Stage 1 - Systems for Producing Goods and Services
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Community Helpers - 'People in our Town' by Sarah McGee

An eBook on community helpers in our town.

Via Yvette
Tim Ridgeway's insight:

This resource is an online e-book reading of the text 'People in our Town' by Sarah McGee. The aim of the text is to help students understand the different types of systems in the community that are used to provide services to people. This resource presents occupations in an inclusive and gender-neutral way (e.g. a firefighter, not a fireman), making it an excellent resource for children to learn from without developing any gender bias.

 

One of the key features of this resource that helps to engage students in meaningful learning is the use of prediction. When introducing each of the community learners, the reader asks a predictive question - who am I? Throughout the playing of the video in class, the teacher can pause before each person is revealed, allowing students to actively predict and ensure all students are paying attention and engaged with the task. After the e-book has been read, the teacher can consolidate knowledge by listing out the list of services provided on the board, and getting students to label them.

 

The students must use their prior knowledge and experiences in order to predict who the community helper will be. The use of predictions encourages engagement between classmates and the teacher, facilitating an active learning environment in the classroom. Furthermore, the way the text links to prior knowledge and experiences promotes a very experiential method of learning, as outlined in Gilbert and Hoepper (2011). They state that a key factor in learning is to "use personal experiences as a context for applying knowledge" (p. 143). Using this method of learning, all students are able to share their own unique experiences to the class, and share these experiences to help solve a problem.

 

To incorporate this video with classroom activities, the teacher can provide cards or colouring-in pictures for the students to label correctly. Furthermore, the teacher could provide images of certain buildings (e.g. a shopping center) and ask students what sorts of people provide services there (e.g. a butcher). Using EN1-2A of the English K-10 Syllabus (2012), students could write a recount of an event in which they were provided a service (e.g. 'I went to the letter-box and a mail carrier gave me a letter). This fulfils outcome EN1-2A by demonstrating that students can compose a simple text on a familiar topic (BOS, 2012).

 

References:

BOS (2012). English K-10 syllabus: volume 1: English K-6. Sydney: Board of Studies

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (Eds). (2011). Teaching Society and Environment.  Australia: Cengage Learning. 

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Yvette 's curator insight, April 17, 2013 6:06 AM

 

This resource is an e-book reading of the story ‘People in Our Town’ by Sarah McGee, which helps students understand the systems in place for producing services in the community. It is a very interactive and engaging story as it provides an opportunity for the students to guess who each community helper is and the services they provide in the community before the answer is shown. The depth of 'Pedagogical Content Knowledge' is the way in which subject matter is altered for teaching, which can be done using this resource as it demonstrates how "the teacher interprets the subject matter and finds different ways to represent it and make it accessible to learners" (Koehler & Mishra, 2006, p.1021). A good lesson idea would be to show the reading and pause the video before each answer is shown so the children are actively participating in the lesson. The teacher should recap on the idea that a community helper is someone who provides a service to help the community. The class could have a discussion and draw a chart on the board to distinguish the community helpers who work to keep us safe, which ones keep community members healthy and those who help us to learn. A lesson activity could involve asking a community helper to come in to the school and the students could undertake a literacy activity by writing down 3 questions they could ask the community helper about their service. This would be a great way of teaching through first-hand stories and an understanding of the system in place for the service to work in the community. An assessment task involving the students creating their own flashcards with an drawn image of a community helper on the front and a description of what and how the service is provided on the back. This form of assessment reduces the negative connotations that are linked with assessment task but instead makes it an enjoyable activity for the students whilst also supporting learning “by clarifying expectations and providing feedback to students on their progress” (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p.124).

 

Reference List:

-Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching society and environment 4th edition. South Melbourne, Australia: Cengage Learning Australia Pty Limited

- Mishra, P., & Koehler, M.J. (2006). Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge: A Framework for Teacher Knowledge. Columbia: Teachers College Record, pp. 1017–1054.

 

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Making Mud Bricks in Rwanda, Africa - YouTube

Shows the process used to make mud bricks and the economics of being in the mud brick business.
Tim Ridgeway's insight:

Global resource - Making Mud Bricks in Rwanda, Africa.

 

This global resource is a YouTube video that highlights the process by which the people of Rwanda, Africa, make mud bricks to build houses and other structures. Furthermore, the video also explains the financial aspects of the mud brick trade.

 

When looking at the Global Perspectives Framework (2008), this resource particularly addresses interdependence and globalisation factors such as the impact of technologies used to produce good and services, the political factors surrounding the entire mud brick trade in Rwanda, the environmental and geographical consequences of producing mud bricks due to inefficiencies in the production process, and particularly the economic aspect surrounding supply and demand.

 

In relation to the core subject matter of 'systems for producing goods and services', this video will assist students in "identifying the resources used by people who work and where they come from, e.g. source of building materials, country of origin", as well as "identifies different goods and services that fulfill their needs" (BOS, 2006, p. 34). Students can explore the materials that are used to construct mud bricks (e.g. water, earth, straw), the 'supply and demand' aspect of brick making, as well as the different types of materials that can be used to make shelter (a basic need).

 

An example activity that the students could partake in would focus on the materials used to build shelter, much like the video. The class would investigate the systems used to produce the mud bricks in Rwanda (the technique shown in the video) and compare it to how bricks are made in other parts of the world (e.g. a local brick factory). Students can explore the materials bricks are made of and how much they cost. For tasks such as these, it is best for the teacher to use both formal and informal assessment strategies such as worksheets and observing class discussions (e.g. what would we use a mud brick for?) in order to best judge the achievement outcome of the students.

 

When looking at connections across the curriculum, there are clear links to the new Australian Mathematics K-10 Syllabus (2012). In the video, the narrator states that each brick costs five cents (2:22). Using outcome MA1-6NA (using multiplication and division), the teacher could ask, "If one brick costs five cents, how much would it cost to buy four bricks?"

 

References:

Australian Government. (2008). Global perspectives: a framework for global education in Australian schools. Carlton South Victoria: Curriculum Corporation.

 

BOS. (2006). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus.  Retrieved 6 April, 2014 from http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/wps/portal/go/hsie

 

BOS (2012). English K-10 syllabus: volume 1: English K-6. Sydney: Board of Studies

 

NSW Institute of Teachers (2012). National Professional Standards for Teachers. Sydney, Australia: Author.

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Pocket Money Problem and Home to Bank Game

Tim Ridgeway's insight:

Pocket Money Scenario (handout 1) - http://www.makingcents.com.au/_assets/Pocket_money_scenario.pdf

 

Home to Bank Game (handout 2) - http://www.makingcents.com.au/nsw/stage1/game_hometobank.pdf

 

The 'pocket money problem' and financial literacy game is a teacher's resource that outlines a sequence of activities that not only relates to mathematics, but also encompasses many aspects relating to children's resource systems. The core concept behind the activities strongly links to the production of goods and services as it addresses concepts such as those who provide goods and services (e.g. the bank, parents), as well as linking with other economic concepts such as supply and demand. While there are many economical aspects to this resource, it encompasses the key idea of basic needs and wants in a variety of contexts.  

 

The activities center around the handling and allocation of money in a primary school context, allowing students to connect the content with their own prior knowledge, a practice that the Quality Teaching Framework (2003) encourages through "drawing clear connections between students' past experiences and identities, with contexts outside of the classroom and with multiple ways of knowing or cultural perspective. Furthermore, activities that demonstrate connectedness to the world are prime examples of what is known as 'experiential learning'. This approach to learning involves "addressing real world issues , using personal experiences as a contect for applying knowledge, and generating products of learning that contribute to some real context beyond school (Gilbert and Hoepper, 2011, p. 143). An example of this outside the classroom would be using the canteen to buy lunch - students will be able to identify that some items are classed as a 'need' (for example, a bottle of water), what what is left over they can allocate to something they don't necessarily need, but 'want' (e.g. a candy bar).

 

The scenario and game can be adapted for different currencies, allowing a diverse range of students (including students who may have recently arrived in the country, allowing them to participate using their own cultural context if they have trouble speaking English or are unfamiliar with Australian currency).

 

This resource is extremely relevant to outcome SSS1.7 of the NSW K-6 HSIE Syllabus (2006) as it allows students to demonstrate "the different forms of monetary exchange, eg cash, credit card, cheque", as well as "identifying different goods and services that fulfill their

needs", working together.to assist students in making the connection between monetary exchange and needs and wants. This knowledge can be used outside the classroom in many contexts, from managing their own pocket money to purchasing other goods and services. Furthermore, this resource has many mathematical aspects surrounding it; from the addition and subtraction of money to dividing equal amounts of money into groups for allocation.

 

References:

BOS. (2006). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus.  Retrieved 6 April, 2014 from http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/wps/portal/go/hsie

 

Department of Education and Training. (2003). Quality teaching in NSW public schools. Retrieved March 30, 2014, from: https://www.det.nsw.edu.au/proflearn/docs/pdf/qt_EPSColor.pdf

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (Eds). (2011). Teaching Society and Environment.  Australia: Cengage Learning. 

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Goods and Services Archives | BrainPOP Educators

Goods and Services Archives | BrainPOP Educators | Stage 1 - Systems for Producing Goods and Services | Scoop.it
Tim Ridgeway's insight:

BrainPOP and BrainPOP Jr. are excellent websites that provide teacher's resources, interactive games and educational video for students from kindergarten to Year 3. The overall focus on what good and services are encompasses outcome SSS1.7 of the NSW HSIE Syllabus (2006), allowing students to look at goods and services in real-life contexts, from the people who provide goods and services in their local area to the different systems around the world and how producers and consumers interact with each other.

 

A key feature of this resource that is especially useful for students is that it clearly defines the terms 'goods' and 'services', which makes this resource a good tool to introduce the topic of goods and services to them. The interactive games and videos are appropriate for a Stage 1 level, with animated cartoons that Stage 1 students will find very engaging. The information and communications technologies (ICT) aspect is also a very central focus to the key learning points of the resource, as "the use of ICT helps to increase the motivation of certain children to learn...it provides opportunities for engaging students in learning in new ways" (Gilbert and Hoepper, 2011, p. 181). The engaging nature of the resource will encourage students to learn and participate in classroom activities while engaging in meaningful discussion with their fellow peers.

 

What also makes this resource a valuable and meaningful tool for students is that it helps them to engage in contexts outside the school environment that are relevant to them. When using the Quality Teaching Discussion Paper (DET, 2003) to make learning activities that are significant, teachers should link "the prior knowledge from which students work; the social, demographic and cultural backgrounds of students, families and the local community." With this in mind, students can explore providers of goods and services in their area, and compare it to how goods and services are provided somewhere else (for example, students can compare how buying vegetables from a large supermarket in the city is different from buying fruit from a farm in a rural region).

 

BrainPOP also provides resources that link with other KLA from across the curriculum. For example, supply and demand games with counters or jellybeans is a great way to engage students in mathematics, while colouring-in pictures will allow the teacher to assess outcomes in the Creative Arts strand.

 

References:

BOS. (2012). NSW Syllabus for the Australian Curriculum:  English K-10 Syllabus. Retrieved 6 April, 2014 from http://syllabus.bos.nsw.edu.au/download/

 

DET. (2003). Aboriginal Education K-12 Resource Guide. Retrieved 6 April, 2014 from http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/schoollibraries/assets/pdf/aboriginalresourceguide.pdf

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (Eds). (2011). Teaching Society and Environment.  Australia: Cengage Learning. 

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Aboriginal Housing - Creative Spirits

Aboriginal Housing - Creative Spirits | Stage 1 - Systems for Producing Goods and Services | Scoop.it
Take a look beyond the stereotypes and discover what Aboriginal life is like today - from arts and land to sport and spirituality.
Tim Ridgeway's insight:

This page on Aboriginal Housing from Creative Spirits is a fantastic teacher's resource that can be used to develop a unit of work based on many aspects of resource systems including systems for producing goods and services, basic needs and wants and the impact of a lifestyle of the environment (BOS, 2006).

 

This resource outlines and explains the history of Aboriginal housing, Indigenous words for 'house', myths surrounding Aboriginal people and housing, as well as many facts and statistics from across Australia.

 

When using the Aboriginal Education K-12 Resource Guide (2003) as a tool to assist in the selection of appropriate material, this resource is relevant in several ways. The information is up-to-date (last updated December 2013) and provides accurate statistics. The website creator has hands-on experience with Aboriginal people throughout their travels in Australia, and furthermore acknowledges Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples as the traditional custodians of the land. The website has also been endorsed and recommended by many indigenous Australians, showing their approval of the content displayed.

 

For a Stage 1 class, the teacher can use this resource to develop activities based upon the materials from which Aboriginal housing was made from in the past, and contrasting this with the many ways Aboriginal people live today. Furthermore, students can explore the different types of structures built and their cultural significance. For example, special structures were made for the service of religious practice. Another activity students could partake in would include how Aboriginal people gathered the resources to build these structures, and the process by which they were built.These sorts of activities would be very meaningful in the classroom as they provide an insight into Australian history, as well as strongly linking with the global resource (Mud Bricks in Rwanda) through contrasting different cultures throughout the world.

 

The resource also provides opportunities for students to engage in cross-curricular content, as students will be able to learn and explore the many Aboriginal words that can be used to describe a house, including 'wurley', 'nganu' and 'mia-mia'. Using outcome EN1-2A (planning and composing texts) of the English K-10 Syllabus (2012), students could write a sentence incorporating an Aboriginal word for 'house'. The written aspect of this exercise allows the teacher to employ formal assessment strategies to evaluate student learning.

 

References:

BOS. (2012). NSW Syllabus for the Australian Curriculum:  English K-10 Syllabus. Retrieved 6 April, 2014 from http://syllabus.bos.nsw.edu.au/download/

 

DET. (2003). Aboriginal Education K-12 Resource Guide. Retrieved 6 April, 2014 from http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/schoollibraries/assets/pdf/aboriginalresourceguide.pdf

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