Those Who Came Before Us
19 views | +0 today
Follow
Those Who Came Before Us
Stage 2 HSIE - The original inhabitants of the local community area
Curated by Lauren Chapman
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Lauren Chapman
Scoop.it!

education - Colonisation on ASO - Australia's audio and visual heritage online

education - Colonisation on ASO - Australia's audio and visual heritage online | Those Who Came Before Us | Scoop.it
Video clips related to Colonisation that have teachers notes on australianscreen.
Lauren Chapman's insight:

This resource provides a varied array of support texts for teachers when explaining the notion of heritage and the original inhabitants of the land to stage two students. As the resource is both audio and visual by nature, both students and teacher are presented with a new way of understanding and connecting with the Australia’s heritage. Teacher’s can use this resource to understand different elements of Australia’s colonial history and present this information to students in a way that is effective and engaging. As students explore this resource, they will think about questions and topics that they would like to know more about and this of more way to source answers that are not simply written. Students will record information presented in the online resource. In the lesson, students will individually write up five things that they would like to know more about in relation their local community and think of a person they could ask (parents, other teachers, friends, grandparents etc). In their own time, students will conduct an interview with their selected person and share their findings with the class. This lesson will seek to encourage students to seek out ways of ‘collecting information about their school and local community by direct and indirect experiences, including interviewing members of the community’ (NSW BOS, 2006, p 57). 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lauren Chapman from ClioEDtech
Scoop.it!

Interactives . United States History Map . Intro

Interactives . United States History Map . Intro | Those Who Came Before Us | Scoop.it

Become a geography whiz as you learn how the United States was settled.
Discover how the continent was irrevocably changed by European colonization, the events that caused the wholesale displacement and decimation of the land's original inhabitants, and how the 50 states came to be formed.


Via Jennifer Dorman
Lauren Chapman's insight:

This resource would be used in a lesson series exploring the far reaching consequences of European colonization and the impact of such upon the original inhabitants of the land. Not only does this resource provide students with an opportunity to practice and develop their map reading skills, it provides them, also with and understanding of time and place. This resource will be used in a series of five lessons exploring the nature of European colonization and the impact of this upon the original inhabitants of the land. The aim of the lesson incorporating the above resource is to compare and contrast the effect of colonization on a global scale and to examine the way that this has shaped not only Australia but other countries also. Within this lesson, students will be given the opportunity to explore the components of the interactive map and make connections between this resource and those presented earlier on in the lesson series. Students will  make their own interactive map (using paper, and pop up tabs) of their local community area, using work done in prior lessons as a reference point.  Students will be assessed on the way they verbally compare their maps with the resource and discuss similarities and differences.

Students will be encouraged to think critically about the impact of colonization on different cultures throughout the world, using their own country as a reference point. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lauren Chapman from Indigenous Culture, Our Roots
Scoop.it!

Aboriginal Bird Art | Cave Painting Australian Aboriginal Art

Aboriginal Bird Art | Cave Painting Australian Aboriginal Art | Those Who Came Before Us | Scoop.it
Cave Painting Australian Aboriginal Art. art aboriginal dot painting artists gallery art shows. Home · Contact · Privacy · Sitemap · T&C. Search for: Recent Posts. Aboriginal Bird Art · Aboriginal Cultures · Indigenous Australian ...

Via Fusion Tourism
Lauren Chapman's insight:

The Australian Aboriginal art resource provides students with a unique opportunity to view Indigenous art through photograph and screen. Students will be asked to think about the ways in which these works of art have impacted the local area and whether or not they think this will guide future preservation of the ideas and themes presented by the artist in the local area. Students will endeavor to create their own place-based artwork (on paper) and write down the intended audience, message and geographical area in which the artwork would be situated. Students will then reflect upon their creation and imaginatively write about the impact of their artwork on future residents and visitors to the local area and discuss ways in which individuals in the local community shape the direction of and preservation of local values and ideas.  With collection of student work samples, students will be assessed on their ability to discuss the link between people and place as they write about the impact that their artwork could have on generations to come. This activity consolidates knowledge gained throughout the lesson series as they reflect on the impact that people who came before them has had upon the land in which they live now. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lauren Chapman from Explains how shared customs, practices, symbols, languages and traditions in communities contribute to Australian and community identities
Scoop.it!

SBS: First Australians

SBS: First Australians | Those Who Came Before Us | Scoop.it

Via Rachael Jenkins
Lauren Chapman's insight:

This resource is a powerful and deeply moving resource, which allows students to gain insight into the journey of British colonist and what this meant for indigenous Australians. This series is well presented and researched which holds an invaluable Indigenous perspective as Aboriginal Academics have had an active role in the development of this documentary series. This resource is beneficial for teachers to grasp a deeper understanding of Australian history and provokes an emotive response, which enables teachers to teach from a viewpoint of personal attachment rather than a simple presentation of facts. Not only, is this resource of great assistance to teachers for understanding Australian history, it is of value when used appropriately to support students understanding of stage two HSIE. As the series is highly emotive and possibly graphic at times, stage two students would only be show clips of various episodes and not the whole series. As this resource will be used in the first lesson of the series, students will be introduced to the topic and brainstorm what they know about pre-colonial Australia. Students will watch a short clip of the documentary and discuss the key values and customs that were obvious in the stories of both Indigenous and Colonial Australians.

Students will take time to think-pair-share about what they think would come up as obvious values, traditions, symbols and customs if the documentary was done in their local area (Balmain East) and discuss ways in which these are different or similar to that which they would appear if the documentary was done in their area in pre-colonial and colonial times.

The aim of this lesson is to enlighten students to the notion that past people and events of our local area shape the development and preservation of the customs and traditions that we see (or no longer see) today.

When used sparingly and thoughtfully, this series wonderfully compliments the ideas presented in the proposed lesson sequence, as it would provide students with a direct connection to the people who have gone before them and ask they to connect personally with individuals in the stories presented. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lauren Chapman from Explains how shared customs, practices, symbols, languages and traditions in communities contribute to Australian and community identities
Scoop.it!

BaramiBarabuguWalkTour.pdf

‘Barani, Barrabugu/ Yesterday, Tomorrow’ is a booklet created by the City of Sydney’s history program in conjunction with members from the City of Sydney’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander advisory panel. It was created for the Sustainable Sydney 2030 Strategy to provide a history of sites within the City of Sydney that are linked to the history of the Aboriginal people. This booklet concentrates on the journey of the people of the Eora language


Via Rachael Jenkins
Lauren Chapman's insight:

This resource allows students to make a connection to place, present, past and future. By allowing students to explore a resource around the significance of place for people in times past and present, student cognitively make connections between the studied place and that which they themselves belong to. This resource enables students to understand the impact that people have upon their environment and the affect that the land has upon individuals to which they belong. Students are encouraged to reflect critically on this resource and think about the impact of such on the preservation of Indigenous culture within the Sydney community. The booklet provides a practical framework for teaching about the original inhabitants of the land and achieves this through both visual and written channels. Information is presented categorically which allows students to understand the impact of inhabitants on the local community and supports them in making sense of the text. This resource will be used as a template for students to craft their own walking Tour of their local area where they will be asked to reflect on different significant places and the people who have walked before them and called it home. Along with the lesson framework, teachers can further utilize this resource by organizing an excursion through City of Sydney Walking Tours. “Partaking in such activities would encourage active learning and help children to see connections between objects and life” (Dogan, 2010). Thoughtful use of this resource provides students with a unique opportunity to immerse themselves in history in a hands-on manner, “visiting a museum is a particularly useful way to increase student interest and knowledge as they promote active learning, provide the opportunity to work first hand with sources and they encourage students to learn through different methods” (Dogan, 2010). Use of this resource, along with lesson series, aims to enhance student’s understanding of the relationship between place and person and explore the impact of colonization upon the preservation or destruction of place-based identity. 

more...
No comment yet.