Stage 2: Captain James Cook
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We Call them Pirates Out Here

We Call them Pirates Out Here | Stage 2: Captain James Cook | Scoop.it
The reworking of significant historical works is a potent artistic tool for commentary on Australia’s history, past and present.
Tamara Farrell's insight:

This website is a fantastic resource for both teachers and students. Daniel Boyd, an Indigenous artist presents his recreation of the famous Phillip Fox artwork The Landing of Captain Cook at Botany Bay, 1770.  The artwork We Call them Pirates out here, 2006 demonstrates the Aboriginal perspective of Captain Cook landing in Botany Bay. According to the Queensland governments’ document Embedding Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Perspectives in schools…

 

“Weaving the Indigenous story into the fabric of education through teaching about Indigenous cultures and perspectives in schools has been identified nationally as key to improving outcomes for Indigenous peoples… [it] will enhance the educational experiences of non-Indigenous students as well… [by giving] them a more accurate and richer understanding of Australia’s history and culture, it will help them to understand how we got to where we are today; and how we might move forward together.” (pp.9)

Due to the importance of embedding Aboriginal perspectives, I would use this resource within a sequence of lessons exploring the Aboriginal Perspectives of Captain Cook’s invasion, as it requires an extensive amount of knowledge to understand the differences.

 

Before the lesson, the teacher can use the website to become familiar with the artwork and the artists intentions in changing certain aspects and leaving others the same. There is a video that teachers can view (or even show part of it to the class) where the artist discusses his intentions behind his work. As a class, students play a game of ‘spot the difference’ between the original artwork and Daniel Boyd’s artwork (using printed versions or on IWB). The teacher uses prompting and questioning to help the student understand what the artist is trying to say: e.g. what do you know about pirates? What are they like? Why do you think the artist chose to represent Captain Cook in this way?

Some of the content may be too difficult for a stage 2 classroom, so the teacher may need to alter the amount of scaffolding according to the needs of the learners. E.g. teacher could separate students into groups to discuss a certain aspect of the painting and come back together as a class to discuss what is found OR the lesson could be a whole class discussion. This collaborative learning is essential when students are tackling challenging content and it is a key to Vygotsky's zone of proximal development theory (Vygotsky, 1978).

 

As this activity requires a lot of pre-existing knowledge regarding the events of Captain Cook’s voyage and how the Aboriginal people felt, it would be positioned towards the end of a unit and the teacher can use this activity as a form of formative assessment. Furthermore, this resource is exceptional in exploring other KLA’s such as creative arts and English. The ability to decode visual texts for meaning is essential in English and creative arts and thus could be used in conjunction with each other. 

 

 

REFERENCES:
Embedding Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspectives in schools A guide for school learning communities.. (2011). Brisbane, Qld.: Dept. of Education and Training. 
 

Vygotsky, L.S. (1978). Mind in Society: The development of higher psychological processes. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, Chapter 4. 

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The Endeavour replica

The Endeavour replica | Stage 2: Captain James Cook | Scoop.it
HMB Endeavour, replica
Tamara Farrell's insight:

This is an exceptional resource for stage 2 primary HSIE. The website has information about the Endeavour replica which is a permanent exhibit of the Australian National Maritime Museum. It details the layout of the ship in the form of a pdf document that can be distributed to students or viewed on the computer.

The website also has a virtual tour of the replica Endeavour itself from many different points in the ship. This website could be used in the classroom in isolation where the students explore the ship James Cook travelled on to Australia or be used as before/after an excursion to the museum.

 

For example, students could view the website in pairs and construct a picture of the layout of the ship on butchers paper, using the provided ship specifications picture and information found from the virtual tour (construction has explict numeracy links). Once this has been completed, students discuss how Captain Cook and the other explorers would have felt being on a small ship (only 32m long) for such a long period of time. This can lead into lessons about Scurvy and how Cook minimised its occurrence on the Voyages.
 

According to Dr. Michael Laitman and Dr. Anatoly Ulianov (2011), excursions facilitate a multifaceted perception of the world.

Thus, it would be extremely beneficial for students to partcipate on this excurison. This website could be used to assist in assessment at the conclusion of the excursion to the museum. Students are required to write a reflection of the excursion (what they saw, what they learnt, how it made them feel etc.) and can use the website to jog there memories and enhance their description of specific areas in the reflection.

 


REFERENCE:

Laitman, M., & Uilanov, A. (2011). Chapter 6: A Multifaceted Perception Of The World. The Psychology of the Integral Society Lanham: Bnei Baruch/Laitman Kabbalah.

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ABC TV: Captain Cook

ABC TV: Captain Cook | Stage 2: Captain James Cook | Scoop.it
Tamara Farrell's insight:

This website is a fantastic online resource as it allows children to explore James Cook’s voyages in an interactive way. The site has interactive timelines of all the voyages where you can click into Cook’s different stops and read information, watch videos and read diary excerpts about what occurred at that point in the voyage. It also has information about his early life before the voyages and in the Navy.

 

This site can be used in many different activities, for example: students can develop their own detailed timeline of the first voyage focussing on the arrival and departure in Australia. Students click onto the dates and record who, what, when, where and the significance of that stop. This website is a great starting point for understanding the voyage and getting a broad idea of Captain Cook’s discoveries.

 

This website can also be used for students to get a brief biography of Captain Cook’s life; students can explore the tabs on the website and write down important facts in chronological order. According to Gilbert and Hoepper, (2011) “ICT provides unprecedented opportunities for engaging students in learning in new ways” ( p.181). To utilise ICT as much as possible, students could create a word or power point document displaying their findings using words and images found on the website; e.g. word and image timeline. Further than that, the students could begin to create their own interactive timeline using websites such as tiki toki or dipity. As they learn more about the voyage, they can add more information to the timeline.

 

I recommend using this site in your primary classroom as it is fun, interactive and educational all at the same time!

 

 

REFERENCE:

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia (pg.181).

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Teaching strategies | Global Education

Teaching strategies | Global Education | Stage 2: Captain James Cook | Scoop.it
Tamara Farrell's insight:

This is an excellent teachers resource that can be used whilst teaching about Captain Cook. The resource outlines teaching strategies to ensure that a global perspective is used throughout the teaching of complex and controversial issues.

As there is much bias around different stories of Captain Cook, it is essential for teachers to employ global perspective strategies in their classroom to ensure that all perspectives are taken into account. For example, teachers could use the following lesson idea on bias:

 

“Create a display of photos of issues around the room. Ask students to move around and write their own captions. Use the captions to compare different perspectives.”

The teacher could use this idea and put a variety of pictures up around the room of Captain Cook’s voyage and when he reached Australia. Students will then compare and contrast what they wrote for each picture, ultimately demonstrating how everyone has a different perspective, even from just looking at a picture.This can be a lead into the idea that the English people have differing perspectives to the Australian Aboriginals concerning Captain cook’s arrival.
 

This resource has many other ideas that can be used while teaching this unit like examining fact vs. opinion. An assessment that embedds global perspectives can be one that examines fact vs. opinion. For example, each student is given an article created by the teacher at the conclusion of the topic that includes many facts and different opinions regarding the voyage of Captain Cook. The students then have to identify in a table what is fact and what is opinion. As a class, students discuss with the teacher what is fact and what is opinion and give reasons why. Not only is this skill important for this topic, it is an extremely important Literacy and Numeracy general capability across the whole Australian Curriculum. 

 

Furthermore, this is supported by pedagogy as according to the Director of Global Education NSW (2001-2010) Dr. Susan Bliss by incorporating global perspectives "Students learn to take responsibility for their actions, respect and value diversity and see themselves as global citizens who can contribute to a more equal, peaceful, just and sustainable world." This resource is essential in helping students and teachers become global citizens. 

 

 

REFERENCE:

Bliss, Dr. S. (n.d.). Primary Human Society and It's Environment (HSIE).Global Education Resources. Retrieved April 20, 2013, from www.ptc.nsw.edu.au/SiteMedia/w3svc361/Uploads/Documents/GLOBAL%20PERSPECTIVES%20-%20PRIMARYDOC..pdf

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Captain Cook's Journal During the First Voyage Round the World

Captain Cook's Journal During the First Voyage Round the World | Stage 2: Captain James Cook | Scoop.it
Tamara Farrell's insight:

This eBook is the official journal of Captain James Cook’s first Voyage. This resource is extremely useful for the teachers learning. Teachers can read the journal to gain important insight into the voyage before teaching the unit of work on Captain Cook.

 

This resource could be used within the classroom for students to explore. It is important to note that there is a lot of metalanguage and difficult vocabulary within the journals. This means that there must be high support for the students when the text is being read. Furthermore, this resource would be beneficial for its strong literacy links as "students need to develop sophisticated language skills" (Gilbert and Hoepper, 2011, p. 160).

 

For example, as a class, students read together Chapter 8: Exploration of East Coast of Australia, April 1770 From Sunday 29th.  The teacher uses prompting and questioning to help students decode the text for meaning and students write down a glossary of terms as they read. The reading will take a large amount of time and while the reading is beneficial, the teacher must be flexible in how much is read at one time due to the level of difficulty.

After reading, as a class, students write down a recount of what they have just read in their own words.
From this point, there are two different activities I would consider using in the classroom:

1. Students are to design an interview transcript between themselves and Captain Cook asking about his feelings and experiences when he landed in and explored the East Coast of Australia. They are to then to swap this interview with a partner and attempt to answer the questions from the knowledge they have learnt in the journal and the rest of the topic

2. Students are to re-write teacher selected events in the journal from the perspective of an Australian Aboriginal (following a lesson dedicated to the Australian Aboriginal perspective).

 

 

REFERENCE:

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia. (pg. 160).

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