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Convert Your Videos in the Cloud Raidly and Cost-Effectively with the Amazon Elastic Transcoder

Convert Your Videos in the Cloud Raidly and Cost-Effectively with the Amazon Elastic Transcoder | SrcC | Scoop.it
Amazon Elastic Transcoder is an easy to use, highly scalable service for converting video files between different digital formats.

Via Robin Good
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Robin Good's curator insight, January 29, 2013 8:03 AM



The Amazon Elastic Transcoder (http://aws.amazon.com/elastictranscoder), is a new web-based service that makes it easy to convert video clips between different file formats without needing to buy and install any dedicated software.


The service is designed to be very easy to use and you pay for what you use. 20 minutes of free transcoding, are available to all users each month.

(See: http://aws.amazon.com/free)


Video file formats supported: 3GP, AAC, AVI, FLV, MP4 and MPEG-2 as input and H.264/AAC/MP4 as output file formats.


Prices start at just $0.015/minute for Standard Definition content, and $0.030/minute for High Definition content.


Pricing Examples

  1. A 10 minute source file in US West (Oregon) transcoded to an SD output will cost 10 x $0.015 = $0.15.
  2. A 10 minute source file in US East (N. Virginia) transcoded to an HD output will cost 10 x $0.030 = $0.30.
  3. A 10 minute source file in EU (Ireland) transcoded to one SD and one HD output will cost (10 x $0.017) + (10 x $0.034) = $0.51.


FAQ: http://aws.amazon.com/elastictranscoder/faqs/


Pricing info: http://aws.amazon.com/elastictranscoder/pricing/


Find out more: http://aws.amazon.com/elastictranscoder/



Valery's curator insight, January 30, 2013 3:56 AM

The video war in the cloud has started today !

 

Prices are not that low (especially if you include every hidden costs) but as a start and IF the quality is there, I know many suppliers that won't get champagne today.

 

Rescooped by Ondra Mayer from Video Breakthroughs
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Microsoft Azure Media Services – How to encode in the Azure Cloud – Part 2

After the first post which give an overview and explain how set-up a WAMS environment, I continue the discovery of WAMS World (sorry for the pun ). In this post, we will see how we can transform a video from a input format to another format. It’s possible to generate multiple output format or to encrypt the video. But we will see it in a next posts.


First of all, we need to understand the different terms we will use in WAMS. In my example, I want to obtain this workflow :
1. create an asset : an asset is an entity which contains all informations on the video (metadata, …)
2. upload a file in blob storage and associate to the asset
3. apply a job on the asset. A job is composed by one or more tasks. A task is an action : eg: encoding with protection. To run the task, we use a MediaProcessor.
4. after the job completed, deliver the video via the Azure CDN.


Via Nicolas Weil
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Rescooped by Ondra Mayer from Encoding video
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Transcoding Best Practices: Mezzanine Formats

Transcoding Best Practices: Mezzanine Formats | SrcC | Scoop.it

First things first – What is a Mezzanine format? A mezzanine format is a mid-rez working copy of your video asset which is of sufficient quality to generate your highest output, but small enough to move around, archive, and work with. The goal is to free up resources once all major edits and processing are completed. The source of your mezzanine format can come from many places. When encoding from a tape with a fully completed asset, the encode can be the mezzanine file. When exporting from a non-linear editor such as Final Cut or Avid, the format chosen as the output can be a mezzanine. The point is, all major editing and processing is completed in the highest format available and this smaller asset can take it from here.


Via Nicolas Weil, Olivier NOEL
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Akash Tyagi's curator insight, February 5, 2014 3:55 AM
This is a very interesting piece of information for all Digital Media enthusiasts trying to get their basics right.