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Literacy Is Foundation of Learning - The Ledger

Literacy Is Foundation of Learning - The Ledger | Squirrelly Teacher | Scoop.it
Literacy Is Foundation of Learning
The Ledger
Yes, because the majority are probably not learning to read, write and understand math, science and social studies as well as those students in Polk's A, B and C schools.
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The Teaching with Primary Sources Journal- Teaching with Primary Sources | Teacher Resources - Library of Congress

The Teaching with Primary Sources Journal- Teaching with Primary Sources | Teacher Resources - Library of Congress | Squirrelly Teacher | Scoop.it
Teaching with Primary Sources Quarterly, is a publication for teachers focusing on pedagogical approaches to teaching.
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Why the Learning Organization Is the Ultimate Competitive Advantage

Why the Learning Organization Is the Ultimate Competitive Advantage | Squirrelly Teacher | Scoop.it
Read why the learning organization is the ultimate competitive advantage and how technology amplifies the learning organization.
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Rescooped by Karen Chichester from Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
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20 Literary Facts To Impress Your Friends With

20 Literary Facts To Impress Your Friends With | Squirrelly Teacher | Scoop.it
Aside from scoring book nerd points, these will also help you dominate on trivia night!

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
Karen Chichester's insight:

Very interesting information. Complete with different backstories. 

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, April 20, 2013 2:15 PM

I don't know about you but I like these kinds of articles. As an English major and an English teacher for nearly four decades, I'm always pleasantly amused at the discovery of "new" back stories particularly about books I've taught repeatedly.

 

I don't know how many times I did dramatic readings of the entire Of Mice and Men complete with theatre style lighting in my classroom, dressed as a teacher sort of (denim jeans and shirt with tie and jacket... you know the look) and then as I began to read the story aloud I'd casually remove my jacket. A few minutes later I'd remove my tie, followed a few minutes later by rolling up my sleeves and then in subsequent several minutes gaps, I'd pull out a red bandana, wipe my brow and tie it around my neck. Another gap and I'd pull out my old cap just like the one I'd seen George wearing if one of the films. And then I'd hit the projector switch that was set to show a slide of the Salinas valley on the white board behind me.

 

Okay, I was really into it, and within a single class period the kids were locked into a genuine suspension of disbelief and they wanted to know what was going to happen next.

 

So when I saw the trivia point about Of Mice and Men in this article, I had to smile since Of Mice and Men was one of the several books that I had dug deeper into than any of the books I taught over the years.

 

I had no idea about the trivia regarding Don Quixote or Roald Dahl, a writer who I truly like but had no idea regarding the trivia  mentioned here.

 

This is also the kind of "back story" stuff that I found many students intrigued by as well. It's not quite the same as the historical background stuff we also share. There's something about the "did you know?" impact of author and book back story that has a different engagement factor for kids than the traditional academic back story stuff.

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

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Are you as well-read as a 10th grader? Take our quiz. - "The Odyssey," by Homer - CSMonitor.com

Are you as well-read as a 10th grader? Take our quiz. - "The Odyssey," by Homer - CSMonitor.com | Squirrelly Teacher | Scoop.it
States all across America are adopting standards for what high school freshman and sophomores should be reading. Take this quiz to see how well you know the titles now appearing on many public US high school reading lists.

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, April 28, 2013 9:56 AM

Take this quiz FIRST (really)

 

and then watch this video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gokm9RUr4ME

 

and then ask yourself, "What's the problem?"

 

And then take just a moment to leave a comment below. 

 

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

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SortFix - Improve your Search

SortFix - Improve your Search | Squirrelly Teacher | Scoop.it
SortFix is the best way to search the Web, makes Google and Yahoo search easy and fun and also improves the results.

Via Erin Klein
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Rescooped by Karen Chichester from Digital Literacies and Learning
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Digital Differentiation ~ Cool Tools for 21st Century Learners

Digital Differentiation ~ Cool Tools for 21st Century Learners | Squirrelly Teacher | Scoop.it

Use multi-media to design student-driven learning experiences that are fueled by standards-based Essential Questions and facilitated by digital tools to provide students with flexible learning paths.

 

Technology is a tool that can be used to help teachers facilitate learning experiences that address the diverse learning needs of all students and help them develop 21st Century Skills. At it's most basic level, digital tools can be used to help students find, understand and use information. When combined with student-driven learning experiences fueled by Essential Questions offering flexible learning paths, it can be the ticket to success. Here is a closer look at three components of effectively using technology as a tool for digital differentiation

...


Via Steve dembo, Ana Rodera, evangelina chavez, Lindy J
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Learning to Read the Core: A View from 30,000 Feet

Learning to Read the Core: A View from 30,000 Feet | Squirrelly Teacher | Scoop.it
Want to learn how to read the Common Core State Standards? Teaching Channel will help you. Here’s a video with a great presentation giving you the tools needed to read the Common Core and begin implementing the Core in your classroom.
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The best Prezi presentation ever!

When the CEO's presentation is approaching or a company's event is occurring, and if you think power point is boring... Take a look at our Prezi presentation...

Via Eric Van Camp
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Margje Van Der Lei's curator insight, October 10, 2013 3:50 AM

Leuk om ideeën te krijgen en te creëren.

Bronwyn Desjardins's curator insight, October 31, 2013 3:43 PM

Great example of what Prezi can do.

Ian Korman's curator insight, February 3, 3:19 AM

Prezi isn't new but it is still pretty innovative. I recommend using just to stick out from the PowerPoint crowd. You will really stick out if you use it as creatively as they did in this video.

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Using Universal Design for Learning: Successful Transition Models for Educators Working with Youth with Learning Disabilities | NCWD/Youth

Using Universal Design for Learning: Successful Transition Models for Educators Working with Youth with Learning Disabilities | NCWD/Youth | Squirrelly Teacher | Scoop.it
Using Universal Design for Learning: Successful Transition Models for Educators Working with Youth | NCWD/Youth http://t.co/iYCyldV922
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Affirm Your Life: LEARNING Quotations

Affirm Your Life: LEARNING Quotations | Squirrelly Teacher | Scoop.it
Sometimes questions are more important than answers. - Nancy Willard. More LEARNING Quotes http://t.co/ulPcvjxhlO #quote
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Your Children Need a Néw Brain for Common Core

Your Children Need a Néw Brain for Common Core | Squirrelly Teacher | Scoop.it
Oh, dear, success on the Common Core requires more than anyone knew. It is not enough to be able to read and do math. What is needed, this article says, is a whole new brain. I feel sure that my ol...
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Rescooped by Karen Chichester from Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
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Six Full Songs from The Great Gatsby Soundtrack

Six Full Songs from The Great Gatsby Soundtrack | Squirrelly Teacher | Scoop.it
The only thing that may be more anticipated than The Great Gatsby movie is the soundtrack, executively produced by Jay Z. The soundtrack includes music by The xx, Florence + the Machine and Andre

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, April 27, 2013 10:57 AM

Love Gatsby?

Just found this site that might make a great bridge between your students' interest in contemporary music and your interest in teaching Gatsby.

Here's a list of some of the contemporary musicians on the soundtrack just in case you want to check them out so you can reference them in class discussions.

 

I'm just wondering how kids might welcome a teacher's modeling the kind of interest in learning more about what his or her students care about that the teacher hopes his or her students might have or develop in learning more about what literature teachers care about.

 

The soundtrack is executively produced by Jay Z.

The xx

Florence and the Machine

André 3000

Lana Del Rey

Will.i.am

Fergie

Q-Tip

Goonrock

Nero

 

By the way, there's no doubt that these artists and their fans will be abuzz on the artist's official websites, Facebook pages, and on Twitter specifically about their work on The Great Gatsby project. Seems like a ripe opportunity to let students incorporate their interest in any of the artists into a personalized learning experience while reading Gatsby.

 

 

Something to think about...

I can't help recalling the reactions by various English teacher friends of mind when DeCaprio's Romeo and Juliet came out. Many loved it; many did not.

 

In either case, whether Romeo and Juliet was or Gatsby is great adaptation or not, keep in mind that if it engages your students in an receptiveness to the story, encourage the receptiveness. Treat it like the carrot dangled in front of the otherwise reluctant horse's nose.

 

By the way, one of my favorite post reading a book and a subsequent film-viewing activities was a brain storming activity built around the following questions...

 

1. What did the film maker leave out of the film that YOU think was really important in the book?

 

2. What did the film maker put in the film that the author might have liked even though it wasn't in the book?

 

3. Which character in the film do YOU think did the best / worst job of portraying the original character?

 

Students who could list important scenes left out of the movie were pretty pround of their knowledge and discovered their own reasons to critique the film.

 

Students who could list scenes added to the film that the author might like anyway, were pretty proud of their "seeing" the connection  between the scene and their understanding of the author's themes.

 

Students who could list reasons why a particular character was well or not so well represented, were pretty proud of their understanding of a character's motives and purpose for being in the original story.

 

The point being, that the students were always welcome to like or dislike the film, but they got the opportunity to express their opinion in a way that let them enthusiastically show what they knew about the author's intentions.

 

And, yes, it works with film adaptations we love like To Kill A Mockingbird that pretty much left out the importance of Miss Maudie and Aunt Alexandra. And, it works with the worst of adaptations like the most recent adaptation of Animal Farm that put a happy ending on the movie and with the children's book Cloudy with Meatballs that never really did get around to having much to do with the original story.

 

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

 

 

IS's curator insight, April 30, 2013 2:33 PM

I cannot wait for this film - hopefully it will do the tale of corruption, disillusionment, dreams, glamour and  squandered love justice.  Fingers crossed - Baz hasn't let me down yet!

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The Great Gatsby - Movie Trailer, Photos, Synopsis

The Great Gatsby - Movie Trailer, Photos, Synopsis | Squirrelly Teacher | Scoop.it
In theaters May 10. From Baz Luhrmann, the director of Romeo + Juliet and Moulin Rouge, “The Great Gatsby” stars Leonardo DiCaprio, Tobey Maguire, Carey Mulligan, Joel Edgerton and Isla Fisher.

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, April 27, 2013 11:41 AM

There's always great potential for the creative English teacher on a film adaptation's official website. Many offer resources they think might be valuable for teachers. 

 

Though what they offer may or may not seem adequate on the surface, what they offer in the eyes of the creative English teacher can be adapted to levels well beyond merely adequate.

 

As I perused the Gatsby movie official site I noticed several opportunities to build engaging bridges between the contemporary adaptation, the student's contemporary interests, and the original story.

 

For example, under the GUIDE TO STYLE link, though the first view is just a bunch of images of fashion logos, clicking on each logo takes you to great info on the role of style, or a bit of the history of the brand, or a short film clip followed by behind the scenes interviews with the costume designer.

 

You know that your students are either openly fashionistas, or sub-counsciously tuned into the clothing trends they choose to follow. Maybe, a parallel project based upon the design of this portion of the website but based upon the various campus groups would be interesting. Or perhaps paralleling the concept here with the fashions of Cyrano or The Crucible or a favorite musical group or the characters on The Big Bang TV show, or they way people dressed in their parents' high school year books or... well, you get the idea.

 

_____

 

Be sure to note that when you click on one of the main menu links that there may be a sub menu.

 

For example, under the ABOUT THE FILM link, the synopsis is pretty minimal. But, if you click on the PRODUCTION NOTES sub link, you'll find a 49 page document. And, it's actually a PDF file so under the FILE menu of your internet browser you should be able to actually save the entire document to your hard drive.

_____

Under the SOUNDTRACK link there are audio samples from the film. But rather than using contemporary music, all the film's music was done by contemporary musicians. 

 

Why not consider giving  students an opportunity to see if any of their favorite comtemprary artists is on the list and then explore the relationship between what they already know about the artist and the artist's decision to be a part of this adaptation of a classic?

 

Or perhaps, they might feel intrigued by creating a "soundtrack" for a  film entitled "The Great (their name here)."  I'd add a little spice by telling them that the production company only had a couple of requests for budgetary and production purposes. 

 

1. For marketing purposes they had to have exactly 12 songs. no more no less.

2. The total play time had to be less than 1 hour so it would fit on a CD.

 

_____

Be sure to notice that the main menu links seem to run right off the screen on the right. Clicking the right arrow icon takes you to a few more interesting pages.

 

One is a page of downloadable images that might be useful in all sorts of projects.

 

But, don't overlook the MONOGRAM MAKER link. Here students can actually design a personalized monogram with their initials, their choice of background shape for the monogram, and  then actually create stationery that they can add a message to and send via email or use on a variety of social media posts.

 

What other creative bridges might be built by you OR by your students?

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Rescooped by Karen Chichester from Digital Literacies and Learning
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SIDI 2012 - Real Reasons to Write: Engaging and Motivating Student Writers

SIDI 2012 - Real Reasons to Write: Engaging and Motivating Student Writers | Squirrelly Teacher | Scoop.it

a presentation by the thoughtful Sara Kajder


Via KevinHodgson, Lindy J
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AdviceToWriters - Advice to Writers - The Best Writing Advice

AdviceToWriters - Advice to Writers - The Best Writing Advice | Squirrelly Teacher | Scoop.it
The best advice on writing I’ve ever received was from Dwight Macdonald: “Ever...
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The 25 best reads on the web this year

The 25 best reads on the web this year | Squirrelly Teacher | Scoop.it
Each week here at The Verge, we round up some of the best writing around the web, highlighting the stories, profiles, interviews, and ind-depth reporting that rise above the daily churn. And, like l...
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