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WFYI Indianapolis - Naptown to Super City

WFYI Indianapolis - Naptown to Super City | Sports: The Cultural & Economic Impact on Cities | Scoop.it

Sports franchise create "big league towns" and places of destination. Maybe it's a good thing the Colts left Baltimore.

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As Games Play On, London Quieter Than Expected

Just a few weeks ago, warnings were flying thick and fast that the Olympic Games would reduce London to chaos, jamming the capital's roads and clogging up its aging transport system.

 

The Olympic Games have had a very uneven impact on the various neighborhoods of London. Many businesses that cater to tourists on the western end of London have not seen the typical crowds for a regular summer, much less a summer that was so highly anticipated.  The majority of the neighborhood renovation projects were carried out on the East End.  So the question: "are the Olympics an economic success for London?" is not one with a simple, straightforward answer.   


Via Seth Dixon
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Kurkjian: Camden Yards turns 20

Kurkjian: Camden Yards turns 20 | Sports: The Cultural & Economic Impact on Cities | Scoop.it
Opened April 6, 1992, Oriole Park at Camden Yards remains the standard by which all new ballparks are measured.

 

After the Colts left Baltimore there was only one team left, The Orioles. The owner of the Orioles in the lates 1980s was some hot shot lawyer from Washington D.C, who stated he would NOT move the team. However, what he wanted was a new ball park for his Orioles. After just losing the Colts to Indy the city of Baltimore and the Govenor of Maryland decided that in order to make sure the Orioles stay a new stadium was to be constructed. The plan worked, not accordingly but what plans ever do? As a result the Orioles received not just a new home in Camden Yards, but one of the most beautiful ball parks in the game. 

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Red State Hoops: The Oklahoma City Thunder and the value of Seattle's rage

Red State Hoops: The Oklahoma City Thunder and the value of Seattle's rage | Sports: The Cultural & Economic Impact on Cities | Scoop.it

Despite being promoted as a team to love by the NBA the Thunder are not well liked back in Seattle. Will the Sonics ever go back to Seattle? Who knows, but the reason they left is because they took a stand against the NBA and the billionaire owners by not allowing the construction of a new $300 Million dollar arena. Sounds similar to what happened with the Baltimore Colts in 1984. Baltimore ended up getting the Ravens a few years later....hold on Seattle.

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What March Madness Can Teach Us About the Economic Geography of Sports

What March Madness Can Teach Us About the Economic Geography of Sports | Sports: The Cultural & Economic Impact on Cities | Scoop.it
The Atlantic CitiesWhat March Madness Can Teach Us About the Economic Geography of SportsThe Atlantic CitiesWhat exactly can account for the dominance of small and medium sized metros generally and college towns in particular in the economic...

 

While it is clear that superstar athletes in the professional ranks are concentrated in the largest cities, college athletics still let's the 'Davids' compete with the 'Goliaths.'  Interestingly, the largest cities don't have the highest per capita concentration of athletes but many small college towns do.  Among the Top 25 cities with the highest concentration of athletes in the workforce (include scholarship athletes) we find South Bend, Indiana, home to Notre Dame; Auburn, Alabama, home to the university that bears its name; Ames, Iowa, home of Iowa State; Blacksburg, Virginia (Virginia Tech); Burlington, Vermont (University of Vermont); and Boulder, Colorado (University of Colorado).  

 

Goes to show that you don't have to be a big city to win big. It also shows that college teams as well as professional sport franchises to have a large impact on their local communities.


Via Seth Dixon
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Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 19, 2013 6:47 AM

This article shows us the comparisons between  economic geography and sports. This article focuses on basketball and the March Madness Tournament. By seeing which teams when based on their conference (where the college is located in region) you can see why certain teams do so well and why athletes want to go to that college.

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"Stadium Mania puts Cities over a Barrel

"Stadium Mania puts Cities over a Barrel | Sports: The Cultural & Economic Impact on Cities | Scoop.it

The author of this article looks at the construction of a $180 million dollar sports arena in Washington, D.C. as well as others built in Detroit, Seattle, and Baltimore. In the article he looks at the impact of the project on cities’ construction of stadiums. He also looks at the differences in the perceptions on the economic value of sports teams. It really appears as though these mega staidums that are built with the public's money aren't worth it. There is too little "bang for the buck" and in many instances cost the city money it'll never get back. But yet the construction of these stadiums create hundreds of jobs and generate millions each week for the city. So really, in the long term scope of things (the BIG PICTURE) sports (and their stadiums) are beneficial for the city due to the amount of money they'll generate long term, along with their impact on the job market. 

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In New Orleans, High Hopes for the Perfect NBA Team Name

In New Orleans, High Hopes for the Perfect NBA Team Name | Sports: The Cultural & Economic Impact on Cities | Scoop.it
The new owner of the Hornets wants to change the team's name. But in a city obsessed with its own authenticity, finding the right one will be no easy task.

 

 

Could the name of a team really make a difference?

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Seth Dixon's comment, July 20, 2012 5:26 PM
Good start to a very interesting sounding project.
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Nebraska Cornhusker Fans Chop-Block Pipeline

Nebraska Cornhusker Fans Chop-Block Pipeline | Sports: The Cultural & Economic Impact on Cities | Scoop.it

Sports can become a lot of things in different places. On the college scene, in places like Nebraska, college football is religion, with the exception being its held on Saturdays not Sundays.  In Nebraska the people are using the setting of a sport's venue to take a certain stance on a political issue. Once again sports play a crucial role in the Cultural make up of the community, in this case a state.

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Lipsitz: Silence of the Rams

Lipsitz: Silence of the Rams | Sports: The Cultural & Economic Impact on Cities | Scoop.it

When the Rams moved to St. Louis a pubically funded $700 Million dollar stadium was funded and built for them. To their credit, they won the Superbowl in 2000. However, all that money did not come out of nowhere. The money was reallocated from school districts and all other sorts of city funds. Now, because of the stadium the city is in debt and shackled to the Rams, which might move at the end of 2015 season which would leave the city on the hook for the whole bill. Sports do have a negative impact on cities.

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Dark Days: When the Colts Left Baltimore

A look back on the 27th Anniversary of the the NFL Colts dark flight from Baltimore in the middle of the night.

 

When the Colts left they took the heart of Balitmore and left the fans in utter disbelief. Robert Irsay had no intention of staying whether he got his new staidum for the Colts or not, he wanted out and had been looking since 1976. The city of Baltimore was not going to budge on the construction of a new pubically funded stadium simply because it was too expensive and the citry didn't have the money. All that remained in Baltimore was an empty Memorial Stadium, which wasn't perfect but was in really decent shape and the Orioles. 

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Ms. Harrington's comment, August 8, 2012 6:09 AM
I never knew about this particular team, but I can see how a sports franchise abandoning a city has a devastating effect. It seems like there was a deliberate attempt to "sneak"out.
Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, August 8, 2012 6:16 AM
Quite a blow to the entire city of Baltimore, you can see from the older footage as well as the new how badly this effected this city. A huge impact on the people, seemingly crushing spirits across the city.
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Do You Know Your Enemy? Why we should all root for the Miami Heat to beat the Oklahoma City Thunder

Do You Know Your Enemy? Why we should all root for the Miami Heat to beat the Oklahoma City Thunder | Sports: The Cultural & Economic Impact on Cities | Scoop.it

Now being a huge Celtics fan I wanted nothing more than to see OKC wipe the floor with the Heat in the finals this year. However, OKC got what was coming to them, well the owners did anyway. When you rip the sense of pride and identity away from a city like the way the current owners of the Oklahoma City Thunder did to the fans in Seattle you should get punished and humiliated. Seattle lost the Sonics to OKC in 2009 and have been heartbroken since, but I bet they're happy the Thunder choked on the biggest stage. I never thought I would say this, but I'm glad the Heat won and grabbed some revenge for the city of Seattle. 

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"Sports Facilities Development & Urban Generation"

Here we have a look at the question of funding and justification on sports facilities for investment. The authors of this piece also look at how the construction of a sports facilities was not to get the community involved but instead used to spur urban development. 

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Kim Vignale's comment, August 8, 2012 6:27 PM
A sports facility would definitely increase revenue and provide the youth a place to practice sports.More people would flock to an area with a sports facility due to job availability and cheaper houses with lower taxes.
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The Social Benefits of Bringing Back the Sonics | Slog

The Social Benefits of Bringing Back the Sonics | Slog | Sports: The Cultural & Economic Impact on Cities | Scoop.it
If sports teams are so important, wheres the drive to get nascar? Its the number one sport in the country. ( by capita or some bullshit metric ) OH THATS RIGHT NASCAR DIDNT BREAK UP WITH THE CITY AND DIDNT LEAVE ...

 

Having a Professional Sports team in a city provides those living in it with a sense of pride and presence, according to this article. Despite the fact that building massive areanas for these teams makes no economic sense, the argument for the social benefits of having a professional sports team certainly outweigh the economic reasoning. One particular tool Mr. Staten takes a look at is the quality of life index of the city, which are benefits those living in the city can share without ever actually paying for them. In this case, watching the Sonics on tv or reading about them in the paper will do. In this article the argument has been made that professional sports teams are socially beneficial to a city. 


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