STAGE ONE social systems and structures
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STAGE ONE social systems and structures
Resources used by families and where they come from
Curated by Donna Ng
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What I Eat: Around the World in 80 Diets

What I Eat: Around the World in 80 Diets | STAGE ONE social systems and structures | Scoop.it
From Bangladesh to Brazil, or what photojournalism can reveal about food and cultural context.

Via Catherine Smyth
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How does your garden grow? - Sydney Living Museums - Historic Houses Trust of NSW

Sydney Living Museums, the public identity of the Historic Houses Trust of NSW, brings 12 major heritage sites alive through exhibitions, publications, events, and education.
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Community Helpers - GRADE 1

A review of community helper titles and descriptions for 1st graders
Donna Ng's insight:

This video links nicely to the HSIE outcome- SSS1.8 Identifies roles and responsibilities within schools and the local community, and determines ways in which they should interact with others.

It identifies various community workers students may interact with. It describes basic facts about each worker and defines their role and responsibility in the community. These workers include; doctors, teachers, librarians, crossing guards, garbage collectors, dentists, fire fighters, police officers, veterinarians, construction and postal workers.  This resource links John Dewey's theory of progressive education, were students develop an understanding and appreciation of workers in the community assisting them in satisfying their needs and wants.

Teaching idea:

Introduce students to the terms ‘roles’ and ‘responsibilities’. Ask the students to identify people in the community who are responsible for meeting their needs. Describe the role of the worker and what their job entails, include cut out pictures from magazines of the specific worker, add labels and a short description.

Assessment:

In groups, have the students research their favourite community or school worker who provides services that meet their needs. Have them conduct an interview asking them; what their role in the community is, what their job entails, why they do it, what equipment they need and how can the student or people in the community make their role easier. Each group writes a script and performs a role-play of likely situations the worker may encounter in the course of a days work. 

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Year 10, NSW | Online Education Home Schooling Skwirk Australia

Year 10, NSW | Online Education Home Schooling Skwirk Australia | STAGE ONE social systems and structures | Scoop.it
Year 10, NSW
Donna Ng's insight:

This site offers a great range of resources linked to Stage 1 outcomes in the HSIE syllabus. Topics addressed include celebrations, wet and dry environments, workers in the community, families past and present, the way we are, the need for shelter, transport and identifying us. There are games, cartoons, a read along, videos, songs, worksheets and curriculum karaoke.

The transport link provides resources connected to SSS1.7 outcome in the syllabus- Explain how people and technologies in systems link to provide goods and services to satisfy needs and wants. Students will recognise the interdependence of people and social systems.

 A teaching idea may be How transport affects our lives? With this focus question in mind, ask the students to:

1.Define what transport is and list types of transport.

2.Reasons for transport. Ask students what types of transport they use in their everyday lives and explain where they have used them and why. Have students map their daily transport route to school, measure the distance and time in reaching their destination.

3.Transport systems. Categorise types of transport and discuss what the differences and similarities are. Investigate what types of goods and resources are transported on different types of systems.

4.Transport problems. Discuss problems such as air pollution, noise pollution, habitat destruction and road accidents. Have students identify how these problems affect people in the environment and think of possible solutions.

5.Responsible transport citizen. Arrange for talks given by road safety education officer about road rules, bike safety and pedestrian safety.

Assessment idea: Ask the students to write a short report on how their lives and people’s lives in the community could change if there was no transport. Discuss the positive and negative effects of transport in their lives. The students could design and make a model of a type of transport they use. 

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Food Timeline: food history research service

Food Timeline: food history research service | STAGE ONE social systems and structures | Scoop.it
Food Timeline: food history reference & research service
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Aboriginal bush foods - Royal Botanic Gardens & Domain Trust - Sydney, Australia

Aboriginal bush foods - Royal Botanic Gardens & Domain Trust - Sydney, Australia | STAGE ONE social systems and structures | Scoop.it
Donna Ng's insight:

This website links directly to resources used by families and where they come from. There is information on Aboriginal bush foods describing their use. The site centres on three different Aboriginal groups, the Cadigal people, the Darug people and the Dharawal people. There are pictures of commonly used plants and information describing its purpose. For example, the Cadigal people collected nectar from the ‘Gil-gad-ya’ also known as the Grass Tree. The nectar was regarded as a good source of energy, the stems were used to make spear shafts and the resin was used as glue. The Darug people made sweet drinks from mixing wattle or banksia flowers in water. For food they gathered grubs and honey from trees as well as yams and tubers which were dug from the ground. The Dharawal people had in depth knowledge of the land and of edible plants, they where able to extract poison from plants and make them edible.

This teaching idea incorporates place based learning. Organise an excursion to a national park guided by an Indigenous expert in Aboriginal bush food. Have students find and taste native berries, nectar, fruit, tubers and seeds etc. Sketch the bush food and write a short description of the plant and where they found it. An assessment task might entail a report on the dissimilarities between native food gathered from the bush and food bought from the store, include sketches of wild plants and pictures of store bought food. 

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Rice | Global Education

Rice | Global Education | STAGE ONE social systems and structures | Scoop.it
Donna Ng's insight:

 

This resource explains how people and technologies in systems are link to provide goods to satisfy needs and wants. It centers specifically on rice production in South East Asia and identifies cultural diversity, globalisation, issues of sustainability, and the interconnections between technologies, workers, users and the environment.

There are 140,000 varieties of rice differing in colour and texture, all cultivated in a range of environments. This resource focuses mainly on these South East Asian countries- Burma, Cambodia, Thailand and Vietnam. Rice production processes include; pest management, weeding, planting, preparation and harvesting. The paddy fields are prepared by a buffalo drawn plough or a small automated machine, farmers then individually hand sow rice seedlings into the paddies. Small animals like fish, frogs and turtles are farmed as another source of income or protein. When the rice is ready for harvesting, the stalks are cut, beaten and the rice is dried in the sun.

Students learning about the production of rice from a global perspective will deepen their knowledge about their own society and the wider world they live in. This in turn may change their pre-existing views and attitudes they have of the world.   Teaching idea: Students list types of food they eat, discuss how they obtain their food and how they prepare it. Compare how this may differ to children from other countries, particularly children from a South East Asian country. Great teaching idea: Organise for Costa Georgiadis from Gardening Australia to talk to students about gardening and growing vegetables, have it filmed and televised on the ABC. Construct a veggie patch in the school, describe the process of plant growth, starting from seed to seedling, plant, flower and then to fruit.

Assessment: Construct a storyboard displaying the processes of how fruit and vegetables end up in the kitchen. This should include the sequence from planting, to harvesting, to trade and lastly consumption. Write a short description of each stage and incorporate the use of transport for transferring goods from farms to processing factories to the supermarket shelves. 

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Making Cents, teacher resources, finance

Teaching materials, financial literacy - Teach finance for kids, teacher resources in financial education, finances, financial lessons for kids.
Donna Ng's insight:

MakingCents provides material relating to resource systems and financial literacy. It identifies the different forms of monetary exchange, investigates ways of acquiring and receiving money, and discusses financial responsibility.

This is a great resource, it is packed full of teaching ideas and games, and the activities suggested are fun and engaging. It is a very practical and hands on teaching resource. Students will develop skills and knowledge of wise money sense and resource management. They will take responsibility of their own financial decisions.

Teaching Idea: Students visit a local bank guided by a financial representative. They will be introduced to banking terminology, e.g. cheque books, bank forms, ATM machines, transaction cards and electronic banking. Students will learn how to open a bank account, reasons why we need them, and different ways of accessing them.

Assessment task

Ask students to compile a simple weekly budget of their expenses. It will include and consider living costs such as food and transport, after school curricular activities, extra spending money (for toys, games, or money for the tuck shop) and savings. Students synthesise their findings and tabulate them in a pie chart. 

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Community Club Home

Community Club Home | STAGE ONE social systems and structures | Scoop.it
Introduce early readers to the job of a pizza maker! Meet Kwaku Twumasi, who describes his job using simple sentences read aloud.
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What the World Eats

What the World Eats | STAGE ONE social systems and structures | Scoop.it
What's on family dinner tables around the globe? Photographs by Peter Menzel from the book "Hungry Planet"

Via Seth Dixon, Catherine Smyth
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Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 5:47 PM
These photos are very interesting, in the way it’s interesting to explore someone else’s house the first time you visit. Looking to see the differences in what people around the world eat, but also how much people around the world eat is fascinating. The fact that the family in Chad eat about one quarter of what most families around the world eat is really telling. What a family eats in week reveals a lot about both their culture, their economy, and their geographic location. It’s no surprise that the people in Japan eat a lot of fish, because they’re an island country; and it wasn’t surprising to see so much bread on the table of the Italian family, because bread is such a large part of the Italian culture. What I did find absolutely fascinating is that most of the families had a bottle of Coca-Cola on their table, which just goes to show you how interconnected our global community is.
Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 5:47 PM
These photos are very interesting, in the way it’s interesting to explore someone else’s house the first time you visit. Looking to see the differences in what people around the world eat, but also how much people around the world eat is fascinating. The fact that the family in Chad eat about one quarter of what most families around the world eat is really telling. What a family eats in week reveals a lot about both their culture, their economy, and their geographic location. It’s no surprise that the people in Japan eat a lot of fish, because they’re an island country; and it wasn’t surprising to see so much bread on the table of the Italian family, because bread is such a large part of the Italian culture. What I did find absolutely fascinating is that most of the families had a bottle of Coca-Cola on their table, which just goes to show you how interconnected our global community is.
BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 4:02 PM

This gallery of 16 families from around world together with their week food is quite a treat that shows agricultural, development and cultural patterns.  Pictured above is the Ayme family from Ecuador, just one of the many family's highlighted in the book Hungry Planet.  The Ayme family that typically spends $31.55 on food and commonly eat potato soup with cabbage.  

 

Tags: food, agriculture, worldwide, consumption, unit 5 agriculture, book reviews, culture, development, unit 3 culture.