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Bill Would Legalize Marijuana in USA on a Federal Level

Bill Would Legalize Marijuana in USA on a Federal Level | Drug Addiction - Courtney Wyche | Scoop.it

Via Beckley Foundation, Julian Buchanan
Courtney Wyche's insight:

I think it's interesting that there is a bill out there that would legalize marijuana. I don't think there's anything wrong with this if they treat it like they treat alcohol, with a lot of supervision and rules. It would bring down the crime rate, too.

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Rescooped by Courtney Wyche from Action for Addiction
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Drug Addiction: No Victim, No Crime? - Evening Sun (subscription) (blog)

Drug Addiction: No Victim, No Crime? - Evening Sun (subscription) (blog) | Drug Addiction - Courtney Wyche | Scoop.it
Drug Addiction: No Victim, No Crime?
Evening Sun (subscription) (blog)
As someone who has been personally affected by addiction through family, friends and boyfriends, I know it's just not that simple.

Via in-recovery.com
Courtney Wyche's insight:

This is very interesting. Before, I was leaning more towards the 'say no" side of the drug war, but now that I read a personal testimony of a girl affected by people with drug addiction in their life, it's changed my mind.

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Kailyn Taylor's curator insight, December 12, 2013 8:30 AM

I included this article on my page because it it talks about the war on drugs and how it's not working. This article would be for people that would want to be informed on the war on drugs and if it's really working or not. This article relates to drug addiction is a war!

Rescooped by Courtney Wyche from Amazing Science
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CDC study: Painkiller addictions worst drug epidemic in US history

CDC study: Painkiller addictions worst drug epidemic in US history | Drug Addiction - Courtney Wyche | Scoop.it

Fatal overdoses have reached epidemic levels, exceeding those from heroin and cocaine combined, according to the CDC. Prescriptions for painkillers in the United States have nearly tripled in the past two decades and fatal overdoses reached epidemic levels, exceeding those from heroin and cocaine combined, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

 

At the same time, the first-ever global analysis of illicit drug abuse published this month by The Lancet, a British medical journal, found that addictions to heroine and popular painkillers, including Vicodin and OxyContin, kill the most people and cause the greatest health burden, compared to illicit drugs such as marijuana and cocaine.

 

High-income nations, such as the United States, United Kingdom and Australia, had the highest rates of abuse, 20 times greater than in the least impacted countries, according to The Lancet study.

In the United States, enough painkillers were prescribed in 2010 to medicate every American adult around-the-clock for one month.

 

Dr. Andrew Kolodny, president of Physicians for Responsible Opioid Prescribing, told Al Jazeera that the United States is facing a dangerous epidemic of overdoses and addictions related to painkillers. "According to the CDC, this is the worst drug epidemic in U.S. history," he said. "CDC has data demonstrating that around the same time doctors began aggressively prescribing these medications in the late 1990s, there have been parallel increases in rates of addiction."

 

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Kolodny said, is "failing miserably" at curbing the epidemic.

 

"The way to turn this epidemic around is for doctors to prescribe painkillers more cautiously," he said. But that can only happen, Kolodny said, when the FDA changes labeling requirements for painkillers, "making it easier for medical schools and the larger medical community to prescribe these meds more cautiously." He called current FDA-approved labeling "very broad," because the drugs have no suggested maximum dose nor suggested duration of use.

 

Kolodny is part of a group of health officials who signed a citizens' petition (PDF) in 2012 urging the FDA to change labeling requirements on how and when doctors should prescribe painkillers. The group called on the FDA to limit the drugs' approved use to those suffering from "severe" pain, as opposed to the current FDA-approved standard of "moderate to severe pain."

 

FDA spokeswoman Morgan Liscinsky, however, said that prescription painkillers are an important component of modern pain management. The FDA, she said, is working to balance the dual responsibility of addressing misuse, abuse and addiction with continuing to ensure appropriate access to effective pain management for patients who need these medications. 

 

The FDA "is extremely concerned about the inappropriate use" of painkillers, she said, "which has become a major public health challenge for our nation," and the agency "is committed to ongoing efforts to address the problem and supports broader initiatives to address this public health problem, including regulatory, educational and scientific activities."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Courtney Wyche's insight:

This is crazy. I thought it was bewildering when it said that perscriptions and overdoses from painkillers have tripled. I feel like the FDA should change labeling on painkillers as soon as possible to stop this epidemic.

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Kailyn Taylor's curator insight, December 11, 2013 6:16 PM

This article appears on my page becuase painkillers are a popular and serious type of drug. Painkillers in the US have almost tripled in the past 20 years, more than heroin and cocaine. In 2010, enough painkillers were perscribed to medicate every American adult are the clock for one month. A person just getting perscribed to pain killers would benefit from reading this because it serves as a warning to what could happen to someone that got addicted. This article relates to drug addiction because painkillers are highly addictive. 

Jaid Gilbert's curator insight, December 13, 2013 10:14 AM

"In the United States, enough painkillers were prescribed in 2010 to medicate every American adult around-the-clock for one month."

 

Why are doctors prescribing so much pain medication? Not ever case needs pain medication. A lot of people will fake being in pain in order to get their hands on the pian medications. I believe that it is okay to prescribe pain medicaiton, but in moderation. 

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Iowa refines drug control strategy - Quad City Times

Iowa refines drug control strategy - Quad City Times | Drug Addiction - Courtney Wyche | Scoop.it
Iowa refines drug control strategy
Quad City Times
Lukan remains skeptical of most medical marijuana use and said the Food and Drug Administration, not the state legislature, should be marijuana's route into mainstream medicine.
Courtney Wyche's insight:

This article refutes the argument in one of my previous articles about saying no to the drug war. Iowa is definitley fighting the drug war, and though it's a slow process, they're starting to get a decrease in drug abuse by refining drug control and laying down the law.

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Rescooped by Courtney Wyche from Drugs, Society, Human Rights & Justice
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From alive to living: disabilities treated with medical marijuana

From alive to living: disabilities treated with medical marijuana | Drug Addiction - Courtney Wyche | Scoop.it
Chris was a carefree, 18 year-old man when he moved into his first apartment. He didn’t have a lot of money but he had his freedom and independence. But one fateful night took away his beloved freedom and independence in an instant.

Via Beckley Foundation, Julian Buchanan
Courtney Wyche's insight:

I think this adds to the many reasons why people believe that marijuana should be legalized.

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Zayd El-Ali's curator insight, December 12, 2013 9:16 PM

This is an example of a particular case in which an illegal drug should be allowed to be used. This gives further evidence to people against the restriction on marijuana. And that the bad effects conceal the good effects of the drug. And I included this so that people can become aware of the usefullness of the drug and that it should be legalized for medical usage only. 

Dallas Thompson's curator insight, December 15, 2013 11:32 PM

This article should catch the eye of many scientists doing research trying to find treatments and cures for accidents and diseases. When it comes to drugs everyone thinks of all the bad things that are associated with them, yet no one seems to keep in mind all the good that drugs can do as well. Although there are some bad drugs out there, people can't say, "this drug ruined my life." It's not specifically the drug that ruined your life, it's the unsafe overuse of the drug. In this case you can clearly see that some drugs do in fact help you, so what can you say when a drug really does help you, but because you choose to continue to help yourself to it when it is no longer needed, you end up becoming addicted and your life gets flipped? Do you blame the drug or do you blame yourself for not being as responsible? All of us should become more open minded to the good that drugs do and not only focus on all of the bad.

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Oswego police officer looking to crack down on drugs becomes K-9 handler - Syracuse.com

Oswego police officer looking to crack down on drugs becomes K-9 handler - Syracuse.com | Drug Addiction - Courtney Wyche | Scoop.it
Oswego police officer looking to crack down on drugs becomes K-9 handler
Syracuse.com
Oswego, NY -- Oswego police Officer James LaDue's new partner has lots of energy, and already has started to sniff out criminals and illegal drugs in the city.
Courtney Wyche's insight:

Training a K-9 could really  help the war on drugs. They made an interesting comment, that narcotics are a big problem which I didn't expect. 

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Rescooped by Courtney Wyche from Drugs, Society, Human Rights & Justice
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Tests underway on drug that could ‘cure’ meth addiction | The Raw Story

Tests underway on drug that could ‘cure’ meth addiction | The Raw Story | Drug Addiction - Courtney Wyche | Scoop.it

Scientists are testing a relatively common anti-inflammatory drug called Ibudilast for its potential to block the cravings of methamphetamine addicts, and the first round of results shows promise.


Via Julian Buchanan
Courtney Wyche's insight:

Hopefully they come up with an actual treatment quickly. I don't think meth addicts should be treated with drug replacement, if they could just get addicted to that drug as well.

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Kailyn Taylor's curator insight, December 11, 2013 6:44 PM

This article appears on my page because meth is a highly addictive drug. This article talks about a cure coming in the future for meth addiction. Meth addicts could benifit from this, and it could possibly give them some hope. This article relates to drug addiction becuase it talks about meth, which is high additive and popular in the drug family. 

Andrew Lokantsov's curator insight, December 12, 2013 10:05 PM

Well the effects of this should be self-expanatory if it comes to work out.  This could be a God send for those who were misfortunate enough to be addcited to the dangerous drug.

Aspen Evans's curator insight, December 11, 2014 7:34 AM

This article appears on my page because it shows ways the world is trying to solve the problem of drug addiction. People who want to quit could benefit from seeing this because it might give them another way to try and stop.  This relates to our topic of drug addiction because it shows ways to try and put an end to drug addiction. 

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Prescription Drug Abuse and Addiction | SMART Recovery®

Prescription Drug Abuse and Addiction | SMART Recovery® | Drug Addiction - Courtney Wyche | Scoop.it
Information and help to quit prescription drug abuse and addiction using the SMART Recovery 4-Point Program. SMART Recovery's approach is secular and science-based.
Courtney Wyche's insight:

The four step process to battling addiction is interesting.

This article says to battle addiction one needs to keep their motivation to say no, they need to learn to cope with the urges of wanting hte drug, they need to control their thoughts, feelings, and behaviors, and they need to live a balanced life. I wonder if people actually went by these steps if it would help the addiction problem in America.

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Rescooped by Courtney Wyche from Drugs, Society, Human Rights & Justice
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Bill Would Legalize Marijuana in USA on a Federal Level

Bill Would Legalize Marijuana in USA on a Federal Level | Drug Addiction - Courtney Wyche | Scoop.it

Via Beckley Foundation, Julian Buchanan
Courtney Wyche's insight:

I think it's interesting that there is a bill out there that would legalize marijuana. I don't think there's anything wrong with this if they treat it like they treat alcohol, with a lot of supervision and rules. It would bring down the crime rate, too.

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Just Say No to the War on Drugs

Just Say No to the War on Drugs | Drug Addiction - Courtney Wyche | Scoop.it
Ever since President Nixon proclaimed the start of a War on Drugs some 40 years ago, prison populations in this country have grown far faster than the population as a whole. The United States now i...
Courtney Wyche's insight:

This article brings up really good points on why the drug war should end. The main points I got out of this is that the drug war wastes a lot of resources, basically only targers minorities which could get into discrimination problems, instead of getting drug users treatment, we're putting them in jail which is actually more expensive for the people that are paying taxes. Basically, the drug war ultimately hurting our economy. 

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Rescooped by Courtney Wyche from Science News
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Is the Brain to Blame for Drug Addiction?

Is the Brain to Blame for Drug Addiction? | Drug Addiction - Courtney Wyche | Scoop.it

Oxford University researchers believe there is a biological predisposition to drug addiction, following their examinations of the brains of drug addicts and their non-addicted brothers and sisters. The research indicates that both siblings showed the same abnormalities in brain biology, while over the course of their lives, one became a drug addict and the other did not. This suggests that the abnormalities in the brains of addicts are not caused by the drugs they ingest but are, instead, markers of a genetic predisposition toward addiction.


Via Sakis Koukouvis
Courtney Wyche's insight:
I think this explains a lot. Basically, they think drug addiction is biological so addiction is genetic, it doesn't really matter what the drug is an how addictive it can be. They make a point about nurture and nature, and want to gain a better understanding of the biological causes of addiction to tackle the problem.
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