STEM+ [Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics] +PLUS+
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This Mind-Boggling Map Explains How Everything in Mathematics Is Connected

This Mind-Boggling Map Explains How Everything in Mathematics Is Connected | STEM+ [Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics] +PLUS+ | Scoop.it
We've then got two main sections that represent the two major fields in mathematics today - Pure Mathematics (an appreciation of the language of numbers itself) and Applied Mathematics (how that language can be used to solve real-world problems).

You can mess around with and download a high-res, zoomable version here, and print it on a throw pillow here, because we all need something to look at on the couch when Taboo is getting a little too weird.

To fully appreciate Walliman's Map of Mathematics, you should definitely watch the video below to get the proper walkthrough.
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STEM+ [Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics] +PLUS+
The debates around STEM v STEAM are plentiful - many STEM advocates disconnect STEM content from meaningful and engaging contexts; seemingly forgetting about active and inquiry focussed pedagogies that can only operate well in a rich integrated ecosystem.  We advocate for STEM+ and the "+" is essential.
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Putting Math and Science Back into STEM Projects

Putting Math and Science Back into STEM Projects | STEM+ [Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics] +PLUS+ | Scoop.it

Many teachers have done the spaghetti and marshmallow challenge in the classroom and called it a STEM project. It’s a great activity, but is it really a STEM activity? Sure there’s an engineering aspect to it, but what about the other components? Looking back, these types of activities are what we refer to as surface-level STEM activities.

WHAT IS STEM?


STEM is the idea that science, technology, engineering, and math are taught as an integrated subject rather than four distinct areas. STEM also incorporates real-world problems into the learning. Students are able to practice problem-solving, teamwork, and design thinking.

Looking back at the spaghetti and marshmallow tower, it’s pretty clear that it doesn’t stand up the test of what STEM truly is.  Again, it’s a great activity, but let’s call a duck a duck.


The STEM Ed Coalition has some fantastic guidelines when thinking about STEM in the science classroom.

STEM education must be elevated as a national priority as reflected through education reforms, policies to drive innovation, and federal and state spending priorities.

STEM education is closely linked with our nation’s economic prosperity in the modern global economy; strong STEM skills are a central element of a well-rounded education and essential to effective citizenship.

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Makey Makey resources for Australian teachers

Makey Makey resources for Australian teachers | STEM+ [Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics] +PLUS+ | Scoop.it

Makey Makey: An Invention Kit for Everyone, is an electronic invention tool and toy that allows users to connect everyday objects to computer programs. Using a circuit board, alligator clips, and a USB cable, the toy uses closed loop electrical signals to send the
computer either a keyboard stroke or mouse click signal. This function allows the Makey Makey to work with any computer program or webpage since all computer programs and webpages take keyboard and mouse click inputs.

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TJ REVERB

TJ REVERB | STEM+ [Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics] +PLUS+ | Scoop.it
Mission Statement

TJ REVERB is a satellite built by high school students at Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology, with the primary purpose to compare multiple communication methods for the purpose of education and creating a best practices document for TJ and others. Additionally, TJ REVERB will provide an educational vehicle to teach students the principles of systems engineering and have the students develop educational materials teaching concepts within science, technology, engineering and math while using the TJ REVERB CubeSat as a subject model.
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Making SySTEMic Change - Corwin Connect

Making SySTEMic Change - Corwin Connect | STEM+ [Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics] +PLUS+ | Scoop.it
Contributed by Laura Fleming

In the near future, over one million jobs will open up in science, engineering and mathematics, but only 200,000 graduates will have the skills to fill them. As a part of education reform for the future, President Obama has consistently called for improvements in STEM education as well as sparking and fostering innovation and growth needed to improve our schools and achieve better outcomes. Expanding STEM education means building partnerships with educators, businesses and community partners to support STEM education. It also means expanding STEM education opportunities for all students.

Many efforts are underway for how to best affect systemic change in order to achieve widespread and sustained transformation of STEM education. Amongst current STEM education reform efforts is the grassroots Maker Movement, which effectively merges both the STEM initiatives the President is championing as well as innovation efforts he has supported. The Maker Movement embodies opportunities for experimentation and innovation and is associated most often with STEM-related concepts and technology-based activities.
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New Google Earth Has Exciting Features for Teachers -- Campus Technology

New Google Earth Has Exciting Features for Teachers -- Campus Technology | STEM+ [Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics] +PLUS+ | Scoop.it
Google has recently released a brand new version of Google Earth for both Chrome and Android. This new version has come with a slew of nifty features teachers can use for educational purposes with students in class. Following is a quick overview of the most fascinating features:
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UW study: Exposure to computers, robots boost STEM interest in young girls

UW study: Exposure to computers, robots boost STEM interest in young girls | STEM+ [Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics] +PLUS+ | Scoop.it
Research from the UW's Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences (I-LABS) found when 6-year-old girls participated in a computer-programming activity, they expressed a bigger interest in technology and more positive attitudes about their own skills and abilities than girls who didn't try it.
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ITEEA - ITEEA Shares Article on "Tools and Equipment in Nontraditional Spaces: Safety and Liability Issues"

ITEEA - ITEEA Shares Article on "Tools and Equipment in Nontraditional Spaces: Safety and Liability Issues" | STEM+ [Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics] +PLUS+ | Scoop.it
What are the risks of placing hazardous equipment (e.g., 3D printer, laser cutter, CNC router, etc.) in a non-T&E lab under the supervision of teachers not certified to teach T&E education?
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STEM in 30

STEM in 30 | STEM+ [Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics] +PLUS+ | Scoop.it
Join us for STEM in 30, an interactive classroom program consisting of 30-minute live webcasts that engage middle school students in STEM topics ranging from WWI airplanes to rovers on Mars. Chat with experts, submit your questions to be answered live, take a poll, discover related content, and participate in follow-up activities.
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Stanford Uni's intro to CompSci course adopts JavaScript, bins Java

Stanford Uni's intro to CompSci course adopts JavaScript, bins Java | STEM+ [Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics] +PLUS+ | Scoop.it

Java's days are numbered – but it's a very large number


"The Stanford professor who wrote a popular book on Java — and has taught Java for 15 years — is now abandoning Java in favor of JavaScript for his introductory computer science courses. 


Stanford’s website explains that their new CS 106J course “covers the same material as [older course] CS 106A but does so using JavaScript, the most common language for implementing interactive web pages, instead of Java.” 


This isn’t the end of Java, which has decades worth of tools and codebases built up, and is still used by many large corporations. Rather, this is just a sign of the times. JavaScript is truly open source and owned by no one, whereas Java is essentially owned by Oracle through its 2010 acquisition of Sun Microsystems. And Oracle has a less-than-stellar track record of honoring open source licenses. "


Kim Flintoff's insight:
Java's days are numbered – but it's a very large number 

The Stanford professor who wrote a popular book on Java — and has taught Java for 15 years — is now abandoning Java in favor of JavaScript for his introductory computer science courses.
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Neil deGrasse Tyson Warns Science Denial Could 'Dismantle' Democracy

Neil deGrasse Tyson Warns Science Denial Could 'Dismantle' Democracy | STEM+ [Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics] +PLUS+ | Scoop.it
"We pioneered industries," Tysonsaid. "Science is a fundamental part of the country that we are."

But in the 21st century, a disturbing trend took hold: "People have lost the ability to judge what is true and what is not," he said.

In a voice full of passion, Tyson said, "This is science," as images flash across the screen showing the world's great scientists from Albert Einstein to Jane Goodall, and scientific accomplishments, from ultrasound images of a fetus and robotic surgery to animations of solar flares and pictures of a swirling hurricane.

"It's not something to say 'I choose not to believe E = mc^2,' you don't have that option."
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In the Borderlands, Connecting Writing and STEM Learning | Educator Innovator

In the Borderlands, Connecting Writing and STEM Learning | Educator Innovator | STEM+ [Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics] +PLUS+ | Scoop.it
Girlhood Remixed and Ink Spilling create formative summer camp experiences for youth nearing adolescence, connecting young women with STEM skills and opportunities, and giving the STEM-inclined an opportunity to embrace writing.

Twin sisters Lina and Maya, both 11-years-old, have interests all over the map: soccer, volleyball, reading, and playing video games. And in the winter, they fundraise to buy hats, scarves, and shoes for people who are homeless in their town of Las Cruces, New Mexico.

But when it came to computer class, they weren’t sure they “fit in.”
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Learning.com Partners with Codesters to Develop Interactive Coding Curriculum

Learning.com Partners with Codesters to Develop Interactive Coding Curriculum | STEM+ [Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics] +PLUS+ | Scoop.it

Portland, Ore. – Ed tech company Learning.com announced a new partnership with Codesters, a leading platform for K-12 computer science instruction, to develop EasyCode Pillars, a powerful online interactive curriculum that incorporates coding challenges and game design into the classroom to cultivate students’ coding skills. This engaging digital literacy resource offers students a dynamic, hands-on coding experience, while providing teachers with an effortless, turnkey instructional solution for use in the computer lab or the classroom. 


“In today’s world, technology is part of nearly everything we do. Yet, we find that many of today’s students are lacking in even the most basic tech skills necessary for success in school, college and careers,” said Learning.com CEO Keith Oelrich. “Through our partnership with Codesters, we are extending our commitment to providing students with opportunities to develop powerful computer science skills with the launch of this new project-based, interactive and engaging curriculum.” 


As an extension to Learning.com’s EasyCode computational thinking and coding curriculum for grades K-8, EasyCode Pillars takes a project-based approach and gives students hands-on coding experience via small coding challenges, debugging practice, game design and short quizzes that test comprehension. Students learn how to animate objects, play sounds and use their mouse and keyboard input, building real-world Python coding skills. Self-paced EasyCode Pillars allows teachers to easily identify and work with struggling students, while more advanced students can move on to increasingly complex projects.

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Free Science Animations Online at LearnersTV.com

Free Science Animations Online at LearnersTV.com | STEM+ [Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics] +PLUS+ | Scoop.it
LearnersTV offers free online interactive science animations on subjects like Biology, Physics and Chemistry. These Animations will help you visualize and understand difficult concepts. Following is the current list of online science animations available as on Monday, April 17, 2017. More animations will be uploaded shortly!!!
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Your art degree might save you from automation, an AI expert says

Your art degree might save you from automation, an AI expert says | STEM+ [Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics] +PLUS+ | Scoop.it
Students now deciding whether to pursue arts or sciences face an uncertain future: While automation is just starting to impact the workforce, Lee believes that 50% of jobs held by humans today will be automated in 10 years, extrapolating from an often-cited 2013 Oxford study. Jobs that require “less than five seconds of thinking” will be among the first to disappear, Lee says. He offers receptionists and factory workers as examples, which have already faced some level of automation. Next will be jobs that rely on crunching numbers, where data is available to make decisions, like bankers, traders, and insurance adjusters.
Kim Flintoff's insight:
Students now deciding whether to pursue arts or sciences face an uncertain future: While automation is just starting to impact the workforce, Lee believes that 50% of jobs held by humans today will be automated in 10 years, extrapolating from an often-cited 2013 Oxford study. Jobs that require “less than five seconds of thinking” will be among the first to disappear, Lee says. He offers receptionists and factory workers as examples, which have already faced some level of automation. Next will be jobs that rely on crunching numbers, where data is available to make decisions, like bankers, traders, and insurance adjusters.
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Media Statements - STEM partnership to benefit students

Media Statements - STEM partnership to benefit students | STEM+ [Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics] +PLUS+ | Scoop.it
STEM partnership to benefit students

Tuesday, 9 May 2017
 
​$4 million project to develop and deliver teaching and learning resources
Focus on preparing students for future employment
STEM Education Consortium comprises Scitech, the computing (ECAWA), mathematics (MAWA) and science (STAWA) teachers' associations
With 75 per cent of jobs in the emerging economy requiring critical thinking and problem-solving in science and technology, The STEM Learning Project will equip today's students with skills for the future. 
 
To help meet this challenge, the Department of Education is involved in a three-year, $4 million partnership with the STEM Education Consortium, leading the project which Education and Training Minister Sue Ellery today (May 9) officially launched.
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Justin Millen's curator insight, May 17, 6:45 PM
The STEM Learning Project will equip today's students with the skills for the future.
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Good vibrations no longer needed for speakers as research encourages graphene to talk

Good vibrations no longer needed for speakers as research encourages graphene to talk | STEM+ [Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics] +PLUS+ | Scoop.it
Traditional speakers mechanically vibrate to produce sound, with a moving coil or membrane pushing the air around it back and forth. It is a bulky technology that has hardly changed in more than a century.
This innovative new technique involves no moving parts. A layer of the atomically thin material graphene is rapidly heated and cooled by an alternating electric current, and transfer of this thermal variation to the air causes it to expand and contract, thereby generating sound waves.
Though the conversion of heat into sound is not new, the Exeter team are the first to show that this simple process allows sound frequencies to be mixed together, amplified and equalised - all within the same millimetre-sized device. With graphene being almost completely transparent, the ability to produce complex sounds without physical movement could open up a new golden generation of audio-visual technologies, including mobile phone screens that transmit both pictures and sound.
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The 'mother of WiFi' gets her due in a new documentary

The 'mother of WiFi' gets her due in a new documentary | STEM+ [Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics] +PLUS+ | Scoop.it
Twenty minutes into Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr Story, I realized I know the actress for an embarrassing reason. We're introduced to one of the defining moments of Lamarr's career. She appears nude, hiding in some bushes in a 1933 black-and-white Czech-Austrian movie called Ekstase (or Ecstasy), which I first saw in a German art museum earlier this year. Back then, as executive producer Susan Sarandon put it, "She was the first woman to reenact an orgasm on screen!" I wish I knew Lamarr for a nobler reason, but I was just one of many who associated the actress with her less-savory exploits.

Regardless of whether you remember Lamarr, or what you know her for, her achievements are many -- that much Bombshell makes clear. She was a hardworking actress, a determined producer, a patriotic supporter of American troops, a wife (many times over), an unpredictable mother and an icon of Hollywood glamour. But one title for which Lamarr never received real recognition during her life was that of inventor.
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Robots in the cloud: How robotics-as-a-service can help your business | ZDNet

Robots in the cloud: How robotics-as-a-service can help your business | ZDNet | STEM+ [Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics] +PLUS+ | Scoop.it
Companies are now offering robotics-as-a-service to help customers with management tasks.
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ITEEA - STEM Center

ITEEA - STEM Center | STEM+ [Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics] +PLUS+ | Scoop.it
The STEM Center for Teaching and Learning™ was established in 1998 to strengthen professional development and advance technological literacy. Center initiatives are directed toward four goals: development of standards-based curricula; teacher enhancement; research concerning teaching and learning; and curriculum implementation and diffusion.
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The Trouble with Robots

Robots aren't as evolved as we might think. Kate Darling is a research specialist at the MIT Media Lab.
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Education in ABCs and density

Education in ABCs and density | STEM+ [Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics] +PLUS+ | Scoop.it
Preschool math performance predicts future academic achievement more consistently than reading or attention skills, according to new research from New America and the Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop.

"STEM Starts Early" reports that preschool math knowledge predicts math achievement into high school, and a randomized study of McGraw-Hill’s Building Blocks curriculum, which embeds mathematical learning into preschool activities, led to higher scores in literacy and language, such as recognizing letters, expressing knowledge and understanding spoken words.
Kim Flintoff's insight:
So why aren’t STEM ideas woven more seamlessly into early childhood education classes? The report identifies four barriers:  
1. Teachers and parents require additional knowledge and support to effectively teach early childhood STEM.

2. Early childhood teachers need more robust training in developmentally appropriate STEM instruction.

3. STEM funding appears to be skewed toward older children. 

4. The public holds misconceptions about STEM, such as that it is designed for older children or students who excel in those areas.
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'Huge skills gap': High school students falling behind four-year-olds

'Huge skills gap': High school students falling behind four-year-olds | STEM+ [Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics] +PLUS+ | Scoop.it
With the younger generation learning to code before they learn to read, today's high school students need to quickly catch up.
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Larry Heuser's curator insight, April 24, 8:09 AM

Telling commentary on the need for better preparation for tomorrows job skills.

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Scientists, Stop Thinking Explaining Science Will Fix Things. It Won’t.

Scientists, Stop Thinking Explaining Science Will Fix Things. It Won’t. | STEM+ [Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics] +PLUS+ | Scoop.it
It seems many scientists would take matters into their own hands by learning how to better communicate their subject to the masses. I’ve taught science communication at Columbia University and New York University, and I’ve run an international network of workshops for scientists and writers for nearly a decade. I’ve always had a handful of intrepid graduate students, but now, fueled by the Trump administration’s Etch A Sketch relationship to facts, record numbers of scientists are setting aside the pipette for the pen. Across the country, science communication and advocacy groups report upticks in interest. Many scientists hope that by doing a better job of explaining science, they can move the needle toward scientific consensus on politically charged issues. As recent studies from Michigan State University found, scientists’ top reason for engaging the public is to inform and defend science from misinformation.

It’s an admirable goal, but almost certainly destined to fail. This is because the way most scientists think about science communication—that just explaining the real science better will help—is plain wrong. In fact, it’s so wrong that it may have the opposite effect of what they’re trying to achieve.
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Opinion | The World’s Most Beautiful Mathematical Equation

Opinion | The World’s Most Beautiful Mathematical Equation | STEM+ [Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics] +PLUS+ | Scoop.it

Geeks, take heart: While you can’t see or hear mathematical ideas, they too are capable of arousing a sense of beauty.

No doubt you’d like to know which equation won the beauty contest. It was the so-called Euler’s identity, which is a deceptively spare but profound equation that links five fundamental mathematical constants: a mix of real and imaginary numbers that combine to make zero. And the ugliest? Ramanujan’s infinite series for the reciprocal of pi — a clunky equation, even to this non-mathematician.

 While mathematicians were more likely to find formulas beautiful if they understood them well, the correlation was not perfect, so the researchers were able to show that the observed brain activation was a result of the experience of beauty apart from meaning. This makes sense, in that there were equations that subjects understood completely yet found ugly.

 Now, the medial orbitofrontal cortex is also active when we find something pleasurable or rewarding, which isn’t surprising either, since you’d expect beautiful experiences to be both.

Kim Flintoff's insight:
"Geeks, take heart: While you can’t see or hear mathematical ideas, they too are capable of arousing a sense of beauty. 

No doubt you’d like to know which equation won the beauty contest. It was the so-called Euler’s identity, which is a deceptively spare but profound equation that links five fundamental mathematical constants: a mix of real and imaginary numbers that combine to make zero. And the ugliest? Ramanujan’s infinite series for the reciprocal of pi — a clunky equation, even to this non-mathematician. 

While mathematicians were more likely to find formulas beautiful if they understood them well, the correlation was not perfect, so the researchers were able to show that the observed brain activation was a result of the experience of beauty apart from meaning. This makes sense, in that there were equations that subjects understood completely yet found ugly. 

Now, the medial orbitofrontal cortex is also active when we find something pleasurable or rewarding, which isn’t surprising either, since you’d expect beautiful experiences to be both."
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