Sports Magazine: Sowers, B.
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Rescooped by Brandy Sowers from Instructional Coaches
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The Difference Between Teaching and Coaching | From the Field

The Difference Between Teaching and Coaching | From the Field | Sports Magazine: Sowers, B. | Scoop.it
Periodically, we like to give you a look behind the curtain at an internal staff blog curated by PPI's technical assistance program.

Via Margo Nygard
Brandy Sowers's insight:

The emphasis of player development, instead of winning is a hard concept to grasp. Like stated in the article, it's easy for coaches to be overwhelmed with just trying to win. I believe that focusing on fundamentals, no matter what the sport, is essential for every team/coach/player. Coaches who provide their players with the fundamentals should allow them to grow based off of what they've learned, and avoid over-coaching. Over-coaching is almost a step backwards. If you're constantly telling athletes what to do, then they'll become dependent, which doesn't help them develop as an athlete or as a person.

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25 Coaching Tips

25 Coaching Tips | Sports Magazine: Sowers, B. | Scoop.it
Coaching youth sports is a significant responsibility. Use these 25 tips to make a greater impact on your players.
Brandy Sowers's insight:

Being that this link focuses on coaching youth sports, I find these 25 tips to be very useful. Some I wouldn't have thought of before.

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John Wooden on true success


Via Brien Smith
Brandy Sowers's insight:

John Wooden seems to have infinite knowledge to share with fellow coaches. He explains that the rules he held for his players are also valuable life skills (be on time, keep neat and clean, no profanity). Wooden's point of his talk is that success varies for people. One man's success may be another man's failure, but it's all about self-satisfaction, and knowing that you made the effort to be the best you could be. I think this is great advice for players. But, I think that most players need a coach to tell them that. This day in age, it's all about winning and personal success, rather than team success. I believe coaches need to reiterate self-satisfaction among athletes.

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Brien Smith's curator insight, February 17, 2014 2:29 PM

It is important for our youth to understand that not everyone will succeed in the same way and that this is perfectly acceptable. John Wooden teaches that people should accept what they can control and that they should never try to be better than anyone else, but should try to learn from everyone. What should be stressed in youth sports is that children do the best that they can do and that coaches and parents should not push them past what they are capable. The biggest goal of youth sports should be to teach the younger generations through not just words, but actions.

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Coaching an unfamiliar sport

Coaching an unfamiliar sport | Sports Magazine: Sowers, B. | Scoop.it
Jeff Mitchell – Community Coach Advisor – Sport Auckland / GACU Twice this week I have had coaches mention the idea of coaching a sport they have never played, including my good friend Mark Carter ...

Via PositivoCoach
Brandy Sowers's insight:

I personally believe that there is a significant difference between coaching and playing a sport. I, myself, have a high interest in coaching sports I've never played, such as football or lacrosse. This is a good read that focuses on coaches who may have experience with another sport, but want to coach something different. Coaching isn't just necessarily instructing players, but finding their fire and what motivates them, which can be accomplished by someone who hasn't coach a certain sport. I think this article is very useful, especially for my own future endeavors.

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Philosophy of Sport Coaching

Philosophy of Sport Coaching | Sports Magazine: Sowers, B. | Scoop.it
Philosophy of Sport and Coaching. From Space and Time to Space and Motion as the Metaphysical Foundation for Sports Coaching and Drills.

Via Juan-carlos Luis-pascual
Brandy Sowers's insight:

This article makes a lot of good points about participating in sports, whether it's as a coach or player. For coaches, it provides hints on how to build players that are consistent through practice. In doing so, coaches shouldn't have players perform complex actions while training, because more than likely the athlete isn't actually completing the action right, but instead they're doing it wrong which isn't helping. It emphasizes to break things down, and conquer smaller jobs before exploding into large complicated sequences. Helpful read!

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Role model for good sportsmanship? Yes please. - The Courier-Journal

Role model for good sportsmanship? Yes please. - The Courier-Journal | Sports Magazine: Sowers, B. | Scoop.it
Role model for good sportsmanship? Yes please.
The Courier-Journal
Years ago, when I helped run the chess club at Norton Elementary School, I was all about kids learning the game, competing well and being good sports.
Brandy Sowers's insight:

I appreciate Louisville guard Russ Smith's attitude about the game and sportsmanship. Rather than be a bad sport after a loss, he gives the other team credit. I think that's important for coaches to relay to their players. Whether you win or lose, it's better to be a great sport. Fans, coaches and opposing players will remember if you're the one player with a bad attitude who can't hold their composure. Good little article for coaches to share with their players.

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