Spotify and Other Streaming Services
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Digital Music News - Three Reasons Why SoundCloud *Is* Helping Artist Careers...

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Martin Stobby's comment, July 15, 2013 8:45 PM
Even though Soundcloud doesn't pay money, the exposure is good and it allows you to post "Buy" links to your music.
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Spotify responds to Thom Yorke and Nigel Godrich criticism

Spotify responds to Thom Yorke and Nigel Godrich criticism | Spotify and Other Streaming Services | Scoop.it
"We're 100% committed to making Spotify the most artist-friendly music service"

Via midem
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Martin Stobby's comment, July 15, 2013 8:48 PM
Spotify is working on a project to make their system more artist-friendly.
Josh Jenkins's curator insight, September 9, 2013 12:02 PM

Spotify is defending their criticism claiming that their goal is to make a music freindly enviorment where fans can connect with the artist. They also mention that they discuss with artist how they can help their careers and sales.

 

 

However, Godrich criticizes them saying the Spotify was not paying new artists a fair amount. He says that the industry is being taken over by backdoors, and that spotify only benefits superstars with 10 years of EMI investment not the new artists.

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Thom Yorke pulls music from Spotify and Rdio, calls them unfair to new artists

Thom Yorke pulls music from Spotify and Rdio, calls them unfair to new artists | Spotify and Other Streaming Services | Scoop.it
Radiohead frontman Thom Yorke has never been shy about voicing his opinions on digital media, but now he's taken things a step further: he's pulled his various side projects off streaming music...

Via Joanna KIRK
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Atoms for Peace quit Spotify: ‘It’s bad for new music’

Atoms for Peace quit Spotify: ‘It’s bad for new music’ | Spotify and Other Streaming Services | Scoop.it
After a good few months for Spotify in terms of winning over streaming-music holdouts – Pink Floyd and The Eagles most notably – the com

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Martin Stobby's comment, July 15, 2013 8:32 PM
Streaming is good for established music, but not for new releases.
Josh Jenkins's curator insight, September 9, 2013 1:06 PM

Artists such as Atomas for peace, Pink Floyd, and the Eagles have taken their albums off of Spotify. claiming that its bad for new artists.

Tony Miranda's curator insight, October 11, 2013 9:30 PM

I thought this article was interesting.  I do somewhat agree that the fact artists do not get paid enough through Spotify with the amount of streams being played from a musician stand point. But streaming is the way of the future, and once other companies start utilizing and creating better streaming services then the artists can be getting paid justly for their work. 

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Digital Music News - Three Reasons Why SoundCloud Isn't Helping Artist Careers...

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Martin Stobby's comment, July 15, 2013 8:46 PM
So much music is uploaded to Soundcloud that it becomes difficult to find new music.
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Pandora Vs. Artist Royalties

Internet music streaming service Pandora currently pays 50% of their gross revenue in royalty payments to artists. But they're lobbying congress to allow the...
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Martin Stobby's comment, July 15, 2013 8:43 PM
Spotify has a good business model that pays better than Pandora.
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Not OK, Computer... Thom Yorke pulls plug on Spotify

Not OK, Computer... Thom Yorke pulls plug on Spotify | Spotify and Other Streaming Services | Scoop.it
RADIOHEAD frontman slams the free streaming app because he reckons it doesn’t support breaking new artists

Via David Simpson
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Martin Stobby's comment, July 15, 2013 8:27 PM
Some will argue that Spotify doesn't help new artists because although it may give them exposure, the amount of revenue it provides is not worth it. Advocates of Spotify believe that the service is a great alternative to systems like Soundcloud which will not pay royalties.
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Alan Krueger on how the music industry explains inequality | WonkBlog | Wash Post

Alan Krueger on how the music industry explains inequality | WonkBlog | Wash Post | Spotify and Other Streaming Services | Scoop.it

 

It is exceedingly rare for a White House chief economist to give a speech on rock-and-roll. But Alan Krueger is scheduled to do just that Wednesday evening at the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland. His talk there (a text was made available in advance) is a terrific window into how the music business explains the forces shaping our collective economic fortunes.

 

“The music industry is a microcosm of what is happening in the U.S. economy at large,” Krueger, chairman of the White House Council of Economic Advisers, says. “We are increasingly becoming a ‘winner-take-all economy,’ a phenomenon that the music industry has long experienced. Over recent decades, technological change, globalization and an erosion of the institutions and practices that support shared prosperity in the U.S. have put the middle class under increasing stress. The lucky and the talented – and it is often hard to tell the difference – have been doing better and better, while the vast majority has struggled to keep up.”

 

So how does this show up in the music industry?

 

More and more of the revenue from concerts, Krueger shows, is going to bands at the tippy-top of the scale of popularity. Since 1982, the top 1 percent of performers have gone from earning 26 percent of concert revenue to 56 percent!

 

But how does technology drive that? Krueger works through the process. A century ago, a musical performer could only reach as many people as his or her vocal range and travel schedule would allow. Now, high-quality recordings can be distributed to billions with the flip of a switch. The result: Everybody has access to the very best music, or at least the music that most precisely suits their tastes. The megastars who create that music are wildly popular and can make a fortune. But it means things are pretty hard out there for a mid-tier band just trying to build a loyal fanbase.

 

That’s too bad if you’re an aspiring musician – it means only the most appealing bands in the world will be able to make a good living performing. But might it at least mean  that we as consumers are getting the music that brings us the most joy possible? The music industry is a meritocracy where the very best songs, and artists, rise to the top, right?

 

Well, not so much.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Martin Stobby's comment, July 15, 2013 8:30 PM
According to this study, the perception of popularity is more important than the quality of the music.
Kimberly Bernardo's curator insight, February 12, 4:02 PM

This article gives insight to the perceived popularity of songs and artists. With research from sociologists, this article demonstrates how a song or artist's success can be linked to how popular they appear. The more popular the more likely the song is to be downloaded. However, their research suggests that it is not necessarily the very best songs or artists.