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How to get into the mindset of a winner: lessons from Olympic athletes

How to get into the mindset of a winner: lessons from Olympic athletes | Sports Info | Scoop.it

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Want to win an Olympic final? Get in touch with your emotions

Want to win an Olympic final? Get in touch with your emotions | Sports Info | Scoop.it

Athletes need to learn to find and access their ideal emotional state to achieve their best. For more on sports psychology and mental conditioning, download the Mindfuel app at apps.appmachine.com/7987JF


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Maintaining fitness — not resting — may be key to recovering from an injury

Maintaining fitness — not resting — may be key to recovering from an injury | Sports Info | Scoop.it
Experts no longer think rest, ice and over-the-counter painkillers are the answer.
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Manipulating Carbohydrate Availability To Improve Running Performance | Competitor.com

Manipulating Carbohydrate Availability To Improve Running Performance | Competitor.com | Sports Info | Scoop.it
It’s hard to train in a perpetually bonked state.
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Is The Win-at-All-Costs Culture Ruining Youth Sports?

It's no secret that at the highest levels of sport, some athletes, trainers, coaches and administrators will side-step the rules and do whatever it takes to win. But in an era where that culture has trickled-down from our television screens to our local sports leagues, and sometimes even in to our own back yards, I think it's fair time we ask the question: Is the win-at-all-costs mindset ruining youth sports? At its best, youth and prep sports are a comfortable forum where kids can develop skills, have fun and learn how to win and lose with humility. A blank canvass on which the next generation can begin to harness the benefits of teamwork, comradery, perseverance and other invaluable lessons which help them mature into better versions of themselves. Yet across today's sporting landscape, you don't have to look too far to see that those values are being corrupted. Local newspaper headlines are flush with stories of hazing, hyper-competitive parenting, performance-enhancing drugs, address and birth certificate manipulation, safety concerns, unethical recruiting practices and a whole host of other indiscretions that continue to chip away at the very essence of what these games are meant to be. It's as though some of youth sport's most treasured values, like integrity, respect and the preservation of a level playing field are being discarded, and thrown to the wayside in the name of ambition and hollow victory. Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying that everyone should get a trophy. I believe there is huge value in teaching our youth to win. In fact, it's that competitive fire and hunger to be the best that drives our society forward. It's also an inextricable part of what makes many of our local communities so remarkable. But on the youth level, that appetite for victory cannot, and must not, be allowed to trample on the fundamental principles of fair play. The future of sport depends on it. Youth sports in Decline Perhaps this win-at-all-cost culture is the reason why more kids than ever before are choosing not to participate in youth sports. According to a study published by the Sports and Fitness Industry Association, inactivity among children has neared 20%, a statistic that has trended upwards for seven years running. Other issues like specialization also continue to be a problem, the extent to which the average number of team sports played per child fell 5.9% from 2010-2015 according to the same study. Even more disturbing perhaps is a recent report out of the England's University of Kent to be published in April's Journal of Sports Sciences that suggests high-pressure parenting is driving some youth athletes towards the use of performance enhancing drugs. So how do we fix it? The first step in righting this ship is understanding where the negative behavior stems from. More often than not, it's the adults in the room, not the youth participants themselves who initiate it. It's those in charge who sometimes forget their most basic responsibilities: to protect the athletes, to preserve a level playing field and to help create a community in which integrity and winning are not mutually exclusive. Why is this so important? Because at the end of the day, it's the kids, teenagers and young adults themselves who are most harmed by unethical behavior. It's the pee wee football player whose safety is put at risk by a coach who decides winning is more important than his well-being. Or the up-and-coming soccer star who is robbed of her chance to win a championship because other schools are illegally recruiting and stacking the deck. The truth is, this is an important moment for youth sports, and if we're going to stem the tide we have to start asking difficult questions: What lessons are we really teaching our children? That cheating to win is okay? That if you're willing to break the rules, you can get what you want? Are these the values we want to instill in our youth? As CEO of the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency, I can tell you that we are faced with these types of behaviors on a regular basis, whether it's the aspiring professional athlete looking for an edge, or a systematic, state-sponsored doping program that prioritizes Olympic medal counts over athlete health and wellness. Time and time again, we see that regardless of the circumstance, it's the ones who are doing it the right way who are forced to suffer most. And as an organization committed to clean sport, we go to work every day to protect those athletes' rights, and to assure people around the world that not only can you compete with integrity - but you can win with it as well. As John Wooden - a man who knew a thing or two about winning - once said, "Be more concerned with your character than your reputation." For the sake of our youth and the sports they love, I hope we can start heeding that advice, lest the deterioration of our youth sports model lead to the deterioration of something far greater.

-- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.


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The Greatest Champions Have Two Very Special Attitudes - PsyBlog

The Greatest Champions Have Two Very Special Attitudes - PsyBlog | Sports Info | Scoop.it
“Two motivational keys to becoming a champion.”
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Ian Boreham's curator insight, May 22, 2016 9:40 PM

Commitment and desire - 2 key attributes for success.

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Japanese exoskeleton could help users walk and run, no batteries required

Japanese exoskeleton could help users walk and run, no batteries required | Sports Info | Scoop.it
“ Japanese researchers at Hiroshima University and Daiya Industry Co. have created an assistive exoskeleton that does away with heavy batteries and motors. Instead, their Unplugged Powered Suit (UPS) harnesses the wearer's own weight.​”
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Do You Want to Be The “Special Case” or The “Success Story?”

Do You Want to Be The “Special Case” or The “Success Story?” | Sports Info | Scoop.it
“When it comes to doing the difficult things in life like saving money, losing weight, getting a better job or more education, creating an emergency fund, or engaging in almost any form of self-improvement, a lot of people claim to be the...”
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Barry Deutsch's curator insight, May 29, 2013 9:07 PM

Jennifer makes a great point in her blog post about people being "special cases". I have a different phrase for this syndrome. I call it:


Excuses and Explanations


The vast majority of individuals, whether they are 13 or 55, make excuses, absolve themselves of blame, point the finger at others, try to play the victim, and just refuse to step up and give it their best.


I'm sure there are many psychological reasons for this dysfunctional behavior. On my high school basketball team, I teach my girls there is no excuses and explanations. You either did it or you didn't do it. Period. Don't blame your teammates, the bounce of the ball, the other team, the refs, or your parents - just give it your very best effort. If you fall short, you fall short - but at least you tried and gave it everything you could.


I also teach my high school players another trait, which is to NEVER say "I can't do that". Another Coach Barryism is telling the girls - you have no idea what your truly capable of achieving. Stop putting limits on yourself with negative thoughts. Try it. If you fail, keep working at it and improve every day until you master it.


Why do the vast majority (80 percent or more) want to make excuses and explanations before they even try? I can understand being discouraged, humilated, or frustrated by difficult tasks and work - but to give up before trying - that's just unacceptable.


 

Barry Deutsch

Master Coach for Hiring, Job Search, and Social Networking

 

If you liked this post, visit Barry Deutsch's Web Portal to discover the wide range of topics through his publishing empire of blogs and curated content on subjects including hiring and retaining top talent, sales through social media, and motivation-character-values.

 

http://www.barrydeutsch.net



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The NFL To Incorporate Virtual Reality Into Workplace Diversity Training With The Help Of Stanford

The NFL To Incorporate Virtual Reality Into Workplace Diversity Training With The Help Of Stanford | Sports Info | Scoop.it
“The NFL To Incorporate Virtual Reality Into Workplace Diversity Training With The Help Of Stanford”
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Djokovic's New Tennis Psychology

Djokovic's New Tennis Psychology | Sports Info | Scoop.it
“Novak Djokovic's extraordinary dominance of men's tennis shows no sign of abating. By far the most consistent of the 'big four' players since 2011”
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Why you should never cross your legs

Why you should never cross your legs | Sports Info | Scoop.it
Useful information for both men and women.
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The Science of Hunger: How to Control It and Fight Cravings

The Science of Hunger: How to Control It and Fight Cravings | Sports Info | Scoop.it
Take control of your hunger. Live Science explains what hunger is, from the molecular signals that drive it to the psychology of cravings.
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Video: Sports Nutrition Consumers Want Innovation, Certification and Brandification

Video: Sports Nutrition Consumers Want Innovation, Certification and Brandification | Sports Info | Scoop.it
Sports nutrition consumers are varied, from bodybuilders to weight-management seekers and weekend warriors, but they all want one thing: products that
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No One Wins Gold for Practicing the Most

No One Wins Gold for Practicing the Most | Sports Info | Scoop.it
“A new study suggests there are limits to the “10,000-hour rule” and how far practice and hard work can take an athlete”
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This Is Exactly What Happens to Your Body When You Don't Take a Rest Day

This Is Exactly What Happens to Your Body When You Don't Take a Rest Day | Sports Info | Scoop.it
If you're someone who has a hard time giving yourself a break, and you've been skipping rest days, then listen up: while we admire your dedication, skipping your recovery is doing you more harm than you think.

We wanted to find out exactly what
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8 Super Foods That Boost Immunity

8 Super Foods That Boost Immunity | Sports Info | Scoop.it
A super food contains a variety of disease-fighting nutrients, is readily available, economical and delicious without the need for salty seasoning or added fat, says Pittsburgh sports dietitian and Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics spokesperson Heat...
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Young people face ‘misinformation’ on sports nutrition

Young people face ‘misinformation’ on sports nutrition | Sports Info | Scoop.it
Teenagers need protection from ‘unhealthy messages’ on body image, conference hears
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SeussGuideToTwitter.jpg (1000x3944 pixels)

SeussGuideToTwitter.jpg (1000x3944 pixels) | Sports Info | Scoop.it
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Crutches are finally getting a redesign after 150 years

Crutches are finally getting a redesign after 150 years | Sports Info | Scoop.it

The M+D Crutch is designed around a simple premise: Elbows, not armpits.


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Why concentration is so important in sports

Why concentration is so important in sports | Sports Info | Scoop.it
“This past weekend's Syracuse upset over Virginia was thrilling. As a sports psychologist, what caught my eye during the game was a 10-second sequence during the first half. Take a look here. Syracuse freshman Tyler Lydon fell and his sneaker came off. His fellow freshman teammate Michael Gbinije picks up the shoe - while he's dribbling - and tosses it off the court. Gbinije then passes to Lydon, who makes a clean 3-point shot… wearing only 1 sneaker. Amazing! - Sarah M. Whitman, MD, Philadelphia Philly.com”
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Mastering the Mental Game | Finding Mastery

Mastering the Mental Game | Finding Mastery | Sports Info | Scoop.it
Pete Carroll and Michael Gervais recently spoke at the Wisdom 2.0 Conference about “Mastering the Mental Game.” “You can’t be at your best if you’re not totally in the moment.” – Pete Carroll In the video, some topics discussed include: Why the Seattle...
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The fall: how diving became football’s worst crime | Alejandro Chacoff

The fall: how diving became football’s worst crime | Alejandro Chacoff | Sports Info | Scoop.it
The long read: In a game with many forms of foul play, the dive now inspires a particular moralistic outrage
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Linus J Fernandes's curator insight, April 6, 2016 12:27 PM
A beautiful piece of long-form journalism on the beautiful game.
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7 Things Parents Can Do at the End of a Sports Season

7 Things Parents Can Do at the End of a Sports Season | Sports Info | Scoop.it
The conclusion of a sports season can be a time of excitement, relief, and suffering for parents of athletes.
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Elite Athletes Depend on Sports Massage

Elite Athletes Depend on Sports Massage | Sports Info | Scoop.it
Inside the 27,000-square-foot CU Sports Medicine and Performance Center, three massage therapists provide sports massage for athletes and others.
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Why SPITTING is as good as swallowing when it comes to sports drinks

Why SPITTING is as good as swallowing when it comes to sports drinks | Sports Info | Scoop.it
Dr Lindsay Bottoms, a senior lecturer in exercise physiology at Hertfordshire University, found rinsing the mouth with a sports drink improved performance without the additional calories.
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