prospects.

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Rescooped by Frank Yates from Biotech Pharma Innovation in Immuno-Oncology & beyond. Cancer - Immunology - Immunotherapy.
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Les ateliers d'information

Les ateliers d'information | Stem Cell Biotech | Scoop.it

Via Dominique Blanchard
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Nature Biotechnology / CAR-T CAR-T cell therapy seeks strategies to harness cytokine storm

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"(...)clinical trials by investigators at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) in New York were put on temporary hold in March due to several infusion-related patient deaths."

 

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Cellectis sells its Swedish subsidiary, Cellectis AB, to the Japanese company Takara Bio Inc. | cellectis

Cellectis sells its Swedish subsidiary, Cellectis AB, to the Japanese company Takara Bio Inc. | cellectis | Stem Cell Biotech | Scoop.it
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Rescooped by Frank Yates from Biotech Pharma Innovation in Immuno-Oncology & beyond. Cancer - Immunology - Immunotherapy.
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UK asks to use CRISPR on human embryos

UK asks to use CRISPR on human embryos | Stem Cell Biotech | Scoop.it
Kathy Niakan, a researcher at The Francis Crick Institute in London, applied to the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA), asking to lift restrictions on human gene editing.

If HFEA grants approval, the Crick’s work will be for research only and “will not have a clinical application,” the scientists said. The embryos will not be implanted to progress into a pregnancy.

The researchers said results will help them understand how a healthy human embryo develops, and “this knowledge may improve embryo development after in vitro fertilisation (IVF) and might provide better clinical treatments for infertility.” The work also has “tremendous potential for stem cell research, which will have benefits and advances in many different fields of medicine,” they added.

Via Dominique Blanchard
Frank Yates's insight:

In France you can go to jail for this kind of research. Surely the right path is somewhere in between...

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Seven Months After FDA Slapdown, 23andMe Returns With New Health Report Submission

After seven months in the Food and Drug Administration's penalty box, the consumer genetic testing firm 23andMe today took the first step toward getting back in the game of providing health reports in its test results. The company said today that it has submitted for FDA approval a health report that [...]

Frank Yates's insight:

"23andMe worked out an agreement with the FDA to continue selling the test, but only providing raw genetic data and ancestry information, not health reports."

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Pfizer And Cellectis Enter Into Global Strategic Cancer Immunotherapy Collaboration | Pfizer: One of the world’s premiere biopharmaceutical companies

Pfizer And Cellectis Enter Into Global Strategic Cancer Immunotherapy Collaboration | Pfizer: One of the world’s premiere biopharmaceutical companies | Stem Cell Biotech | Scoop.it
Frank Yates's insight:

"Cellectis’ CAR-T platform technology provides a proprietary, allogeneic approach (...) to developing CAR-T therapies that is distinct from other autologous approaches."

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Le FSI aide Cellectis à devenir champion des cellules souches

Le FSI aide Cellectis à devenir champion des cellules souches | Stem Cell Biotech | Scoop.it
La société française de biotechnologies a annoncé l'achat du suédois Cellartis, leader européen des cellules souches. La transaction valorise le...
Frank Yates's insight:

"Le Fonds stratégique d'investissement (FSI), détenu par l'Etat et la Caisse des Dépôts, et un investisseur privé, Pierre Bastid, vont apporter chacun 25 millions d'euros à Cellectis. Chacun obtiendra environ 17 % du capital."

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