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Brand Value: a Look at Brand-Focused Startup Accelerators

Brand Value: a Look at Brand-Focused Startup Accelerators | Pitch it! | Scoop.it

If you’re a young startup with a gleam in your eye, a working prototype in your back pocket and very little else, then making the right first step will be crucial for success.

For founders with little-to-no previous startup experience,joining an accelerator makes a lot of sense. Even if you’re a seasoned pro with an exit or two under your belt,  a helping hand might still be useful.

Traditionally, accelerators provide a combination of things; primarily a small amount of funding, a space to work and access to mentors, industry bodies and individuals they would otherwise struggle to gain the attention of.

However, while many accelerators are open houses in terms of their focus, there’s been a growing trend of certain businesses to host their own in-house programs, or take part in accelerators that are designed to connect brands with tech startups.

So, how does a brand-focused accelerator – that is, one that promises startups an audience with relevant world-leading brands in their area of focus, or one focusing a specific segment of industry, differ from a more general approach? We spoke to Brandery, Collider, The Bakery London and Orange Fab to find out what they had to offer.

What do startups get out of brand accelerators?

So, what a startup gets out of a brand accelerator is pretty similar to other accelerators – although the specifics of the funding and other benefits often vary.

For example, Collider – a UK-based organization that works with more than 27 individual brands – gives startups a combination of oversight, cash and mentorship over a program lasting 13 weeks.

Each of the Collider startups this year will get up to £150,000 ($243,000) – increased from up to £70,000 – to help them bring a product to market, its co-founder Rose Lewis explained. However, it’s the focus on a specific vertical and the added exposure Collider gives the startups and brands that really makes the key difference, she argues.

 In the first four weeks of our accelerator, they meet with up to 12 brands – all giving their time to the startups, and all  [based] around the product marketing questions: are these businesses building stuff that William Hill, Unilever, Haymarket are going to buy?


Brandery‘s four-month long program is similar to Collider’s – it provides support for seed stage companies in the form of $25,000 in funding, mentoring and access to a host of discounted or free services (such as IT, HR, legal etc.). Brandery also provides one year of free office space for a year, general manager Mike Bott explained. Collider does not offer physical work space.

“Each startup is paired with a creative agency who has committed at least $25,000 in free work. Specifically, two intensive workshops are conducted during the program to get the startups off to a fast start, Brand in a Day and Growth Hack Day. During Brand in a Day, the startups and their creative agency partner develop core brand architecture: new names, logos, taglines, brand manifestos, visual identity and other core pieces of their brand.

Similarly, during Growth Hack Day, the startups, their creative agency partners, and brand managers from Procter & Gamble hammer out key parts of the startups’ marketing plans, including user acquisition strategies, go-to-market strategies, and other ‘growth hacks’ they can use to keep the startup growing and retaining users as quickly as possible.

One of the startups to come through Brandery’s program – and now a part of Disney’s accelerator is ChoreMonster. Chris Bergman, founder and CEO of the company told us that the experience was “incredible” for the company.

We were able to learn from top mentors in the branding space, specifically about what we should do to create a strong brand, how our technology could benefit their agencies, and how brands at Fortune 100 companies operate. I couldn’t imagine our company without the understanding that we gleaned from The Brandery.

Slightly differently, while Brandery and Collider tend to focus on seed stage startups looking to develop their business rapidly for the long-term, The Bakery London exists solely to accelerate ad-tech and marketing startups to a test market within eight weeks.

Its focus is increasing revenues, not scoring investment, its co-founder Alex Dunsdon explained to TNW.

We focus on markets (revenue) not investors (equity)..ie the objective is a trial market not investment in the company. We start with the problem, ie. what the market wants now. Many of the best businesses are able to carve out products that people can test now.

We find the right tech globally against problems. Think of it like flipping the way it normally works – telling the world of tech companies what the market is.

Dunsdon added that it takes very little time to accelerate a technology to trial stage, so the only real reason you’d perhaps want to look elsewhere is if you were looking for investment to get off the ground, rather than looking for a perfect market fit.

All [the companies attracted to our program] have a product and share a desire to scale. The big problem we solve is product / market fit and the ability to use a brands audience to scale.

For other startups, there are reasons to think twice about joining a specific brand’s accelerator program.


For example, if its technology isn’t particularly well aligned with the brand, or because the startup fears that association would jeapordize its independence. It might also make more sense for a startup to enter into an accelerator program based on a specific topic, rather than a specific brand, such as FinTech or health-oriented programs.

The funding aspect of brand accelerators like these are in contrast to the way in which Orange Fab operates: there’s no systematic cash support, although it does provide a convertible note option for interested startups – up to €15,000 in France and $20,000 in the US. Instead, at the end of the program, Orange’s VC division can choose whether or not to invest in the startups.

Douplitzky said that VC affiliates like Iris Capital tend to make minority investments in startups, but that the program launched too recently to provide details on the percentage that receive follow-on funding.

Ultimately, whichever accelerator a startup enters, they generally provide similar benefits on the surface, and an underlying promise of more closely connecting each startup to a brand, whether that’s a single one or mutliple. In some cases they also provide the potential to add legitimacy to startups simply through their association, which is a slightly less tangible benefit.


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10 Tips for Getting into Our Next Accelerator Batch

10 Tips for Getting into Our Next Accelerator Batch | Pitch it! | Scoop.it

We’re currently accepting applications for our next Mountain View Accelerator class. You can apply here.

We’re kicking off our second batch of companies in the shiny new 500 Startups San Francisco accelerator program, otherwise known as 500 Del Norte. We’d like to take this opportunity to tell you a bit about  what we’re looking for and how we select companies.

We started with over thousands of applications for 28 slots. While we’re much more concerned with quality than quantity, if you’re applying to a competitive accelerator you should understand that you will be one of many applications.

Tip 1: Apply Early

We start reviewing applications on a rolling basis as soon as the application window opens. More than half of the applications come in on the last day. If you want us to spend more time on your application, get it in early.

Tip 2: Put effort into your application and give as much detail as possible

 We don’t have the luxury of putting hours into reviewing your application. We need to see something interesting that makes us want to dig in.

We filter these applications with the help of our mentor and founder networks. Our goal is to have at least four people look at every application, ideally with expertise in the space you’re working in. We couldn’t do it without these awesome folks (Thanks 500 mentors!).

We also look extra hard at companies that are referred in by our founders and mentors. A personal recommendation from someone we trust isn’t a guarantee you’ll get an interview, but it’s pretty valuable.

Tip 3: Figure out who you know in the 500 network

Ask them if they would be comfortable recommending your company. If you don’t have this network, consider reaching out to 500 mentors who would understand your business and asking (politely) if they would give you some feedback. Don’t be a creep about it. If they dig your company, you can ask them to give us their thoughts.

Our goal is to narrow the initial applications down to about 100 companies we interview. We do these interviews over 3-4 full days. We split up into teams of two, and each company gets interviewed for 15 minutes. You’ll usually do three interviews.

We do this to avoid groupthink, and to give startups the chance to shine even if one interview doesn’t go well. Interviewers include members of the 500 Investment Team, Distribution Team, other 500 staff, and sometimes 500 mentors.

Tip 4: Come prepared.

You only have 15 minutes. You need to convey who you are, why your business is interesting, and be prepared for us to dig into everything from your unit economics  and customer acquisition strategies to long-term plans and where you met your co-founders.

Tip 4.1: Research the program.

Know what our terms are, know how we work, talk to startups who have gone through the program, and come prepared to tell us what you want from 500. It reflects poorly on you (and is bad business) to consider selling a chunk of your company to someone without understanding deeply what you’re getting in return.

Tip 5: Don’t have a script

Go into the interview with specific questions. We don’t have much time, so remember that your job is to fill in the gaps, not to hammer home what you think is important.

After interviews are complete, we schedule a half-day team meeting to come up with a batch. We start with the companies that we all agree on, either positive or negative, and thi usually gives us the first 10-15 companies. If you have a phenomenal founding team with several exits to your name, a million dollar run rate, 50% month-over-month growth, a beautiful product, and an unsexy-but-giant market – well, you’re almost certainly in. Figuring out the other companies is where the fun (and arguing) begins.

For companies that don’t have all the boxes checked, we look to each other for a champion. We believe groupthink is a big problem in venture capital, so we encourage debate and empower anyone on the team to take a controversial position.

Tip 6: Find a champion

Even if all of us don’t “get” a company, that’s OK. We all have different backgrounds and different interests. Find interviewers who are exciting about what you do, then give them the information they need to be your champion. One ‘hell yes’ usually beats out any other strong negative votes.

After hours of arguing, we end up with a list of 35-40 companies we think are really interesting. We then discuss which companies might be too early.

We believe an accelerator program should help companies refine their strategy, break through concrete bottlenecks in the business, and raise reasonable seed rounds at good valuations once they’re done with the program.

We think a lot about companies getting their money’s (equity’s) worth out of us. If a company is too early to get ready for demo day and achieve their fundraising goals, our accelerator is probably not a good fit.

We try hard to give these companies concrete feedback on what we think they should be working on – then invite them to reapply for our next batch. This isn’t BS. Timing matters with accelerators, and we want you to get the most out of ours.

Tip 7: Tell us what you’ve learned

Markets are Darwinian. The most important skill you can have is the ability to adapt quickly. Tell us what you’ve learned. What were you wrong about? What secrets have your customers told you that give you an unfair advantage? We’re suckers for quick learners.

Tip 8: Tell us how you’ll grow

Startups grow or they die. Where are you customers? How will you reach them? Tell us what you’ve done. Unscalable growth is fine (and reflects hustle), but ultimately we’ll need to see a path scalability. If you’re small you know we can help you grow, that’s really exciting.

Tip 9: Make sure we understand your traction

Traction comes in many forms, with the most obvious being revenue. However, revenue isn’t the only form. This may sound obvious, but we’re looking for people who have executed – not people who will execute some time in the future. Make sure we understand what you’ve done. This is way more important than what you think you can do.

I hope this is helpful. We’re grateful for all the amazing companies we received applications from, and look forward to having some of them in our first San Francisco accelerator. Hopefully this will help you if you choose to apply to our Spring batch in Mountain View. Applications open NOW, so apply here.

Tip 10: Do what’s right for your business.

VCs resonate with simple stories and metrics, so its natural for companies to try to play to the test. But whether you join 500 or not, success comes from being an expert in your business and doing the right thing for it and for your customers. Don’t adapt your business to our needs, but please speak slowly when explaining it. We are VCs after all.



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Find out what it takes to get accepted in an accelerator. Go prepared.

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Why startups need to focus on sales, not marketing by @foundersatwork - The Accelerators - WSJ

Why startups need to focus on sales, not marketing by @foundersatwork - The Accelerators - WSJ | Pitch it! | Scoop.it
JESSICA LIVINGSTON: The most important thing an early-stage startup should know about marketing is rather counterintuitive: that you probably shouldn't be doing anything you'd use the term "marketing" to describe. Sales and marketing are two ends of a continuum. At the sales end your outreach is narrow and deep. At the marketing end it is broad and shallow. And for an early stage startup, narrow and deep is what you want -- not just in the way you appeal to users, but in the type of product you build...

To read the full article, click on the title or image.


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Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, June 4, 9:45 AM

Great article in the Wall Street Journal. What a Startup needs is nothing but proving that it can be successful, and what better way to do that than making that sales model work.

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Good news! 1337 Ventures has a pre-accelerator programme for startups

Good news! 1337 Ventures has a pre-accelerator programme for startups | Pitch it! | Scoop.it
Prominent startup accelerators have strict entry criteria; Alpha Startups pre-accelerator programme aims to fill a gap in the ecosystem.Prominent startup accelerators have strict entry criteria; Alpha Startups pre-accelerator programme aims to fill a gap in the ecosystem.

Accelerators such as JFDI or HaxAsia in Singapore, SparkLabs in Korea and Movida in Japan have had much success in growing startups into fruits that are viable for harvest by early-stage investors. However, the selection pool for each accelerator is large, and not all startups are able to benefit from the intensive training. In fact, JFDI has an acceptance rate of less than 3.6 per cent, as reported by e27 in a previous article.

Now there is good news for pre-seed startups! Malaysia-based 1337 Ventures, the company behind 1337 Accelerator, has announced the launch of its Alpha Startups pre-­accelerator programme together with MDeC.

To read the full article, click on the title or image.



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Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Pre-accelerator programs are an excellent idea. With so few startups  being chosen for funding it is a great initiative to create more quality and offer some first hand experience to entrepreneurs.

Good market for consultants and mentors.

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Behind Closed Doors: What To Expect Inside A Startup Accelerator

Behind Closed Doors: What To Expect Inside A Startup Accelerator | Pitch it! | Scoop.it

Startups fail everyday. And depending on who you listen to, the crash and burn rate is anywhere from 50% to 90% within one to five years.

 

Because smart entrepreneurs know this, they seek help. Mentors, advisors, peer group entrepreneurs, business courses, masterminds and accelerators are a few options. In fact, according to TechCrunch ...

To read the full article, click on the title or image.



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Via Justin Jones
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Wow, what a great article. Answer those questions, and find out what to expect. Are you entrepreneurial material?

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How to Tell if an Accelerator Is Right for Your Startup - Tuts+ Business Article

How to Tell if an Accelerator Is Right for Your Startup - Tuts+ Business Article | Pitch it! | Scoop.it

In this guide, discover the evaluation process, and key considerations, to determine whether an accelerator is a good fit for your startup. If it is, insdide are some great tips on how to increase your chances of getting accepted.

With the success of Mark Zuckerburg and many other entrepreneurs, forming a startup is no longer limited to college students looking to change the world. The technology is available today, if you have the right idea and are determined, you can build the next big thing.

Unfortunately, the journey from idea to marketable product is challenging. For a rookie entrepreneur building your network and knowing how to determine if someone is taking advantage of you are two of the toughest lessons for anyone to learn.

In light of the increased interest in entrepreneurship, many investors, businessesand other relevant partieshave begun forming accelerators as a way to help aspiring entrepreneurs rapidly execute their ideas in sheltered environments. Although the concept is novel and in many cases entrepreneurs greatly benefit, accelerators aren't for everyone.

To read the full article, click on the image or title.


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Marc Kneepkens's insight:

It's a big decision to go for the accelerator option. This article gives good insight in the pros and cons. If you're a startup looking for leverage, read it.

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Five rules I learned from 7 years of coaching Launch Festival & TechCrunch50

Five rules I learned from 7 years of coaching Launch Festival & TechCrunch50 | Pitch it! | Scoop.it

I’ve been coaching companies like Yammer, Dropbox, SpaceMonkey, Brilliant.org and Mint for the past seven years for the LAUNCH Festival and previously TechCrunch50 (RIP!).

Over 350 startups have been on the stage, including the 40 who will join us on Feb 24-26th at this year’s LAUNCH Festival. Our event has grown from 400 folks packed into the Palace hotel to 9,000+ at the Design Center Concourse.

9,000 people, wow. Might even hit 10,000!

In this time I’ve defined five things about what makes for a great presentation at a conference:

To read the full article, click on the image or title.



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Marc Kneepkens's insight:

These tips are real practical examples. Take a good look.

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12 of the Hardest Questions Venture Capitalists Will Ask You - AlleyWatch

12 of the Hardest Questions Venture Capitalists Will Ask You - AlleyWatch | Pitch it! | Scoop.it

Fundraising?  Make sure you know how to answer some of the toughest questions VCs will throw at you..
 




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How Smart Angels Will Leverage Crowdfunding - Forbes

How Smart Angels Will Leverage Crowdfunding - Forbes | Pitch it! | Scoop.it
Equity crowdfunding has a large and growing base of global supporters and advocates.
Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Great article with great insights and analysis of where crowdfunding is headed.


Looking for funding? When using equity crowdfunding, you're still going to have to produce a business plan, especially dealing with Angel Investors, every single one of them will want to know what 'the plan' is.


Consider working with a Growthink Business Plan Template, it creates results. This is what Andy Kessler, Founder of Turning Earth (http://turningearthllc.com/), says about it:


"I was able to pick up a template that I could actually figure out how to use, had all the key components in it, and basically just drop in my idea... We, in fact, were able to raise money."


This is where to get full information and order it:

https://growthink.infusionsoft.com/go/businessplan/gt4045/


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5 Hot Opportunities for Start-ups

5 Hot Opportunities for Start-ups | Pitch it! | Scoop.it
Fresh numbers from Intuit shine a light on where consumers are spending the most--and where you might want to look for new business ideas.
Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Very interesting article, every Start Up should be aware of these trends and take advantage of them.


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Incubated: Y Combinator's Approach To Finding And Helping Startups Become Big Winners

Incubated: Y Combinator's Approach To Finding And Helping Startups Become Big Winners | Pitch it! | Scoop.it

Y Combinator is the most famous of all startup accelerators out there, thanks to success of companies like Airbnb, Dropbox, and Stripe, all of which have gone through its program. YC co-founder Paul Graham once referred to the process of finding and nurturing those big hits as “Black Swan Farming.”

But how does YC do it? What sets it apart from some of the other accelerators out there, and why does it seem like its alumni companies are disproportionately successful? With the latest episode of Incubated, we set out to find out.

At first glance, Y Combinator doesn’t look that different from most accelerators in part because it defined the category. Founded in 2005, its success has inspired multiple other programs to copy its 12-week format of weekly meetings, partner office hours, and access to alumni and mentors from the tech world.

But one of the things that sets it apart from other accelerators is just the depth and breadth of knowledge that exists within its network. In part, that stems from running for so long — there are about 1,500 YC alums available to learn from. And many of those alumni end up becoming the first partners or customers for startups in a current class.

While startups are expected to have their own space, Y Combinator companies meet weekly on Tuesdays to catch up, discuss their progress, and learn from famous entrepreneurs who are invited to talk about their own challenges in scaling up their businesses. It also hosts a series of other events, like Y Combinator Startup School, that are open to entrepreneurs who wish to attend.

One other thing that sets it apart is the selection process: YC takes online applications to help screen applicants, but bases its decision mostly on one 10-minute interview with the accelerator’s partners. It looks for founders who have deep domain expertise, and companies that can be big outliers in different technology.

Y Combinator just opened applications for its winter class this week.


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Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Y Combinator has pioneered this approach and keeps on creating success stories.

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The Rise of Innovation Districts: A New Geography of Innovation in America

The Rise of Innovation Districts: A New Geography of Innovation in America | Pitch it! | Scoop.it
Innovation districts are geographic areas where leading-edge companies, research institutions, start-ups, and business incubators are located in dense proximity. Bruce Katz and Julie Wagner explain how these districts facilitate new connections and ideas, accelerate the commercialization of those ideas, and support metropolitan economies by growing jobs in ways that leverage their distinct economic position.

To read the full article, click on the title or image.



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Via Tammie Nemecek
Marc Kneepkens's insight:

This is excellent! Information about the innovation hubs, how it works and where they are. Great article.

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Meet The 11 New Startups Launching At AngelPad’s Spring Demo Day | TechCrunch

Meet The 11 New Startups Launching At AngelPad’s Spring Demo Day  | TechCrunch | Pitch it! | Scoop.it

AngelPad, the San Francisco-based startup accelerator founded by early Googler and tech investor Thomas Korte, is holding demo day for its Spring 2014 class in San Francisco today.

Since its inception back in 2010, AngelPad has established itself as a top player in the ever-expanding field of tech incubators. Now with operations in New York City (AngelPad’s brand new NYC office is pictured here) and its native San Francisco, the organization steadily graduates about a dozen companies in each batch, with solid alumni success stories including MoPub, which was acquired by Twitter last fall for some $350 million, and Crittercism, which has raised a total of $48 million. AngelPad itself has kept its operations lean and mean: The firm was self-funded up until this past fall, when it raised a tidy $7 million round from a small group of individual investors.

To read the full article, click on the image or title.



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Via Ivan Berlocher
Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Always amazed at the new ideas new start-ups come up with.

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When to work with an incubator or accelerator


If you live in start-up world, as we do there are an astounding number of incubators and accelerator schemes out there. Frankly I could spend most of the article listing them and telling you what they do and how they work. But I won’t – not for a public article, but if you stay after class I will provide some pointers….

However there is a real question to be answered, as an entrepreneur what are the benefits of becoming part of an accelerator/incubator. More to the point what is the difference between them?

To read the full article, click on the title or image.



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Via marcduke
Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Figuring out what fits best for your startup is part of the process of being successful. Do you want to go the fast way and join an accelerator experience, or do you need a little more time and get things straight? An incubator might be what you need. Or do you need none of the above?

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5 Intriguing New Startups In Silicon Valley

5 Intriguing New Startups In Silicon Valley | Pitch it! | Scoop.it

Y Combinator Demo Day took place today at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, Calif. The room was packed with hundreds of investors, entrepreneurs and members of the press trying to find the next billion-dollar startup.

Startup darlings Airbnb and Dropbox are Y Combinator alumni, for example.

Zynga founder Mark Pincus, SV Angel's Ron Conway, CrunchFund's Michael Arrington, 500 Startups' Dave McClure, early Facebook employee Andrew McCollum, and The Winklevoss twins all attended.

67 startups gave 2.5-minute presentations. Here is the first batch of rapid-fire pitches that stood out:

BatteryOS:  "You’ve never actually charged a battery to 100%," the founder explained to the audience. His logic: When a battery charges to near-completion, it begins to degrade. A black gunk begins to form in the battery, which eventually destroys it. BatteryOS says it's found a way to charge batteries all the way up without that residue forming. It claims that if Chevy Volt used its product, the car's battery would last eight years longer.  

"We can change every lithium ion battery on this earth and improve it," the founder said. His company has already signed a deal to ship 20,000 of its batteries.

To read the full article, click on the image or title.



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Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Wow, great article, great solutions.

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Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, March 26, 8:48 AM

Startups come up with amazing solutions. Read the whole article to see all five.

It proves again that human creativity is not dead, and solutions can be found for many problems, even if you didn't know about them.

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The Worlds Top 15 Startup Accelerators

The Worlds Top 15 Startup Accelerators | Pitch it! | Scoop.it

A new survey by two professors used CrunchBase data as well as proprietary research to rank the most effective startup accelerators in America.

MIT professor Yael V. Hochberg revealed the most effective startup accelerators in the country Tuesday at SXSW in Austin. DreamIt Health showed up in slot No. 15 and was the only health-focused accelerator on the list.

Hochberg is a professor of finance at the Sloan School of Management at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She and professor Susan Cohen of the University of Richmond and the Batten Institute at the University of Virginia’s Darden School of Business, used original research and data from CrunchBase to rank the 15 accelerators.

To read the full article, click on the image or title.



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Via Justin Jones
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Update on accelerators, or 'start up school', and how they are classified to Gold, Silver and Bronze.

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How to nail your seed round

Primer on raising seed capital for first time and experienced startup founders and employees.

Click on the title to see the Slideshare deck.


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Via Guillaume Decugis
Marc Kneepkens's insight:

This is a great deck including all the steps of raising seed funding for a startup. It's very detailed, and presented by a venture capitalist. It's the most complete step-by-step guide that you'll find. Of course, guidelines like this are not going to create it for you, but at least, you get some idea of the process and what it involves.



Read more about funding at www.Business-Funding-Insider.com

  • Tools and articles to help get funded
  • Free Listing of your Investment Proposals & Crowdfunding Campaigns
  • Learn what investors are looking for
  • Deal Flow
  • Free Business Plan Template
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Guillaume Decugis's curator insight, February 3, 5:02 PM

Lots of very useful insights in that must-see very detailed slideshare by Steve Schlafman from RRE Ventures.


I wish it described a little more the conditions that a startup need to reach to become interesting for VCs. To build on slides 58-60, I would add:


1. Team: there's little hope in seeing seed VC's with the hope they'll help you complete it.


2. Growth model: traction is cool but mean different things to different people. I'd rather talk about a growth model that explains how the company will grow fast and that is backed by min 8-12 weeks of solid data. 


3. Market ambition: while business plans are mostly useless at seed stage, it's important in my opinion to show there are adressable markets within reach if #2 works well to justify raising from VC's and providing them with a return.

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9 key things to mention when pitching your software startup

9 key things to mention when pitching your software startup | Pitch it! | Scoop.it
When it comes to pitching investors on something like software, the presentation is often more pivotal than the product itself. It's not something that can sit atop a conference table; ...
Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Excellent Points. Even if you're not pitching a software startup, take a look, very intelligent answers from succesful startup entrepreneurs.


Study the way investors think and the questions they ask. What is it that they want to know?


This article complements this other one:

http://www.business-funding-insider.com/business-plan.html



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JOBS Act green light unlikely until fall

JOBS Act green light unlikely until fall | Pitch it! | Scoop.it
Signed into law in April of 2012, the JOBS Act has created much buzz within the start-up industry. The act lays out provisions meant to help businesses raise money directly through ordinary investo...


On the SEC's timing, and the aspect of FRAUD in Crowdfunding!

Marc Kneepkens's insight:

Excellent information!


New to Crowdfunding:? Here is an article with some of the basics: http://www.business-funding-insider.com/crowdfunding.html

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