State & Federal Government
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State & Federal Government
State and federal government structures and the relationship between them
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Close the Gap | Oxfam Australia

Close the Gap | Oxfam Australia | State & Federal Government | Scoop.it
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people can expect to live substantially shorter lives than other Australians – up to 20 years less in some cases.
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Sally Ho's comment, April 22, 2013 9:41 PM
Oxfarm have been working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities for many years. Oxfarm is calling on government and all Australians to help join Australia the largest campaign- ‘Close the Gap’ to help improve Indigenous health.

Students are encouraged to view ‘Oxfarm Australia – Close the gap’ website and watch the video https://www.oxfam.org.au/act/events/national-close-the-gap-day/. Working individually or in pairs in the computer room, students further research about ‘Close the Gap’ campaign and answer the following questions:
- What is the issue?
- What views and/or feelings do you have about them?
- What is happening about the selected issue?
- What are the various views about the issue and how might the issue be resolved?
Angus (2000) suggests the following questions as a way of engaging students in studying political issues (Angus, 2000, as cited in Teaching Society and Environment, 2011, p. 24).

It is important students consider the governments’ perspective about this campaign as it links to the unit of study. Hence, students must answer the following questions:
- What do the Close the Gap coalitions expect from the government (federal and state)?
- What have the government done to tackle the health crisis?
Students will then discuss their answers and views through classroom discussion.

Throughout this lesson students are encourage to express their opinions and views when answering all six questions about the campaign. According to McDevitt (2004) a good approach to politics is involving students in discussion of current issues in Australia as well as discussion and negotiation through possible ways of resolving the issue (McDevitt, 2004, as cited in Teaching Society and Environment, 2011, p. 34).

After completing the previous lesson, students should have prior knowledge about the ‘Close the Gap’ campaign.
An extended activity or follow up activity: students create posters to help campaign for ‘Close the Gap’ program. Posters are target at federal and state government to continue to help support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander to achieve health equality within 25 years. Posters must be engaging and presentable; they will be displayed around the school. Posters should inform and educate students, teachers, parents and people in the community about this campaign and encourage others to help support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander. This activity is an excellent way of engaging students in kinds of political activity involved in campaigning (Bently, 2005, as cited in Teaching Society and Environment, 2011, p. 26).

Reference:
Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia

Oxfarm Australia (2013). Close the Gap. Retrieved April 2, 2013 from https://www.oxfam.org.au/explore/indigenous-australia/close-the-gap/
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Government's rail funding plan in doubt - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Government's rail funding plan in doubt - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) | State & Federal Government | Scoop.it
The state government's funding plan for its key transport promises is in doubt after the federal Liberal leader Tony Abbott indicated he'd be unlikely to commit money to rail projects.
Sally Ho's insight:

for the full article view  http://www.theage.com.au/victoria/abbott-comment-throws-doubt-on-rail-road-funding-20130405-2hcen.html

 

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Sally Ho's comment, April 22, 2013 9:40 PM
This resource is focused on federal and state government funding to build its light rail network and airport line by 2018 in Melbourne. This resource/ current issue allow students to identify the federal and state government roles and responsibilities in order for this project to go ahead.
This resource could lead to a classroom debate about ‘funding’ to build light rail network in Melbourne. Students are divided into two groups (negative team and affirmative team), the negative team represents federal government and the affirmative team represents state government. The debate is focused on ‘Should federal government stick to their promises to build its light rail network airport by 2018 in Melbourne’. Throughout the debate, students should consider governments’ roles and responsibilities, funding, community members from Melbourne and all Australians.
The debate is not focused to win the argument, but more of a progress of reflecting on both federal and state government rights, roles and responsibilities through a discussion. This enables students to voice their opinions freely and dynamically (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011). Debating also allows students to deliver their viewpoints through effective speech and spoken techniques such as questioning. This teaching idea may be aligned with other key learning areas such as English-literacy. According to Board of Studies K-6 English Syllabus students in Stage 3 learn “to examine issues from more than one perspective and make recommendations” (p. 70).

This teaching idea and resource allow students to express their opinions and take on different personas. These include members from federal or state government and community members from inner-city Melbourne. This teaching idea is linked to Bono (1985) black hat thinking systems, students are encouraged to make judgement connecting to the resource/ article. Overall, the objective of this teaching idea is for students to understand the difference between both federal and state government roles and responsibilities.

Reference:
De Bono for Schools (1985). Six Thinking Hats: Strength Collaboration Skill. Retrieved April 4, 2013 from http://www.debonoforschools.com/asp/six_hats.asp

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia

Gordan, J. (2013, April 6). Abbot comments throws doubt on rail, road funding. The Age
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Videos: Multimedia; Parliamentary Education Office, Parliament of Australia

Videos: Multimedia; Parliamentary Education Office, Parliament of Australia | State & Federal Government | Scoop.it
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Sally Ho's comment, April 22, 2013 9:37 PM
The video ‘Three Levels of Government’ is an excellent resource to educate students about the levels of government in Australia. From watching the video students will learn about the roles and responsibilities of each government (federal, state and local), similarities and differences between the governments and how all three levels of government work together to govern Australia.

The main focus of this teaching idea is for students to understand federal and state government structures and the relationships between both governments. In order for students to achieve this outcome, students are encouraged to work in groups and further research on federal and state government. Each group is allocated a government, either federal or state. Students create a poster based on their allocated government; posters must be presentable, engaging and include solid information about the government. Posters will be displayed around the corridor, therefore posters must include a variety of information to educate others about the levels of government in Australia (either federal or state). Posters must include a paragraph describing the government, identifies the government’s roles and responsibilities and two issues or current issues associated with the government (eg. federal government, an immigration issue). Each group will present their posters and discuss the issues associated with their government.

As a teacher, it is important to assess every teaching idea as it determines whether or not the aim of the lesson is met. In this case, assess students understanding about the roles, rights and responsibilities of federal and state governments in Australia through a Venn diagram. Each student is given a Venn diagram to complete; students identify and list similarities between both governments and then identify and list the federal and state roles, rights and responsibilities.

This resource and teaching idea enable students to understand the workings of both federal and state government in Australia and linking this to their own lives through current issues.


Reference:
Parliament Education Office (2013). Three Levels of Government. [Recorded by Parliament Education Office].
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Different Forms of Government

Different Forms of Government | State & Federal Government | Scoop.it
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Sally Ho's comment, April 22, 2013 9:41 PM
This is a great resource to encourage students to think about different forms of government in the world. A global perspective might help students explore other types of government compared to our government.
Students research and explore different forms of government in the world. Working individually, students research and explore several different forms of government including anarchy, monarchy, dictatorship, democracy, republic and communist. Using the information gained students, define the meaning of each form of government, list the main basis of that government style, name a country that follows that government style and include an image of the country. Students should use websites (government websites), dictionaries and encyclopaedias to gain information about forms of government in the world. Answers will be discussed through a classroom discussion by using the interactive whiteboard. Teacher will upload the worksheet onto the interactive whiteboard and students will share their answers.

Combining both resource and teaching idea, a further extension activity would be implementing a literacy activity. Students critically reflect on the statement: ‘Australia has considered becoming a republic’. Student’s personal views on this statement could be presented in the form of a ‘personal response writing’. Students must express their opinion, discuss the pro and cons if Australia becomes a republic and the effect it will have on all Australians. Students are encouraged to share their opinions to their classmates through classroom discussion.
This resource and teaching idea provide opportunities for students to learn about several forms of governments through a global perspective. Understand different countries have different authority and regulations according to the government style.

Reference:
Parliament Education Office (2013). Educating schools, teachers and students about parliament. Retrieved April 4, 2013 from http://www.peo.gov.au
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Home – Parliament of Australia

Home – Parliament of Australia | State & Federal Government | Scoop.it
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Sally Ho's comment, April 22, 2013 9:39 PM
This is a great resource for teachers to use when planning an excursion to the Parliament House, as part of the social system and structures unit of study for stage 3 (Years 5/6). This excursion is an exceptional way to get students excited and involved in learning about Australian government. Majority of the school tours, resources, programs and activities provided from Parliament House address the NSW HSIE outcome SSS3.8. By visiting the Parliament House, students build their understanding of how Australia is governed, how laws are made, electoral process and rights, Australian identity and so much more. Most importantly, students will build their understanding about federal and state government.

The Parliament House of Australia is the meeting place of our nation where issues of national importance are debated and dealt with. These include access to the Chambers to watch Question Time and the ability to view historic documents and visit the two houses of Parliament, The House of Representatives and The Senate. Visiting the two houses of Parliament allow students to observe the seating shape of both houses as well as the structure of the room where ministers, government senators, opposition senators are seated. Students will witness where and how the federal and state government meet in Parliament to represent the people of Australia. It important students understand at election time, Australians vote to send a person from their local region and state or territory to represent them in Parliament. All these information will be provided to students during the Parliament house school tours, programs and activities throughout the excursion.

As a teacher, I would definitely use this resource and plan an excursion to Parliament House when teaching this unit. I believe students will have a much stronger understanding about the levels of government in Australia and the roles and responsibilities of the Australian government.

Reference:
Commonwealth of Australia (2013). Parliament of Australia. Retrieved March 26, 2013 from http://www.aph.gov.au
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K-6 Educational Resources :: Human Society and Its Environment (HSIE)

K-6 Educational Resources :: Human Society and Its Environment (HSIE) | State & Federal Government | Scoop.it
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Sally Ho's comment, April 3, 2013 6:36 AM
My resources are focused on:
Stage 3
Outcome: Roles, Rights and Responsibilities
SSS3.8 Explains the structures, roles, responsibilities and decision-making processes of State and Federal governments and explains why Australians value fairness and socially just principles.
Subject matter: State and Federal government structures and the relationships between them