Grade Inflation
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Grade Inflation – Articles – Resources – CETL – Minnesota State University, Mankato

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Richard , Schiming. "Grade Inflation." Mnsu.edu. N.p., 28 Mar 2014. Web. 28 Mar 2014. <https://www.mnsu.edu/cetl/teachingresources/articles/gradeinflation.html>.In the article above is talking about grade inflation at Minnesota State University. Grade Inflation has been a big issue the last 20 years. It is defined as students receive same grade as students in the past with less work required and less learning. There was a time when grading did not reward the better-qualified students. Between 1955 to 1965 grade deflation was more of an issue. There are eight points that are causes of grade inflation. Institutional pressure to retain students, Increased attention and sensitivity to personal crisis situations for students, Higher grades used to obtain better student evaluations of teaching, the increased use of subjective or motivational factors in grading, changing grading policies and practices, faculty attitudes, content deflation, and changing mission. Some of the implications that were mentioned were that students needed to share their strengths and weaknesses in the classroom. Solutions included hoping to find more accurately the nature of student’s performance. 

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Is the Sky Falling? Grade Inflation and the Signaling Power of Grades

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Pattison, Evangeleen, Eric Grodsky, and Chandra Muller. "Is the Sky Falling? Grade Inflation and the Signaling Power of Grades." (2012): n. page. Print. <http://edr.sagepub.com/content/42/5/259>.

In the above Journal Is the Sky Falling? Grade Inflation and the Signaling Power of Grades it talks about how Grades are the fundamental currency of our educational system. They show academic success and skills of the students to parents and employers. Grade inflations show the value of grades and undermine how hard the student has to work for it. Not everyone realizes how much grade inflation plays a role in the grading system and schooling system. Research has found that years following 1972 high school grades have rose and 4- year colleges have dropped. Also research has found that signaling power of grades is more of a matter then we thought it was. Grade inflation has change over the years in many different ways. Not just over time but in different schools and school systems. I feel that grade inflation has more power over college than high school because more college students receive A’s and B’s. There are different reasons why grade inflation could be a good thing or a bad thing. 

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Grade Inflation : A Crisis in College Education

Grade Inflation : A Crisis in College Education | Grade Inflation | Scoop.it
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Johnson, Valen. Grade Inflation: A Crisis in College Education. 2003. eBook. <http://ec3lp8kh9a.search.serialssolutions.com/?ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&ctx_enc=info:ofi/enc:UTF-8&rfr_id=info:sid/summon.serialssolutions.com&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:book&rft.genre=book&rft.title=Grade inflation&rft.au=Johnson, Valen E&rft.date=2011-01 01&rft.pub=Springer&rft.isbn=9780387001258&rft.externalDBID=n/a&rft.externalDocID=12148633¶mdict=en-US>.

This e-book above looks at the occurrence of grade inflation and its impact on postsecondary education. Grade inflation is a national if not international problem. The contents of this book consisted of six main points. One being the DUET experiment. It consisted monitoring students as they viewed mean grades and course evaluations of courses taught in the past. Second, grades and student evaluations of teaching which work together in this matter. Third, DUET analysis of grades and Sets. Which is where student connect their success with the grade they make in the class. Also how teachers feel if they give the students a good grade their evaluation will be good. Fourth, Validity of SETS that is establishing the relation between student evaluations of teaching forms and student achievement. Fifth, grades and student course selection that mean the grading policies do not hurt the students as much as their course selection decisions. Last but not least sixth, Grade equity, it shows the difference in grades with different subjects and show which ones are more lenient in grading. This e-book showed many different ways of looking at grade inflation.

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Why College Grade Inflation is a Real Problem and How to Fix It - US News

Why College Grade Inflation is a Real Problem and How to Fix It - US News | Grade Inflation | Scoop.it
Inflated grades are a serious problem, but there are ways to fix them.
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Slavov, Sita. "How to Fix College Grade Inflation." US News. U.S.News & World Report, 26 Dec. 2013.Web.24 Mar.2014 <http://www.usnews.com/opinion/bl

ogs/economic-intelligence/2013/12/26/why-college-grade-inflation-is-a-real-problem-and-how-to-fix-it>.

This article is making it out to be that college grade inflation is something that needs to be changed. Some have argued that these inflated grades are necessary to help students get ahead in a competitive job market. Grade inflation has also been thought of an issue that imposes serious costs on society. Grade inflation does not show what the student is really capable of doing. Without grade inflation the student would get what they worked for, with grade inflation the teacher gives them what they deserve making it difficult to differentiate them. There is evidence that lenient grading reduces student effort. Professor’s worry that giving low grades will harm their student’s evaluation scores. Some professors will give them a good grade just to avoid grading or arguing with students about grades. Professors are helping students to identify and enroll in courses with lenient grading. Even though if employers are aware that grades in a particular course are high they will be less impressed with the students who earned those grades. Grade inflation should be less of a problem if the entire grading scale could shift upwards over time. It would help in so many ways. 

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Video on Grade Inflation

What is grade inflation, and how is it bad for students? Dr. Tom Lindsay explains in this 3 minute video. 


Via Alberto Acereda, Ph.D.
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Policy Perspective. Tom Lindsay, 2014. Film. 26 Mar 2014. <https://www.youtube.com/watchv=onE1DreWXkI&feature=youtu.be>.

This video on Grade inflation covers points of the past and the present. They should be giving the students the grade they earn so that the colleges can tell the difference between the students who try and who do not. In the1960s 16% of students across the country received an A as the common grade. Today that percent has tripled. Grade inflation devours the currency of higher education, which are grades on a transcript. 73% of grades today in college are A’s and B’s so when colleges look at the grades they can not differentiate between the students because they all make A’s and B’s. Grade inflation is reducing away stem majors like Science, Technology, Engineering and Math. If the students were just getting better at college than we would see an increase in IQ tests over the same period and performance. The schools that actually took grades back in 1900’s were known as the better schools and we would want our scores to be lower instead of higher. On the transcripts teachers are giving the grade that they got for the individual class and the score that the whole class got.

         

 

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Grade-Inflation-800full.png (800×507)

Grade-Inflation-800full.png (800×507) | Grade Inflation | Scoop.it
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Foster, Jacqueline. How bad is Grade Inflation. 2012. Cartoon. n.p. Web. 30 Mar 2014. <http://accreditedonlinecolleges.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/gradflation/Grade-Inflation-800full.png>.In the picture above a description is shown about Grade inflation. The picture goes into detail about certain percentages of race; including white, Hispanic, Asians and African Americans. A’s and B’s make up 73% of grades of public schools. Private schools make up 86% of grades. Every decade grades go up 0.1 out of a 4-point scale. At schools like Duke, Columbia and Harvard less than 2% of grades are Ds and Fs. Grade inflation makes A’s the majority. Private schools make more A’s and B’s most likely because they are at a higher society. 

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Contents: Going Public with Our Teaching: An Anthology of Practice

Contents: Going Public with Our Teaching: An Anthology of Practice | Grade Inflation | Scoop.it
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Hatch, Thomas, Dilruba Ahmed, Ann Lieberman, Deborah Faigenbaum, Melissa White, and Desiree Mace.Going Public with Our Teaching. 2005. 328. Print. <http://www.goingpublicwithteaching.org/contents.html>.

The Anthology that is listed above is about Going Public with Our Teaching. There are more issues that teachers have to go through on a day-to-day basis in the classrooms. From lack of time and support to resources and inadequate pay and preparation. This e-book has four parts to it that although does not speak directly about grade inflation it connects to public education. Part one talks about the culture of schools and classrooms, teachers speak of problems and possibilities that go on in schools/classrooms. Part two speaks of the content of the curriculum and expanding classroom understanding and how student’s questions and concerns have a key part in a wide range of disciplines. Part three speaks of Issues of equity, race and culture and how those three main points are a big part in how teachers teach and what they have to face. Part four is about negotiating the dilemmas of teaching and this talks more about what challenges teachers really have to deal with and how they make a solution for them. 

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Is It Grade Inflation, or Are Students Just Smarter?

Is It Grade Inflation, or Are Students Just Smarter? | Grade Inflation | Scoop.it
A MILLION dollars isn't what it used to be, and neither is an A in college. A's -- including A-pluses and A-minuses -- make up about half the grades at many elite schools, according to a recent survey by Princeton of the Ivy League and several other leading universities.
Lauren Raye Hallman's insight:

Arenson, Karen W. “Is it Grade inflation, or Are Students Just Smarter?” n.d: Pag, The New York Times, The New York Times, 17 Apr. 2004. Web. 24 Mar.2014 <http://www.nytimes.com/2004/04/18/weekinreview/is-it-grade-inflation-or-are-students-just-smarter.html>.

In this newspaper article it shared information more about how it was grade inflation over if the students are just smarter. It told how A’s make up half the grades at many elite schools. At Princeton some faculty have proposed correcting grade inflation by limiting A’s to 35 percent of course grades. There were only minor changes in grade distributions between 1970’s and 1990’s even at highly selective institutions. Students were withdrawing from courses and repeating courses for higher grades. Teachers are becoming aware how competitive the academic world has become and try to help students by giving them better grades. Student ratings to evaluate teachers also inflate grades. Assigning grades, low ones are tough it requires more work, since low grades have to be backed up with evidence of poor performance. All this information shows how grade inflation has a bigger impact than we thought it did. Students may be smart but in the end it all has to do with ratings and performance. 

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Analysis: Higher education grade inflation.(3:00-4:00 PM)(Broadcast transcript) | HighBeam Business: Arrive Prepared

Analysis: Higher education grade inflation.(3:00-4:00 PM)(Broadcast transcript) | HighBeam Business: Arrive Prepared | Grade Inflation | Scoop.it
Analysis: Higher education grade inflation.(3:00-4:00 PM)(Broadcast transcript) - Find NPR Talk of the Nation articles
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Conan, Neal, dir. Dir. Beth Bogan. NPR Talk of the Nation. 4 May 2004. Television. <http://business.highbeam.com/152432/article-1G1-162002637/analysis-higher-education-grade-inflation>.

I read this Analysis Broadcast transcript on Higher Education Grade Inflation. It had Neal Conana host of Talk of The Nation and Beth Bogan from Princeton University asking are teachers being pressured to giving out good grades? Junior faculty who is looking for promotions in particular. Some teachers were afraid of being told how to grade. Teachers are giving these students the A’s that they want so that they can have a good student evaluation done. They are starting to think to make the grades more serious. It will hopefully help students competing for fellowships because people will know that no more than 35 percent on average got A's. The 35 percent though is not just A’s it is also A’s A+ and A- so really it’s not that bad. It would make too much of a change. Very large changes are more disruptive than middle-size changes. So this transcript they are against grade inflation because it would do more damage than good. 

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M. T. C. Library Remote Access -

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Goodfellow, Wayne “Grade inflation” National Post. National Post. 16 Jan. 2003 Web. 24. Mar. 2014

This national post talks about if the school system was different we would not need grade inflation. As long as there is no standardized testing at the national or provincial level, there will be rampant grade inflation and the degree of inflation will vary significantly between provinces, schools and individual classrooms. It should not come as a surprise, therefore, that boys are commonly turned off by the education system, do less well than girls at school, and now represent only 43% of the university. The solution to this is national standardized testing and a revised curriculum. Even better, a student's IQ should be taken into account, because raw intelligence, not the number of degrees, is the single largest predictor of success. Perhaps then university resources would be directed toward those who would most benefit from a university education. Students should want to earn their grade not have it given to them to avoid difficulties or arguments. Grade inflation should not be the main focus in public education. 

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