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The Future is Data

The Future is Data | SSH Big Data | Scoop.it

At a time when journalism is undergoing a profound crisis as a result of the rise of social networks, financing difficulties, and increasing layoffs in the media industry, the 1st Data Journalism Conference organised by the Spanish chapter of the Open Knowledge Foundation opened up a new direction for the profession; a future that paradoxically goes back to its origins: to the search for new sources, to objective accounts of events and to data analysis.


Via Pierre Tran
Chad Gaffield's insight:

also could help increase sophistication in big data analysis...

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luiy's curator insight, July 8, 2013 4:32 AM

Mar Cabra, an investigative journalist specialising in data journalism and a member of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ), began her presentation by quoting The Guardian’s motto: “Facts are sacred”. And indeed, there is no room for opinion in data journalism, which simply consists of the facts and the objective information that can be extracted from the data. Cabra mentioned three examples of organisations that work with data – Sunlight Foundation, MySociety and Civio Citizen Foundation – and discussed several examples of journalistic stories put together using data, including:

Tu tasa de paro: “your unemployment rate”, a website that analyses Spain’s official unemployment figures released by the National Institute of Statistics, and calculates the unemployment rate for the profile entered by the user. The idea was inspired by a similar project developed in New York.España en llamas: “Spain in flames”, based on data from the Ministry of Agriculture, this map show all the fires recorded in Spain between 2001 and 2010. A project developed by Civio with the help of crowdfunding.How riot rumours spread on Twitter: a remarkable graphic analysis produced by The Guardian, which shows how a rumour is born and dies. This example studies the rumours spread through Twitter during the 2011 London riots.Dollars for docs: a project by ProPublica, a US-based data journalists association, which analyses the money that pharmaceutical companies give to general practitioners. Essential information that can shed light on why a doctor prescribes a particular drug, what pharmaceutical companies give doctors the most money, and so on.WhoKnowsWho: a project by British TV’s Channel 4 that shows the connections between people in positions of power and reveals the relationships between them.Qué hacen los diputados: a project – that continues to seek funds through crowdfunding – which allows users to keep tabs on what Catalan MPs do in Parliament: what they vote, the proposals they make, and so on.

Mar Cabra (whose presentation, in Spanish, is available here) raised the need for collaboration between journalists and programmers – an observation that would keep coming up throughout the conference. Journalists need somebody to help them tell their story graphically and to analyse the data, and programmers need somebody to find the story hidden among all that data. So how is the data obtained in the first place? Some clues can be found in blogs such as The Guardian Datablog, La Nación Data Blog, Information is beautiful, (Re)Structuring Journalism, Between the spreadsheets and Spreadsheet Journalism.

Una Sinnott's curator insight, July 9, 2013 2:34 AM

An interesting look at the current state of data journalism.

Fàtima Galan's curator insight, July 16, 2013 1:31 AM

Great summary about the speakers talk given on the 1st Data Journalism Conference by Mar Cabra, Eva Belmonte, John Burn-Murdoch and Manuel Aristarán.
Through the data analysis today we can speak about Data Journalism, Smart Cities, Open Government. The use and exploitation of any data source, proprietary or external (Open Data or not), shows a change that allows processes for understand what happens and the development of others oriented to the business. The companies are the main interested on the acquisition and exploitation of this data to gain competitive advantage. But they aren’t the only ones able to use this data. Users can also maximize the creation and use of information for the creation and development of politics that allows a better management of our resources and benefits for the citizens.

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Citizen science draws amateurs into scientific research | Harvard Magazine Jan-Feb 2014

Citizen science draws amateurs into scientific research | Harvard Magazine Jan-Feb 2014 | SSH Big Data | Scoop.it

"FOLDIT IS PART of a growing trend toward citizen science: enabling ordinary people, often without formal training, to contribute to scientific research in their spare time. The range of involvement varies. Some citizen scientists donate idle time on their home computers for use in solving problems large in scale (the search for intergalactic objects, as in Einstein@home) or small (folding proteins). Other projects encourage participants to contribute small bits of data about themselves or their environments. The Great Sunflower Project, for instance, provides a platform for logging and sharing observations of pollinators like bees and wasps. Still other efforts enlist laypeople to tag and analyze images: Eyewire, for example, a game developed by Sebastian Seung ’86, Ph.D. ’90, a professor of computational neuroscience at MIT, involves participants in mapping neurons in the brain."


Via Howard Rheingold
Chad Gaffield's insight:

The full blossoming of `citizen science` has a long history in the social sciences and humanities that is now becoming much more important thanks to enabling digital technologies. One major example is the ways in which genealogists and academic researchers have collaborated to study demographic change by using sources such as church parish registers to track births, marriages and deaths. The former paper methodology now involves sophisticated digitization, computation and visualization that underpins both academic research and global businesses such as Ancestry. Other examples include public participation in developing museum exhibits and scholarly editions of significant texts.

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Howard Rheingold's curator insight, January 26, 10:58 AM

Citizen science, enabled by inexpensive but highly accurate sensors and the use of digital media and networks to aggregate and qualify citizen-gathered data, is a form of augmented collective intelligence with a potentially rich future. This Harvard Magazine article is a good contemporary summary. For an in-depth look at this potential, I recommend the book Reinventing Discovery.

ghbrett's curator insight, January 28, 8:17 AM

See Howard Rheingold's comments below.

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(Big) data is a game-changer, if you know how to use it

(Big) data is a game-changer, if you know how to use it | SSH Big Data | Scoop.it
Big Data has been a hot topic for several years now. The term was actually coined by META Group already in 2001. Since then Big Data has become almost a sort (#BigData will turn everything into gold, right?
Chad Gaffield's insight:

happily, greater sophistication is becoming evident in discussions about Big Data as we move from revolutionary fervour to an appreciation of the challenges and possibilities of gaining meaningful insights esp about human thought and behaviour.

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The nature of collective intelligence

The nature of collective intelligence | SSH Big Data | Scoop.it

Digital data stem from our own personal and social cognitive processes and thus express them in one way or another. But we still don’t have any scientific tools to make sense of the data flows produced by online creative conversations at the scale of the digital medium as a whole.


Via Ucka Ludovic Ilolo
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Liliane Clavel Pardo's curator insight, June 16, 2013 3:11 AM

J'adore les articles selectionnés par cet internaute...

Erika Harrison's curator insight, July 17, 2013 8:17 PM

Levy on how human communications and digital media create platforms for augmented collective intelligence.

Klaus Meschede's curator insight, July 21, 2013 12:24 PM

Vortrag 2010, immer noch interessant

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Big Data Needs a Big Theory to Go with It: Scientific American

Big Data Needs a Big Theory to Go with It: Scientific American | SSH Big Data | Scoop.it
Just as the industrial age produced the laws of thermodynamics, we need universal laws of complexity to solve our seemingly intractable problems

Via Pierre Levy
Chad Gaffield's insight:

I think Big Data enables interpretation at the level of  `gold nuggets` in the case of humans (rather than Big Theory at the macro level) since specific context makes so much difference. Could any theory fully accommodate the infinite diversity of human interaction with endless contexts?  

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Pierre Levy's curator insight, May 26, 2013 12:19 PM

The trouble is, we don't have a unified, conceptual framework for addressing questions of complexity

Deyanira Sequeira's curator insight, May 26, 2013 1:11 PM

Se necesitan leyes universidad sobre la complejidad para resolver muchos de nuestros problemas, como big data

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Humanities in the digital age

Humanities in the digital age | SSH Big Data | Scoop.it
A panel of experts discussed the study of humanities in the digital age, and how humanists’ skill set is well-suited for careers in this advancing world of technology.

Via Mlik Sahib, Pierre Levy
Chad Gaffield's insight:

the keys for me: comfort with interpreting complexity, engaging diversity, embracing creativity esp with both structured and unstructured text, images and sounds

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Mlik Sahib's curator insight, April 21, 2013 7:50 AM

“The challenge and the opportunity for humanities is how do you quickly analyze all this data?”

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Big Data Brokers: They Know Everything About You and Sell it to the Highest Bidder

Big Data Brokers: They Know Everything About You and Sell it to the Highest Bidder | SSH Big Data | Scoop.it
Data companies are scooping up enormous amounts of information about almost every American. They sell information about whether you're pregnant or divorced or trying to lose weight, about how rich you are and what kinds of cars you have.
Chad Gaffield's insight:

compelling reason to enhance digital literacies!

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Reports & tools - Business modelling and sustainability : JISC

Reports & tools - Business modelling and sustainability : JISC | SSH Big Data | Scoop.it
As organisational budgets tighten and economic uncertainty threatens, many digital projects struggle to develop coping strategies when funding, supporting core operations and/or essential development, is not forthcoming.
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Big Data's Trend in 2013 | Analytics and Visualization of Big Data

Big Data's Trend in 2013. Ideas behind Big Data have been traditional data mining and analytics. But new technology enables the collection and analysis of unimaginable data volumes at high speeds.


Via AnalyticsInnovations
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Disruptions: Data Without Context Tells a Misleading Story

Disruptions: Data Without Context Tells a Misleading Story | SSH Big Data | Scoop.it
According to Google Flu Trends, at the flu season’s peak in mid-January, nearly 11 percent of the United States population had influenza — double the official federal estimates.

Via M. Edward (Ed) Borasky
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Document Mining with Overview: A Digital Tools Tutorial | Poynter's News University

Document Mining with Overview: A Digital Tools Tutorial | Poynter's News University | SSH Big Data | Scoop.it

Via M. Edward (Ed) Borasky
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Doug Hovelson's curator insight, March 13, 2013 11:26 PM

Dig into document mining..

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The Overview Project » Algorithms are not enough: lessons bringing computer science to journalism

The Overview Project » Algorithms are not enough: lessons bringing computer science to journalism | SSH Big Data | Scoop.it

Via M. Edward (Ed) Borasky
Chad Gaffield's insight:

helpful for sure but we also must recognize that, embedded in algorithms, are all the kinds of interpretive judgments that are associated with journalism...are these judgements made explicitly? shared by journalists? etc - my sense is that journalists (like all `users` need to see themselves as partners in all the analytic-interpretive steps)

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Antonio Figueiredo's curator insight, January 18, 1:12 AM

In Data Journalism Algorithms are not Enough

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The Future is Data

The Future is Data | SSH Big Data | Scoop.it

At a time when journalism is undergoing a profound crisis as a result of the rise of social networks, financing difficulties, and increasing layoffs in the media industry, the 1st Data Journalism Conference organised by the Spanish chapter of the Open Knowledge Foundation opened up a new direction for the profession; a future that paradoxically goes back to its origins: to the search for new sources, to objective accounts of events and to data analysis.


Via Pierre Tran
Chad Gaffield's insight:

also could help increase sophistication in big data analysis...

more...
luiy's curator insight, July 8, 2013 4:32 AM

Mar Cabra, an investigative journalist specialising in data journalism and a member of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ), began her presentation by quoting The Guardian’s motto: “Facts are sacred”. And indeed, there is no room for opinion in data journalism, which simply consists of the facts and the objective information that can be extracted from the data. Cabra mentioned three examples of organisations that work with data – Sunlight Foundation, MySociety and Civio Citizen Foundation – and discussed several examples of journalistic stories put together using data, including:

Tu tasa de paro: “your unemployment rate”, a website that analyses Spain’s official unemployment figures released by the National Institute of Statistics, and calculates the unemployment rate for the profile entered by the user. The idea was inspired by a similar project developed in New York.España en llamas: “Spain in flames”, based on data from the Ministry of Agriculture, this map show all the fires recorded in Spain between 2001 and 2010. A project developed by Civio with the help of crowdfunding.How riot rumours spread on Twitter: a remarkable graphic analysis produced by The Guardian, which shows how a rumour is born and dies. This example studies the rumours spread through Twitter during the 2011 London riots.Dollars for docs: a project by ProPublica, a US-based data journalists association, which analyses the money that pharmaceutical companies give to general practitioners. Essential information that can shed light on why a doctor prescribes a particular drug, what pharmaceutical companies give doctors the most money, and so on.WhoKnowsWho: a project by British TV’s Channel 4 that shows the connections between people in positions of power and reveals the relationships between them.Qué hacen los diputados: a project – that continues to seek funds through crowdfunding – which allows users to keep tabs on what Catalan MPs do in Parliament: what they vote, the proposals they make, and so on.

Mar Cabra (whose presentation, in Spanish, is available here) raised the need for collaboration between journalists and programmers – an observation that would keep coming up throughout the conference. Journalists need somebody to help them tell their story graphically and to analyse the data, and programmers need somebody to find the story hidden among all that data. So how is the data obtained in the first place? Some clues can be found in blogs such as The Guardian Datablog, La Nación Data Blog, Information is beautiful, (Re)Structuring Journalism, Between the spreadsheets and Spreadsheet Journalism.

Una Sinnott's curator insight, July 9, 2013 2:34 AM

An interesting look at the current state of data journalism.

Fàtima Galan's curator insight, July 16, 2013 1:31 AM

Great summary about the speakers talk given on the 1st Data Journalism Conference by Mar Cabra, Eva Belmonte, John Burn-Murdoch and Manuel Aristarán.
Through the data analysis today we can speak about Data Journalism, Smart Cities, Open Government. The use and exploitation of any data source, proprietary or external (Open Data or not), shows a change that allows processes for understand what happens and the development of others oriented to the business. The companies are the main interested on the acquisition and exploitation of this data to gain competitive advantage. But they aren’t the only ones able to use this data. Users can also maximize the creation and use of information for the creation and development of politics that allows a better management of our resources and benefits for the citizens.

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Why Big Data Is Not Truth

Why Big Data Is Not Truth | SSH Big Data | Scoop.it
Don’t let the rhetoric fool you, a Microsoft researcher says: Big Data is a human tool, which means it is subject to all kinds of miscollection, misapplication and abuse.

Via Toni Sánchez
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garassini's curator insight, February 22, 5:53 AM

Una riflessione molto interessante su alcuni "miti" che riguardano i big data: in primo luogo il fatto che i dati siano oggettivi e neutrali. 

 

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Opinion mining - Sentiment analysis (en français)


Via Pierre Levy
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luiy's curator insight, May 3, 2013 11:16 AM

Ces agrégats de tweets réalisés pendant la campagne électorale permettent de visualiser les sentiments extraits des tweets, ( ce qui ne veut rien dire mais ça marche encore). Mais pour rendre la chose séduisante, il suffit de les géolocaliser avec une heat map du plus joli effet. Que se passe-t-il alors pour tout esprit normalement constitué? Nous cherchons à trouver du sens, alors qu’il n’y en a pas. Notre attention a été captée et cela suffit. Je disais dans une conférence sur les conversations que la plupart des analyses de sentiment relevait des méthodes des augures et des haruspices, nous y voilà.Nous observons le vol des sentiments sur des cartes de chaleur. 

Sidnei Campos Pinto's comment, May 6, 2013 9:05 AM
Alphabétisation numérique et éducation aux médias de mes collègues enseignants.

Ma pratique en apprentissage dans des espaces éducatifs formels et surtout en non-formelle, me conduit à remarquer un changement dans l'apparence de la communication sur la médiation technologique dans ces espaces éducatifs. Dans le domaine de l'apprentissage et le domaine de l'éducation à la citoyenneté.
Il ya des débats houleux entre les éducateurs dans le domaine de l'apprentissage, ces derniers temps, à partir de perspectives différentes. Lorsque l'apprentissage est analysé, seulement du point de vue éducatif, on peut être induit en erreur en leur faisant croire que les nouvelles technologies représentent une panacée, selon les mots du prof dr. Ismar Lapin, qui serait responsable de changements significatifs dans le domaine de l'éducation. Le même professeur Ismar, souligne que Pierre Levy préfère situer l'apprentissage dans le cadre d'une «écologie cognitive», pleine de significations et de valeurs symboliques qui nourrit la société psychique et culturel contemporain.
Ce changement important m'amène à la relance d'un appel d'éducateurs, communicateurs, les ingénieurs et les gestionnaires de l'information de penser, de rassembler et d'évaluer l'introduction de nouvelles technologies dans l'éducation, se demandant en permanence par modèle de communication qui sous-tend le système éducatif spécifique . C'est ce qu'on appelle une information de gestion et de communication dans les espaces éducatifs. Ce projet comprend l'enseignement à distance EAD, l'éducation pour les médias, l'éducation et les médias, et l'éducation non formelle très. Dans tous ces systèmes est le même: l'apprentissage se fait en ce que l'individu se sent touché impliqué connecté. Ainsi, l'environnement induite par la technologie peut aider à produire des sens, devenant dans les médiations.

Analyser une sensation produite par cette expérience que le sauvetage de ma délicatesse perdu. «Transformer personnes dans plus de personnes», comme Paulo Freire.
Pierre Levy's comment, May 6, 2013 11:08 AM
:-)
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Big Data, Open Data and Official Statistics | StatsBlogs.com | Statistics Blogs @ StatsBlogs.com

Big Data, Open Data and Official Statistics | StatsBlogs.com | Statistics Blogs @ StatsBlogs.com | SSH Big Data | Scoop.it
Big Data, Open Data and Official Statistics http://t.co/Idf7zyIj45
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Jacek Bugajski's curator insight, April 22, 2013 12:24 PM

Big Data, Open Data and Official Statistics ... 

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Predicting the Future By Mining Online News and Other Web Data | MIT Technology Review

Predicting the Future By Mining Online News and Other Web Data | MIT Technology Review | SSH Big Data | Scoop.it
Prototype software can give early warnings of disease or violence outbreaks by spotting clues in news reports.

Via Pierre Levy
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Theoreti.ca » Blog Archive » Big Buzz about Big Data: Does it really have to be analyzed.

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'Big Data' now a big deal at business schools - SmartPlanet.com (blog)

'Big Data' now a big deal at business schools - SmartPlanet.com (blog) | SSH Big Data | Scoop.it

'Big Data' now a big deal at business schools SmartPlanet.com (blog) As Asha Omelian and Cory Weinberg of GWU's The Harchet report, the proposed program “will include courses like data mining and social network analytics aimed at mid-career...


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Population Distribution of USA | The Big Picture

Fascinating graphic showing the distribution of population in the US:     Click to enlarge Source: Visual Economics

Via M. Edward (Ed) Borasky
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Big Data in Human Resources: Talent Analytics Comes of Age - Forbes

Big Data in Human Resources: Talent Analytics Comes of Age - Forbes | SSH Big Data | Scoop.it
Gartner expects the market for BigData and analytics to generate $3.7 Trillion in products and services and generate 4.4 million new jobs by 2015.

Via Pierre Levy
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Diego Gerardo Yáñez Segura's curator insight, April 16, 2013 10:03 AM

Hoy en día la mayoría el monto promedio que gasta una empresa en la nómina es alrededor del 40% de los ingresos, y las empresas centran la selección del mejor empleado para un puesto a través de corazonadas y en base a la experiencia.

 

Este artículo me pareció de gran interés, debido a que nos habla del lanzamiento futuro de un software que le ayudará a las empresas a tomar una mejor decisión en el proceso de contratación. Dicho software se espera que evalué una serie de características de los candidatos para medir el porcentaje de éxito posible que tendrá cada uno y así poder elegir al mejor calificado según el programa.

 

Algunos de los datos que se podrá tomar en cuenta son: aspectos demográficos, información de desempeño, historia de la educación, lugar de trabajo, y muchos otros factores sobre nuestros empleados.

 

Si esto llegará a ser posible, las empresas podrían aplicar la ciencia a la mejora de la selección, gestión y alineación del personal, con lo que pudieran generar ganancias inimaginables, debido a la productividad del empleado seleccionado y al eliminar gastos recurrentes destinados al proceso de contratación.