HSIE Stage 3 - Origins of Australia Day
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HSIE Stage 3 - Origins of Australia Day
CCS3.1 Explains the significance of particular people, places, groups, actions and events in the past in developing Australian identities and heritage.
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Coat of Arms worksheets

These worksheets are from a collection of resources from the National Archives of Australia. They test students on their knowledge of the Coat of Arms and the relevance of it to Australia’s national identity and process of unity. It includes questions about the symbols on the Coat of Arms, the roles of the Governor General and a colouring-in activity. It would be best for the teacher to explain the nature of the Coat of Arms and how it contributes to the Australian identity, as a background for students. These worksheets could be used as a teaching idea or an assessment task, depending on how much prior knowledge the students have. The teaching strategy would involve something like a take-home task, where students would individually research answers. For the colouring-in of the Coat of Arms, to deepen the students’ understanding of the task, the teacher could get students to label each part of the design, thus highlighting the significance of it to Australian history and identity. The extension activity of the student designing their own Coat of Arms for their school, club or family is helpful as it gets students to consider the meaning and purpose behind each element of the design. It will probably more difficult than expected – students must justify their choices. 

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Global Perspective: Australia Day 2011 - People's March

This video clip shows a People’s March in Melbourne on Australia Day in 2011. The parade is part of the celebrations of Australia Day and aims to showcase the variety of different cultures and ethnic groups in Australia. The source is helpful to students as they see the different national flags, national costumes and activities such as dance from these cultures. To understand Australia from an international perspective, students could use this video as a basis for investigating another cultural background in Australia and how they celebrate their national identity. As a teaching and literacy strategy, there could be an individual mix and match task as an introductory activity that tests students to see what cultural backgrounds they are aware of in Australia. The teacher could then create a mind map from an interactive software program, such as Gliffy, so the class can put together their thoughts from the mix and match task, and collate information and practices from each culture. The video would help motivate students to collaborate as a class (Berk, 2009, p. 2). Before the clip starts, the teacher would brief the students about what the clip was about and tell them what to look for. For an assessment task, students could be split into groups and each group research a different culture, for example Chinese or Lebanese, and how each culture celebrates their national identity. Another assessment idea is researching and creating a profile of a prominent Australia of an ethnic, ‘non-white’ cultural background and how they have contributed to Australian society. Video clips are an excellent method for students to gain an insight into different cultures as the visual component displays many aspects of the culture, such as clothing and cultural practices, that make is easier for students to understand. Teaching with videos and multimedia are highly effective for new learners and visual learners, however all students can benefit from it. This form of teaching can be helpful for students to “increase memory, comprehension, understanding, and deeper learning (Berk, 2009, p. 14).” Videos also make a large impact on a student’s mind and senses, and engages both hemispheres of the brain (Berk, 2009, pp. 2-3), thus making learning efficient.

 

 

Reference

 

Berk, R. A. (2009). Multimedia teaching with video clips: TV, movies, YouTube, and mtvU in the college classroom. International Journal of Technology in Teaching and Learning, 5(1), 1–21.

 

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History of Australia Day

This document gives a concise and detailed history of Australia Day. It starts from when Captain Arthur Phillip and the 11 convict ships from Great Britain landed at Sydney Cove in 1788. It then describes the process of the different states coming together and naming January 26 as ‘Australia Day’ and the various events and symbols in associating a national identity. It also includes a timeline of events at the end. As a teaching resource it is highly effective in providing students the basic facts, highlighting both the high and low points in the process of identifying Australia Day, even though it contains a lot of heavy political and historical information. As a teaching and literacy strategy, it would be helpful for the teacher to create a simplified timeline with some images to provide a clear understanding of the process of Australia Day to students. The teacher could also explain key words to make it easier to students to understand. The pictures throughout the document are a good supplement to the text and are helpful to students as they see a visual perspective. As an assessment task, students could research what happens in their local community and other larger communities on Australia Day. They would use this information to create a report and then present it to the class. Students are expected to use a variety of sources, including news articles (Australian Curriculum pp.4-5).

 

Reference

NSW Department of Education and Training. (2003). Australian Curriculum pp. 4-5

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Australian National Flag Association

Australian National Flag Association | HSIE Stage 3 - Origins of Australia Day | Scoop.it

This website provides information about the history of the Australian flag and the importance of the flag as a key aspect in Australia’s identity. The Australian flag is an important aspect of Australian history and is definitely included in history of Australia Day. It is a symbol of Australia and makes a large contribution to national identity. On the other hand, there is also the debate on whether there should be a new Australian flag.  While there aren’t necessarily any student activities on the site, teacher’s can use it as a resource to explain to students the history of the flag and the significance of the flag’s features. An introductory task could involve the students individually given a copy of the Australian flag. Without any information from the teacher or other resources, students must try and label each part of the flag and state why it is included in the design. This is challenging as most students would not be aware of the characteristics of the Australian flag. After teaching the flag’s design to students, an assessment task could involve the students being separated into groups and collaborating with one another. Group work has numerous benefits and allows students to share and expand on their ideas. Gilbert and Hoepper (2011, p. 145) state “cooperative learning in groups can enhance cognitive development and develop a greater capacity among students for reflection through exploratory talk.” In groups, students would produce a brochure outlining a new Australian flag they’ve designed together, explaining why they chose certain colours and symbols. This task will teach students to work collaboratively, researching and negotiating, while also assessing their understanding of why certain features are included in flag designs.

 

 

 

Reference

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment (4th ed.).  Cengage Learning Australia. 

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Indigenous Perspective: The First Australians.Ep1/7.pt.1/7 - They came to stay.

This YouTube video is an excerpt taken from the SBS documentary ‘The First Australians.’ The series first aired in Australia in October 2008 and presents the history of Australia from an Aboriginal perspective. Because the series are in seven episodes, the clip relevant to this outcome in stage three is part one, titled ‘They Have Come to Stay.’ This documents the Aborigines’ first impressions of the First Fleet when they arrived at Sydney Cove in 1788. The clip opens with a range of landscape shots of Australia and highlights the Aborigines importance to the land. This provides students with a historical context of Australia before it was colonised, providing students a background of the Australian land and the different Indigenous language groups settled within. It then describes how the Aborigines felt when the British first landed, which was confusion and some tension. Historians and writers give their opinions throughout the clip, favouring the Aboriginal perspective. The film was produced with the acknowledgement of Aboriginal descendants from the stories told, thus making it an authentic source. For example, SBS conducted face-to-face checks of the content of the script, and sought permission to film in specific areas. The clip is also accurate as the filmmakers have considered the rights of Indigenous people and the film’s cultural content, from the Indigenous Cultural and Intellectual Property (ICIP) rights (SBS, 2008). Some of these historians reflect an Indigenous background, adding to the credibility of the series.  Even though the video favours the Aboriginals’ point of view when the British arrive, when shown to students it gives them another perspective to consider when investigating the origins of Australia Day, as many educational studies in the past have considered little of an Aboriginal viewpoint. As a teaching strategy, students could go on an excursion to The Rocks to discover more about Australia’s heritage and British colonisation through a range of activities (Macquarie Educational Tours, 2012). Another teaching technique could involve students acting out a role play. Students would be split into two groups, one group representing the Aborigines and the other the British, with a few people representing main Aboriginal figures and another, Captain Arthur Phillip. This would get students to empathise with the Aborigines as they would act out how the they would have felt, being invaded by ‘white people.’ To follow up, the class would discuss the different feelings and emotions felt between the two groups. Role play is beneficial to students as it gives them “direct experience with the content of an issue, and provides an opportunity to develop skills such as perspective taking, problem solving, and negotiation (Gilbert & Hoepper, p. 149)." An assessment task could include students writing a report about how Aborigines lived prior to British arrival – particularly their relationship with the land.

 

References

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment (4th ed.). Cengage Learning Australia.

 

Macquarie Educational Tours. (2012). British Colonisation. Retrieved April 15, 2013, from http://schoolexcursions.net/sydney.php

 

SBS. (2008). First Australians. Retrieved April 15, 2013, from http://www.sbs.com.au/firstaustralians/about

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