Cell Theory: an example of how science and technology has produced new evidence that has changed the way that we understand our world
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Cell Theory: an example of how science and technology has produced new evidence that has changed the way that we understand our world
Stage 4 Living World SC4-15LW: explain how new biological evidence changes people’s understanding of the world
Curated by Alison Strong
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The Cell Theory Song

The Cell Theory Song Mr. Tamez Lyrics: CHORUS All living things are composed of cells Cells are the basic units of structure and function in living things Ne...
Alison Strong's insight:

This is a Youtube video with text lyrics of the "Cell Theory Song". It is a rap song, written and performed by Jeramey Tamez. This video has been specifically designed for high school biology classes on cell theory and its history.
The chorus is a repetition of the three parts of cell theory, presented in a manner that could only be described as "catchy".

Most of the verses are rapped and follow, chronologically, the contributions of various figures to the development of cell theory.

The song is fun, novel and catchy while being considerably light-hearted, which makes it easy to listen to, while rhyme and rhythm make key words, phrases and concepts more memorable.

The use of written lyrics accompanying the song makes it more appropriate for those with hearing impairment as well as those who may learn visually.

 

The language used throughout the video is casual and occasionally uses slang terms popular with younger people. This could potentially be an issue for students not from an English speaking background.

Beyond that, scientific concepts are presented in conversational language, making them more accessible to most students.

 

This video could be presented as either and introduction to cell theory, but would perhaps function more effectively as a revision aid at the end of this topic for a Stage 4 class. This is because students may gain more from it if they already recognise the concepts and names of notable figures.

This video could also be used as a starting point to encourage students to come up with their own creative ways in which to revise and recall content. Such an activity could potentially act as an assessment task, in a creative-arts oriented class.

One weakness here is the poor quality use of autotune. There is also a possibility that students will be too caught up in the music or novelty to fully listen to the lyrical content.

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Karina Le Meow's comment, October 29, 2013 1:22 AM
Sounds like jolly good fun!
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Quiz: The Cell Theory

Quiz: The Cell Theory | Cell Theory: an example of how science and technology has produced new evidence that has changed the way that we understand our world | Scoop.it
Quiz over the development of the cell theory focusing on scientists of the time such as Hooke, Virchow, Schleiden, and Schwann.
Alison Strong's insight:

This is a simple online quiz which can be used by students for their own self-assessment or revision. It could potentially be used in formative assessment as well.

The quiz helps to reinforce information about cell theory, its history and significant people who contributed to the understanding of cells. There are also links to similar quizzes on other cell topics.

This resource is quick and easy to use, and provides students with a mark as soon as they are complete, as well as providing the correct answers. Students can then go back and re-attempt questions.

 

Much of the focus of the questions is on scientific literacy. For example, one question asks the meaning of "cyto-", which introduces this as a prefix that signifies cells. There are also questions on distinguishing different types of cells and identifying organelles.

A considerable portion of it is identifying the people who contributed to cell theory and what their contributions were.

 

Online quizzes hold a certain appeal for younger students and the immediate results are gratifying. However, a weakness of this resource is that it is certainly not a "stand alone" resource, and may, to an extent, be completed by simple memorisation or guesswork by less engaged students.

 

If used as formative assessment, one must be mindful that students could manipulate results. For this reason, it would probably be more effective when used for self-assessment and revision.

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The wacky history of cell theory - Lauren Royal-Woods

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-wacky-history-of-cell-theory Scientific discovery isn't as simple as one good experiment. The weird and wonde...
Alison Strong's insight:

“The wacky history of cell theory” is a video by Lauren Royal-Woods. It presents a brief history of the scientific developments and theories that eventually led to the now-accepted cell theory. It is presented in casual and conversational manner, and often uses humour to maintain interest and accessibility. The video has captions available for people with hearing difficulties.

 

This resource offers an introduction to both cell theory and how scientific ideas change with time and new evidence. It would be suitable for stage 4 classes (both year 7 and 8).

In terms of cell theory, it explains that all living things are made up of cells, and touches on cell division in the idea that cells must come from pre-existing cells. This makes it a great resource for introducing the Living World topic and generating interest in both this topic and science in general.

 

Interspersed with the cell theory ideas through history are other interesting facts and events in science history, including disputes and competition between historical scientists which, while not contributing the education value of the video, creates interest and provides entertainment.

 

Another interesting aspect of the video come from the idea that scientific discoveries do not necessarily happen in structured environments and labs. This may compel students to see science as being more of an everyday activity that is more available to them.

 

One weakness of this resource is in its length. It runs for over 6 minutes and classes could lose interest towards the end. The spoken dialogue is also quite fast-paced, and this could create difficulties for students from non-English speaking backgrounds.

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Microscopes: Time Line

Physics, Microscopes, Nobel, Prize, Laureate, Educational
Alison Strong's insight:

This resource is a simple timeline that focuses on the development of the microscope. This resource could potentially be used in a Stage 4 class to emphasise the importance of the development of technologies in changing scientific understanding.

 

One appealing aspect of this resource is that it spans time from the 14th century up to 1981, demonstrating that this piece of technology is still being changed, improved and expanded upon after 600 years. This could generate some useful discussion questions.

 

 The timeline also notes the people who not only made significant contributions to microscope technology but also those who were awarded Nobel Prizes for their efforts.

The value of this source is that is moves away from the better known names in cell theory to names in microscopy and in doing so demonstrates just how much of a collaborative effort such advancements in science and technology are, as well as the importance of the interrelationship between call theory and microscopy.

 

A potential weakness of this source is that students must infer the significance of these advancements in microscopes, as there is no concurrent timeline on, or even reference to, cell theory. Perhaps, in a class setting, another resource could be provided to assist which such inferences; or the activity planned could draw on prior knowledge. A class task or activity could be set for students to identify the connections, for example, or to simply appreciate that the discoveries made were dependent on the technology available..
This suggests that this timeline may not be entirely effective as a stand-alone text but rather could be a valuable part of a complete lesson.

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The Cell: A Learning Tool

The Cell: an Interactive Learning Tool
Alison Strong's insight:

The Cell: an Interactive Learning Tool is a flash program resource that demonstrates the structures of cells and explains their functions in an easy-to-understand way. This resource has been specifically designed for early high school students and encourages students to "explore" both plant and animal cells. This means students can examine and learn components of cells at their own pace.

 

Holding the cursor over each cell organelle highlights it and produces a text explaination of that organelle and its function within the cell. The functions are explained in easy-to-understand language and contributes to scientific literacy by explaining scientific terms such as organelle names and other parts of cells.

The resource has both plant and animal cells so that the two can be compared and contrasted, and also contains interactive quizzes identifying the organelles of each cell, making this resource suitable for revision.

 

This resource could also be accompanied by comprehension-type activities to reinforce learning of the components of the cells and their structures and functions.

In terms of the SHE outcomes, this resource could be used to generate discussion of our understanding of cells, and and the detail of that understaning, as well as how technology has allowed us to view cells at such a small level, where once cells themselves were an unknown concept.

 

One weakness of this resource is that all information is provided through text, making it less accessible for students with poor literacy.

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