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Articles relating to the states of matter in everyday life and science.
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Advertising That Looks Back at You

Advertising That Looks Back at You | States of matter | Scoop.it
What if a video advertisement could gaze into your face, and, by using its own intelligence, correctly guess your age and gender? At 450 gas stations in 12 countries, that's either happening already, or it's about to.
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In 420 gas station in 12 countries, a camera system tunes into peoples facial features to discover their gender and age. Called OptimEyes, the system is the creation of UK digital advertising company Amscreen.  The system isn’t made for facial recognition, just to find out what kind of people are buying what products, and help advertises know their audience.  “No images of customers are retained or stockpiled, and the only data kept are the macro numbers for how many shoppers during a given time period were of what age and sex”, stressed a spokesperson for one of the stores using the system. Many people though, still speak out against the product and claim it’s one of the first steps towards facial recognition.

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Check This Out: Edible Sensors Tell You When Your Food Has Gone Bad

Check This Out: Edible Sensors Tell You When Your Food Has Gone Bad | States of matter | Scoop.it
What's worse than when you pour a bowl-full of milk onto your morning cereal and take a nice big spoonful only to discover that the milk has gone sour? OK, there are other worse things, but it's
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Hu "Tiger" Tao, a post-doctoral student at Tufts University in Massachusetts, has created  an edible sensor that can detect when food quality, with an age old ingredient, silk. The technology that used is similar to the sort used in RFID chips that keep track of pets or livestock, blood pressure, etc. Using what's called dielectric properties -- chemical changes that occur as a fruit ripens or rots, for example -- the sensors emit an electromagnetic signal that can be monitored by a reader to, and you could also gues status notifications on your phone. So with these edible, tasteless chips you can always know when your food is ripe and not have to play a guessing game.

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Honey bees can be trained to detect cancer - Dezeen

Honey bees can be trained to detect cancer - Dezeen | States of matter | Scoop.it
Dezeen
Honey bees can be trained to detect cancer
Dezeen
The tubes connected to the small chamber create condensation, so that exhalation is visible. Detecting chemicals in the axilla.
Katherine Stager's insight:

Honey bees have been trained to detect cancer and varies other diseases. “The bees are placed in a glass chamber into which the patient exhales; the bees fly into a smaller secondary chamber if they detect cancer.” The bees are trained by being exposed to a smell and then being given sugar. They quickly associate the smell with food and there forth when a patient with a certain disease breaths into the chamber, the honeybee’s rush toward the secondary chamber where they are feed. So far bees are able to detect tuberculosis, lung, skin, and pancreatic cancer. They can also be trained to snuff out explosives. This could definitely play major role in stopping disease before it’s a major issue.

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Argentine scientists tap cow burps for natural gas

Argentine scientists tap cow burps for natural gas | States of matter | Scoop.it
Argentina's National Institute of Agricultural Technology claims its innovation could curb the greenhouse gases that are believed to cause global warming.
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Scientist in Argentina claim to have discovered a way to transform cow burps into fuel. ”Methane is the main component of natural gas, used to fuel everything from cars to power plants,” the article says, and methane can be found cow burps. Scientist look into being able to separate the methane from the burps and use it to create fuel. Currently, it’s not very practical, but in the future, when natural gas is much more difficult to come by, that may not be so.

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UC Riverside Engineers Reveal Technology That Turns Human Waste Into Fuel - CBS Los Angeles

UC Riverside Engineers Reveal Technology That Turns Human Waste Into Fuel - CBS Los Angeles | States of matter | Scoop.it
Engineers at UC Riverside unveiled a new technology that turns human waste into fuel.
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New technology is revealed that can turn human waste into fuel. Research engineer Junior Castillo said they have created a two-story pressurized reactor, which reaches temperatures of almost 1,400 degrees, combines waste and other organic ingredients to create useable fuels. To make the machine work you only need two things, treated human waste and wood chips. And as we will never run out of human waste and wood chips, the potential benefits to the environment could be priceless.

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New technology could alter airport security rules on liquids - CNBC.com

New technology could alter airport security rules on liquids - CNBC.com | States of matter | Scoop.it
New technology could alter airport security rules on liquids
CNBC.com
In a few short years, air travelers may no longer have to toss their water bottles or pricey face creams when they pass through airport security.
Katherine Stager's insight:

New technology has been made that can change the liquid limitations at airport. When traveling most airports allow no more the 4 oz. or liquid to pass through TSA, to prevent hazardous materials from coming on board. But Los Alamos National Laboratory created something called MagRay which uses magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and X-rays to quickly analyze whether a bottle's contents are safe or dangerous. Screening Liquids is difficult to do with X-ray, which is built to analyze solids, but once you add MRI to the X-rays and suddenly you have something different. Because of this in an estimate of four years, airport passengers don’t have to be greeted with the unpleasant surprise or having there homemade marmalade, or their expensive face cream being throw into the trash bin. 

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Gas monitors protect firefighters

Gas monitors protect firefighters | States of matter | Scoop.it
Albany Firefighters will soon use monitors to check air quality while fighting fires and warn them about dangerous fumes. A recent study found firefighters suffer high cancer rates because of long term exposure to contaminants from fires.
Katherine Stager's insight:

Georgia Firefighters will begin to use small devices that monitor the air around them while they are on the job. Firefighters are constantly saving others from fires, which in itself is a rather hazardous duty.  Then add the constant breathing of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide, both of which can cause cancer, respiratory problems, and more, and this job just got even more dangerous. To prevent this even if just a bit these gas monitors have been created to test four levels of gases, and inform firefighters when the air is safe to breath, and when they can take off their protective masks. Hopefully these will help firefighters live longer, healthier lives.  

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Plasma-treated, Carbon-nanotube Filters For Water Purification In ...

Plasma-treated, Carbon-nanotube Filters For Water Purification In ... | States of matter | Scoop.it
Plasma-treated carbon nanotubes can function very effectively as an inexpensive means of purifying water in developing countries, according to new research from the Singapore University of Technology and Design.
Katherine Stager's insight:

Scientist are creating plasma treated water purifiers, which are cheap, effective, and portable. Most water filters currently are expensive, or can't always completely purify water. Many people can’t access clean water, and can contract diseases and parasites drinking dirty water, so this could help people get access to the clean water they need, especially in poorer, third world countries.

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