Stage 2 James Cook HSIE
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Teaching strategies | Global Education

Teaching strategies | Global Education | Stage 2 James Cook HSIE | Scoop.it
Caitlin Barker's insight:

Developing a global perspective will come from continuously broadening one's views. Writing descriptions of the Aboriginals and James Cook at the first point of the topic will determine how the teacher is to use the presentations. Using the teaching strategy "stereotypes" I find that this will be a useful way to explore global perspectives. For HSIE it would come under the knowledge and understandings of 'Social Justice and Human Rights'. In this way, students will be able to distinguish acts of racism, discrimination and prejudice. The associated activities will prove beneficial in ingraining ideas into students. A possible further way to engage students in understanding global perspectives would be to do a persuasive presentation. The ability to deliver persuasive presentations is important across all stages and KLA's. The skills and processes students may gain from a persuasive presentation especially on stereotypes would be being able to demonstrate empathy with different perspectives (Captain James Cook's stereotype/perspective of the Aboriginals as well as the Aboriginal's perspective/stereotype of James Cook). Wholly, the assessment task would comprise half the class delivering a persuasive presentation with from the perspective of the Aboriginals and the other half presenting on the perspective of James Cook whilst attempting to incorporate stereotypes and perspectives of other countries. Students will learn about both perspectives whilst gaining a global perspective on social justice, developing empathy and distinguishing acts of racism which will prepare them for their own futures. A Flow Chart could further be used to demonstrate a timeline and in turn identify what were the key time points which evoked these stereotypes. Group work would also work especially well here, allowing the children to work together to quash any unwanted opinions or stereotypes.

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Cook's secret instructions | Treasure Explorer

Caitlin Barker's insight:

This website contains great information which I believe would be appealing to students as it is about the 'secrets' and hints that were made about Captain Cook and his voyage.There is a 'treasure' which are secret maps of Cook's as well as diary entries. There is a lot of text, but I believe it will be interesting as students are to decode the information to find what secrets Cook was hiding in the letters provided. There are extracts from Cook's secret instructions as well as Lord Morton's hints to Captain Cook. The questions that are provided on the website require higher order thinking especially as the answers need to be thought of based on the text, instead of finding the answers in the text as a simple comprehension. I quite like the associated classroom activities for primary school as it provides a range of different activities under the headings: Remember, understand, communicate, create, investigate & ICT. I think it is good that there are a range of activities as it allows the teacher to assign different activities to students who can only work effectively in one learning form for example or for those who need extra practice with computers or public speakign for example. As a result of this, it does touch on literacy outcomes and in turn increasing the range of students abilities, especially for NAPLAN preparation. The National Library of Australia has created these resources in a way that makes students feel like they are investigating and important, rather than just doing work or comprehending which is very important.

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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, May 6, 2013 2:37 AM

Interactive online resources for teaching about James Cook using historical inquiry from the National Library of Australia. 

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British+colonisation+unit.pdf

Caitlin Barker's insight:

This is an excellent unit of work based around British Colonisation to be used before and after a visit to Sydney Tower to explore the heritage. The whole document is excellent in terms of providing teach plans and associated activities, however the focus for learning about the voyage of James Cook in relation to British colonialisation at the time will be on "Lesson 3" in the document. It describes the outcomes assessed, the resources needed for the lesson, any pre-requisites a progression of the lesson. Specific enquiry questions are posed for each lesson which help students in knowing what they are expected to gain from the end of the lesson. The activity provided is that student's read through the provided fact sheets and they are to fill in the storyboard with events in his voyage and draw what plants and animals he may have encountered. The excursion is not entirely necessary, but from my experience, some students have never been into the City so it would be a good experience to see all the aspects of his voyage and perhaps where the Aboriginals were living. The activity of creating the storyboard can encapsulate aspects of the Creative Arts syllabus and comprehension of the information.fact sheets can address some English reading outcomes. What is not provided is an assessment task to fully gauge students learning, so perhaps a cloze passage or short quiz could be created to encapsulate the main enquiry questions and the main ideas that students should still remember at the end of the unit such that they should not just be regurgitating the information from the fact sheets as we would rather them be able to apply and remember the information in the future.

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State Library of New South Wales /Catalogue

Caitlin Barker's insight:

This book is the story of Australia, written and illustrated by Aboriginal children. It is in this way that it is an extremely unique text and has been written in a way for both children and adults to understand. It is an extremely different perspective to most resources you will find on the internet. It is almost written like a recount. There is a lot of emotion involved/a heavy emphasis placed on how the "whitefellas" were acting and how the Aboriginals felt. The Aboriginals are very scared to be encountering white people and this is something we do not usually read about. 

Because of the focus on the emotions felt by all invovled, a good task could be to pick either a white person or an Aboriginal and draw/paint how they think their emotion would be, based on reading the relevant pages in the book (the book details all of Australia across different time periods and thus particular pages are only on James Cook's arrival). Furthermore, a diorama could be created from the perspective of the Aboriginals upon encountering James Cook and his men. From a literacy perspective, BASED UPON reading the book and understanding the Aboriginal's perspective, students could write a journal entry, or series of entries from the point of view of James Cook. It should be emphasised that they are to write the journal entry only from what they have read in the book and for this reason, perhaps this book should be the introductory lesson to the topic. A further activity that would be excellent resulting from this text is a simulation or role playing activity and they are a powerful way to engage students and demonstrate concepts and ideas including raising notions of cooperation and group work (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p.145).. I would strongly suggest all teachers use this as an Aboriginal perspective espcially as it is written by Aboriginal children. In terms of the book's validity as an ATSI source, the authors are Aboriginal children and acknowledges their participation in the text. There is not an overrepresentation of men and no derogatory terms describing ATSI people. It can be read by everyone, not solely ATSI's. It does not perpetuate terra nullius, nor overgeneralise and is also up to date. It quite clearly satisfies authenticity standards. The illustrations are thus accurate as well, being drawn by Aboriginal children.

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A Brief Aboriginal History

A Brief Aboriginal History | Stage 2 James Cook HSIE | Scoop.it
Caitlin Barker's insight:

This page provides a history of Aboriginals in Australia. It contains exercpts from texts and speech which will help students more accurately understand perspective. At the stage 2 year levels, students should be able to read the website themselves, or it could be printed off and handed to students. Ideally, one paragraph/heading should be focused on at a time so as to create a deeper understanding. What is particularly good about this text is that it does not seem to be coming entirely from the perspective of the Europeans or the Aboriginals. It describes the devastations for the Aboriginals as well as the 'obliviousness' of the Europeans. Using this resource, perhaps students could make a timeline of events (incorporating mathematics). This also provides an opportunity for teachers to explain the term terra nullius from differing points of view and based on the text - students can determine whether Australia really was terra nullius. This could also be used to incorporate a global persepctive through social justice (with reference to the disease and devastation that the Europeans brought) and how James Cook's voyage began to destroy the Aboriginals' way of life. In terms of this text's reliability as an appropriate source, it is an up to date text and does not over-generalise or perpetuate the term terra nullius. It acknowledges that there were over 400 different nations and those does not stereotype Aboriginal as 'one'. What is concerning is their choice of images which over-represents men, especially as this text is produced by the Aboriginal Heritage Office. It is further endorsed by several local councils and Government Departments.

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